Education for Cataloging and the Organization of Information: Pitfalls and the Pendulum [NOOK Book]

Overview

What does the future hold for cataloging education?

Written by some of the best-known authors and most innovative thinkers in the field, including Michael Gorman, Sheila S. Intner, and Jerry D. Saye, this comprehensive collection examines education for students and working librarians in cataloging and bibliographic control, emphasizing history, context, the state of the art at present, and suggested future ...

See more details below
Education for Cataloging and the Organization of Information: Pitfalls and the Pendulum

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$70.95
BN.com price

Overview

What does the future hold for cataloging education?

Written by some of the best-known authors and most innovative thinkers in the field, including Michael Gorman, Sheila S. Intner, and Jerry D. Saye, this comprehensive collection examines education for students and working librarians in cataloging and bibliographic control, emphasizing history, context, the state of the art at present, and suggested future directions. A liberal dose of visual aids—charts, tables, etc.—makes accessing the information quick and easy.

From the editor:
“The education of catalogers has swung pendulum-like from on-the-job training to graduate education and back again. The place of cataloging in the library school curriculum has swung from one of near pre-eminence to one of near extinction, and has begun to swing back again. The durability of education for cataloging has swung from 'In getting your degree you will learn everything you need to know in your career,' to 'You will have to engage in continuing education throughout your career, beginning virtually as soon as you have your degree.' Making informed decisions about how (and how much) cataloging education is to be provided is full of pitfalls, some of which the profession has fallen into already. What is needed now is a reconsideration of how education for cataloging and bibliographic control is provided.”

Education for Cataloging and the Organization of Information: Pitfalls and the Pendulum addresses four main areas: the ways professionals perceive the place, nature, and necessity of cataloging education; the professional, demographic, and academic context within which cataloging education is provided; education regarding special types of materials and special aspects of cataloging; and alternatives to traditional modes of education for cataloging, including:

  • distance education
  • online mentoring
  • Web-based instruction
  • continuing education
  • training for (and via) cooperative projects
  • the role of the “community of catalogers” in the continuing education of those who provide intellectual access to the world of information
  • and much more!
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Over the past 100 years, cataloging education has seen several swings of the pendulum, from individual "apprenticeships" to the introduction of the computer and the rapid changes that technology brings. Whereas this work, published simultaneously as an issue of Cataloging & Classification Quarterly (Vol. 34, Nos. 1-3), covers some of the same ground as Cataloging: The Professional Development Cycle, edited by Sheila S. Intner and Janet Swan Hill, and Recruiting, Educating and Training Catalog Librarians: Solving the Problems (Greenwood, 1989), it is also timely, innovative, and opinionated. Hill (technical services, Univ. of Colorado Libs., Boulder) has gathered papers from such leading lights in the field as Intner, Michael Gorman, and Jerry Saye to consider, among other topics, some of the issues that have traditionally beset cataloging instruction, the framework in which both cataloging education and bibliographic control must operate today, the rapid changes affecting bibliographic control, the "rules" and technologies and how they have impacted particular aspects of cataloging education, and the major changes in education for cataloging such as who is responsible for instruction and when and where it could be given. Essential for catalog librarians and all library school educators, library administrators, and MLIS students.-Susan E. Ketcham, Long Island Univ.-Southampton Coll. Lib., NY Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781317718697
  • Publisher: Taylor & Francis
  • Publication date: 4/23/2014
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 422
  • File size: 8 MB

Table of Contents

Pitfalls and the Pendulum: Reconsidering Education for Cataloging and the Organization of Information: Preface
Why Teach Cataloguing and Classification? 1
Persistent Issues in Cataloging Education: Considering the Past and Looking Toward the Future 15
Why Does Everybody Hate Cataloging? 31
Cataloging: An Exciting Subject for Exciting Times 43
Demographic Trends Affecting Professional Technical Services Staffing in ARL Libraries 53
A New Look at US Graduate Courses in Bibliographic Control 59
Textbooks Used in Bibliographic Control Education Courses 103
Where Are We and How Did We Get Here? or, The Changing Place of Cataloging in the Library and Information Science Curriculum: Causes and Consequences 121
"If I Knew Then What I Know Now": UNCG LIS Graduates' Perspectives on Cataloging Education 145
Cataloging or Knowledge Management: Perspectives of Library Educators on Cataloging Education for Entry-Level Academic Librarians 165
Format Integration and the Design of Cataloging and Classification Curricula 189
Cataloging and Metadata Education: Asserting a Central Role in Information Organization 203
On Teaching Subject Cataloging 223
Education for Authority Control: Whose Responsibility Is It? 233
What Else Do You Need To Know? Practical Skills for Catalogers and Managers 245
Innovations in Standard Classroom Instruction 263
Online Mentoring: A Student Experience at Dominican University 289
Online Distance Learning with Cataloging Mentors: The Mentor's Viewpoint 293
When Donkeys Fly: Distance Education for Cataloging 299
An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of OCLC Online Computer Library Center's Web-Based Module on Cataloging Internet Resources Using the Anglo-American Cataloging Rules and MARC21 311
Cataloging Internet Resources Using MARC21 and AACR2: Online Training for Working Catalogers 339
The Program for Cooperative Cataloging and Training for Catalogers 355
Catalog Training for People Who Are Not Catalogers: The Colorado Digitization Project Experience 367
The Community of Catalogers: Its Role in the Education of Catalogers 375
Index 383
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)