Educating for Character: How Our Schools Can Teach Respect and Responsibility

Educating for Character: How Our Schools Can Teach Respect and Responsibility

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by Thomas Lickona
     
 

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Calls for renewed moral education in America's schools, offering dozens of programs schools can adopt to teach students respect, responsibility, hard work, and other values that should not be left to parents to teach.  See more details below

Overview

Calls for renewed moral education in America's schools, offering dozens of programs schools can adopt to teach students respect, responsibility, hard work, and other values that should not be left to parents to teach.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Lickona, author of Raising Good Children ( LJ 9/15/83), views the school as a major force in responding to America's moral crisis. He defines values, discusses how they may be taught, and outlines the role of school and family. He emphasizes values as an important factor in the well being of a nation, family, and individual. His arguments are good ones. However, this is the age of diversification, political action committees, and special interest groups. Issues such as homosexuality, condom distribution, abortion, and AIDS call forth a number of opinions absolutely believed in with little tolerance for opposition, reasoned or otherwise. These aspects make a commonality or sharing of values a very difficult prospect. On a technical level, the lack of an index reduces the book's utility. Notwithstanding these criticisms, Educating for Character should be made available to teachers, future teachers, and parents.-- Federico U. Acerri, Wayne Cty. Regional Educational Svce. Agency, Mich.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780307569486
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
09/02/2009
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
496
File size:
3 MB

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Educating for Character: How Our Schools Can Teach Respect and Responsibility 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
First off, I will admit that I only read the first four chapters of the book, and only because it was required for a class (had I been reading voluntarily, I would have thrown it away after the third page). However, those four chapters were enough to tell me that the rest of the book wouldn't be worth reading anyway. The way Lickona argues in favor of a universal moral sense suggests that he already knows exactly what it is, but we disagree on enough points there that I would hardly call his morals 'universal.' On one page he says that all sex by young people should 'be classified as abuse - of both self and other.' On another he suggests that questioning authority is an inherently bad thing, and another sign of general moral decay among youth.

The evidence Lickona uses to back up his assertions is hardly top quality either. While he does offer some legitimate statistics on things like crime rates, he also tries supporting himself by citing poorly-designed research and urban legends such as Satanic Ritual Abuse (which was thoroughly debunked after intensive investigation by the FBI).

On the other hand, the book is rescued from a one-star rating by the fact that, once in a while, the author does actually make a valid point. For example, he mentions several character education studies that have been implemented in some school districts in America and Canada that have been successful. While he does not go into the specifics of these programs (at least, not in the chapters I read), some of the improvements attributed to these programs are hard to see as anything but actual improvements - improved school performance, increased attendance, and lower rates of drug use and pregnancy among students. Lickona even quotes interviews from students in elementary schools with these programs who say that students overall are much more friendly and polite than in other schools they've seen. In conclusion, while this book does have a few good things in it, they are sandwiched in between way too much b.s. If you are looking for a guide to implementing a character education program in your school district, this is not it.