BN.com Gift Guide

Education and Social Mobility in the Soviet Union 1921-1934

( 1 )

Overview

This is a history of Soviet education policy 1921–34 that places special emphasis upon the theme of social mobility through education. One of the hitherto untold stories of Soviet history is the making of the 'Brezhnev generation', a cohort of young workers and Communists sent to higher education during the First Five-Year Plan (1928–1932) and subsequently catapulted into leadership positions in the wake of the Great Purge of 1937/38. A focal point of this book is the educational policies which not only produced ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (6) from $60.18   
  • New (3) from $60.45   
  • Used (3) from $60.18   
Sending request ...

Overview

This is a history of Soviet education policy 1921–34 that places special emphasis upon the theme of social mobility through education. One of the hitherto untold stories of Soviet history is the making of the 'Brezhnev generation', a cohort of young workers and Communists sent to higher education during the First Five-Year Plan (1928–1932) and subsequently catapulted into leadership positions in the wake of the Great Purge of 1937/38. A focal point of this book is the educational policies which not only produced the 'Brezhnev generation', but also linked Stalin's regime with the massive upward mobility of the industrializing 1930s. The book is the first comprehensive history of Soviet education in the 1920s and early 1930s, and provides a sequel to the author's highly praised Commissariat of Enlightenment. In this, as in the earlier study, the author has used Soviet archival sources not previously available to Western scholars.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

Table of Contents

List of tables; Acknowledgements; Part I: 1. Education and Soviet society; 2. The new Soviet school; 3. The education system: problems of mobility and specialization; 4. Professors and Soviet power; Part II: 5. The 'great turning-point' of 1928–1929; 6. Cultural Revolution and the schools; 7. Mass education and mobility in the countryside; 8. The making of a proletarian intelligentsia; Part III: 9. The restoration of order: new policies in education, 1931–1934; 10. The 'New Class': social mobility and education under Stalin; Notes; Bibliography; Index.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 31, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    Excellent study of Soviet educational reforms

    After a long struggle in the 1920s, the Soviet Union rejected the Leftist claims that schools, universities and polytechnics were survivals from a pre-modern mode of educational production, that teachers and lecturers were bourgeois or even feudal, and that culture was bourgeois. Between 1927-28 and 1932-33 the number of teachers in rural schools more than doubled. Fitzpatrick pointed out, “The achievements of the First Five-Year Plan in increasing access to primary and junior secondary education were extremely impressive: total numbers in grades I-VII (including the preparatory year introduced before grade I) grew from 11 million in 1927/28 to 21 million in 1932/33, almost 8 million of the increase occurring in rural grades I-IV. It was officially, and apparently accurately, claimed that by 1931/32 95% of the 8-11 age group were already in primary school. In addition, about three million adolescents who had previously missed primary education were studying either in the normal primary schools or in special courses created according to the Central Committee’s directive of 1930.” The number of pupils in Grades V-VII rose from 2.8 million in 1931-32 to 8.8 million in 1938-39. The number of pupils in Grades VIII-X (upper level secondary school) rose from 491,000 in 1935-36 to 2.4 million in 1940-41. The total number in secondary schools rose from 1.8 million in 1926-27 to 5.2 million in 1931-32, to 12.1 million in 1938-39. Of the apprenticeship schools, Fitzpatrick wrote, “their expansion in the following years was remarkable. In 1928/29, there were 120,000 pupils in industrial and other apprenticeship schools (building, transport, forestry, sovkhoz and so on) and 152,000 in the mainly artisan trade schools. In 1931/32, after the merging of the apprenticeship and trade schools network, the numbers in ‘FZU [factory-apprenticeship school] and FZU-type schools’ had reached over a million.” The number of teaching positions in higher education rose from 18,000 in 1927-28 to 57,000 in early 1933. Between 1927-28 and 1932-33 the number of students grew from 159,800 to 469,800. On the government’s programme of promoting workers, Fitzpatrick wrote, “Stalin’s policy prevailed, and in retrospect it must surely be seen as a very bold and imaginative policy which did in fact serve to consolidate and legitimize the regime. At the very beginning of the industrialization drive, before there was any natural expansion of opportunity for upward social mobility, the regime demonstratively repudiated the ‘bourgeois’ professionals and began to promote very large numbers of workers and peasants into the administrative and specialist elite.” She continued, “The policy and its objective – the creation of a new elite, or ‘proletarian intelligentsia’ – were clearly stated in 1928. If one assumes that Stalin saw it as a breakthrough policy that would not be indefinitely continued, the objective was successfully reached. This was a major political achievement, and its impact on the nature of the Soviet regime and leadership was lasting.” She concluded, “For the vydvizhentsy [those promoted], industrialization was an heroic achievement – their own, Stalin’s and that of Soviet power – and their promotion, linked with the industrialization drive, was a fulfillment of the promises of the revolution.”

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)