The Education of Historians for the Twenty-First Century / Edition 1

The Education of Historians for the Twenty-First Century / Edition 1

3.0 1
by Thomas Bender, Philip F. Katz, Colin A. Palmer
     
 

ISBN-10: 0252071654

ISBN-13: 9780252071652

Pub. Date: 11/28/2003

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

In 1962, the American Historical Association published a detailed examination of the state of graduate history education in the United States. Addressing such issues as the supply and demand for teachers, student recruitment, and the best training for advanced degrees, the report set a benchmark against which to judge the study of history. Four decades later, with a…  See more details below

Overview

In 1962, the American Historical Association published a detailed examination of the state of graduate history education in the United States. Addressing such issues as the supply and demand for teachers, student recruitment, and the best training for advanced degrees, the report set a benchmark against which to judge the study of history. Four decades later, with a substantial grant from the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the AHA has returned to these issues. The Education of Historians for the Twenty-first Century documents the remarkable conclusions of this new study. Both the American academy and the study of history have been dramatically transformed since the original investigation, but doctoral programs in history have barely changed. This report explains why and offers concrete, practical recommendations for improving graduate education. The Education of Historians for the Twenty-first Century stands as the first exploration of graduate training for historians in more than forty years and the best available study of doctoral education in any major academic discipline.

Prepared for the AHA by the Committee on Graduate Education, the report reflects the views and efforts of a cross-section of the entire historical profession. It builds upon a detailed review of the existing research and data on graduate education plus an unprecedented and exhaustive survey of history doctoral programs. The authors visited history departments across the country and consulted with hundreds of individual historians, graduate students, deans, and academic and nonacademic employers of historians, as well as other stakeholders in graduate education. In the last forty years, the ethnic and gender composition of both graduate students and faculty has changed, historical methodologies have been challenged and refined, and the boundaries of historical inquiry have expanded. The Education of Historians for the Twenty-first Century breaks important new ground in addressing these revolutionary intellectual and demographic changes. Combining a detailed snapshot of the profession with a rigorous analysis of recent changes, this volume should become the definitive guide to strategic planning for history departments. It includes practical suggestions for managing institutional change as well as advice for everyone involved in the advanced training of historians, from department chairs to graduate students and from university administrators to the AHA itself. Although focused on history, there are lessons here for any department. The Education of Historians for the Twenty-first Century is a model of in-depth analysis for doctoral education, with recommendations and analyses that will have implications for the entire academy. This volume is required reading for historians, graduate students, university administrators, or anyone interested in the future of higher education.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780252071652
Publisher:
University of Illinois Press
Publication date:
11/28/2003
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
240
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.80(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsxi
Introductionxiii
Part 1Report and Recommendations
1.We Historians3
Defining Who We Are
The Golden Age Legacy
Historical Perspective
The Future of the Discipline
Education for the Future
Generational Succession in the Academy
Public and Private Universities
The Challenge
2.Necessary Discussions45
Departmental Culture
Departmental Mission and Program Requirements
Field Examinations
Fields
Language Study
Introductory Course
Interdisciplinarity and Theory
World History
Undergraduate Education and the Education of Teachers
Common Education, Plural Careers
Directors of Graduate Studies and Graduate Administrators
Professionalism and Premature Professionalization
Program Size, Funding, and Diversity
Graduate Assistants and Unions
Foreign Area Studies
New Technologies
Centers for Teaching Excellence
Preparing Future Faculty
Publication and Tenure
The Matrix of Responsibilities
The American Historical Association
3.Recommendations85
Program Size
Program Information and Recruitment
Funding
Master's Degree and Doctoral Education
Director of Graduate Studies, Placement Officer, and Staff Support
Mentoring
Annual Review
Retention and Attrition
Grievance Procedures
A Space of Their Own
Placement
Intellectual Community
Dissertation Seminars
Preparation for Teaching
Internships
Professional Ethics and Practices
Citizenship
The American Historical Association
Part 2Foundations
4.The National Shape of Doctoral Education: A Survey of Graduate Programs109
A Preliminary Sounding
Concern
Complexity
Change
Careers in Transition
Complacency
(Mis)communication between Faculty and Graduate Students
Conclusion
Appendix AConsultations with the Discipline139
Appendix BList of Respondents to the Graduate Program Survey141
Appendix CSurvey Instrument and Numerical Results, AHA Survey of Doctoral Programs in History (Spring 2001)144
Selected Bibliography on Graduate Training and Historians197
Index217

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3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I bought this book at the annual conference of the American Historical Association (the folks who brought you the study and the book). I was mildly disappointed by the book. Yes, the committee is clearly attempting to address some serious failures in graduate education and they raise great questions. Unfortunately, their answers and recommendations do not go far enough. The committee seems to suffer from a lack of imagination---their research could have been more aggressive (they should have aggressively surveyed adjuncts and young faculty, the people who feel that their graduate education has failed them) and they could have been more innovative in their recommendations to departments (their recommendations are actually fairly conservative). As an historian, I feel I am watching my own profession become irrelevant. Let us hope that graduate programs aggressively implement the changes suggested by this study---and that they become creative and implement changes which go beyond those suggested in this book. I strongly recommend the book, not because I think it's great but because I think it opens up a much-needed dialogue. If you are a faculty member at any college or university, this is essential reading.