Educating for Character: How Our Schools Can Teach Respect and Responsibility

( 3 )

Overview

One of the greatest challenges facing our schools today is teaching our children respect, responsibility, hard work, compassion, and other values so desperately needed in today's society. Most parents say they want help from the schools in teaching children a basic sense of right and wrong, but "values education" can be profoundly controversial, even feared. In a pluralistic society where values often clash, schools struggle with fundamental questions: What values should they ...
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Educating for Character: How Our Schools Can Teach Respect and Responsibility

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Overview

One of the greatest challenges facing our schools today is teaching our children respect, responsibility, hard work, compassion, and other values so desperately needed in today's society. Most parents say they want help from the schools in teaching children a basic sense of right and wrong, but "values education" can be profoundly controversial, even feared. In a pluralistic society where values often clash, schools struggle with fundamental questions: What values should they teach? And how should they teach them?

Now Dr. Thomas Lickona, an international authority on moral development and education and the author of Raising Good Children, cuts through this controversy to report on dozens of practical, successful programs that are teaching the values necessary for our children's moral development and a decent, humane society. His twelve-point program offers practical strategies designed to create a working coalition of parents, teachers, and communities -- anyone who cares about the character of young people today.

The first paperback publication of an award-winning study on the need for values in education in American classrooms--from the author of the parenting classic Raising Good Children. Drawing on 20 years of research, Dr. Lickona cuts through the controversy to report on scores of practical, successful programs that are turning schools around.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Lickona, author of Raising Good Children ( LJ 9/15/83), views the school as a major force in responding to America's moral crisis. He defines values, discusses how they may be taught, and outlines the role of school and family. He emphasizes values as an important factor in the well being of a nation, family, and individual. His arguments are good ones. However, this is the age of diversification, political action committees, and special interest groups. Issues such as homosexuality, condom distribution, abortion, and AIDS call forth a number of opinions absolutely believed in with little tolerance for opposition, reasoned or otherwise. These aspects make a commonality or sharing of values a very difficult prospect. On a technical level, the lack of an index reduces the book's utility. Notwithstanding these criticisms, Educating for Character should be made available to teachers, future teachers, and parents.-- Federico U. Acerri, Wayne Cty. Regional Educational Svce. Agency, Mich.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780553370522
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 9/28/1992
  • Pages: 496
  • Sales rank: 402,082
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.98 (h) x 1.28 (d)

Table of Contents

Part 1 Educating for Values and Character
1. The Case for Values Education 3
2. Educating for Character--and Why Schools Need Help from Home 23
3. What Values Should Schools Teach? 37
4. What Is Good Character? 49
Part 2 Classroom Strategies for Teaching Respect and Responsibility
Introduction to Parts Two and Three: Teaching Respect and Responsibility: The Big Ideas 67
5. The Teacher as Caregiver, Model, and Mentor 71
6. Creating a Moral Community in the Classroom 89
7. Moral Discipline 109
8. Creating a Democratic Classroom Environment: The Class Meeting 135
9. Teaching Values Through the Curriculum 161
10. Cooperative Learning 185
11. The Conscience of Craft 208
12. Encouraging Moral Reflection 228
13. Raising the Level of Moral Discussion 249
14. Teaching Controversial Issues 268
15. Teaching Children to Solve Conflicts 286
Part 3 Schoolwide Strategies for Teaching Respect and Responsibility
16. Caring Beyond the Classroom 303
17. Creating a Positive Moral Culture in the School 323
18. Sex Education 348
19. Drugs and Alcohol 375
20. Schools, Parents, and Communities Working Together 395
Appendix A Getting Started and Maintaining Momentum 421
Notes 425
Index 457
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
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Sort by: Showing 1 – 5 of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 2, 2004

    mostly crap with a few good points hidden in there

    First off, I will admit that I only read the first four chapters of the book, and only because it was required for a class (had I been reading voluntarily, I would have thrown it away after the third page). However, those four chapters were enough to tell me that the rest of the book wouldn't be worth reading anyway. The way Lickona argues in favor of a universal moral sense suggests that he already knows exactly what it is, but we disagree on enough points there that I would hardly call his morals 'universal.' On one page he says that all sex by young people should 'be classified as abuse - of both self and other.' On another he suggests that questioning authority is an inherently bad thing, and another sign of general moral decay among youth. <p>The evidence Lickona uses to back up his assertions is hardly top quality either. While he does offer some legitimate statistics on things like crime rates, he also tries supporting himself by citing poorly-designed research and urban legends such as Satanic Ritual Abuse (which was thoroughly debunked after intensive investigation by the FBI). <p>On the other hand, the book is rescued from a one-star rating by the fact that, once in a while, the author does actually make a valid point. For example, he mentions several character education studies that have been implemented in some school districts in America and Canada that have been successful. While he does not go into the specifics of these programs (at least, not in the chapters I read), some of the improvements attributed to these programs are hard to see as anything but actual improvements - improved school performance, increased attendance, and lower rates of drug use and pregnancy among students. Lickona even quotes interviews from students in elementary schools with these programs who say that students overall are much more friendly and polite than in other schools they've seen. In conclusion, while this book does have a few good things in it, they are sandwiched in between way too much b.s. If you are looking for a guide to implementing a character education program in your school district, this is not it.

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    Posted January 9, 2010

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    Posted January 26, 2010

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    Posted September 15, 2011

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