The Education of Little Tree

( 62 )

Overview

A boy orphaned very young is adopted by his Cherokee grandmother and half-Cherokee grandfather in the Appalachian mountains of Tennessee during the Great Depression. Historical fiction.

The super-seller memoir of a Cherokee boyhood in the 1930s. The most sensitive and evocative autobiographical account ever of the Cherokee way, as seen through the eyes of a young boy in the Appalachian Mountains.

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The Education of Little Tree

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Overview

A boy orphaned very young is adopted by his Cherokee grandmother and half-Cherokee grandfather in the Appalachian mountains of Tennessee during the Great Depression. Historical fiction.

The super-seller memoir of a Cherokee boyhood in the 1930s. The most sensitive and evocative autobiographical account ever of the Cherokee way, as seen through the eyes of a young boy in the Appalachian Mountains.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Topics include the impact of new technologies on instruction, the relationship of the library and information school to other teaching departments on a campus, education for informational professionals at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, and the future of research in the information sector. Reprint in cloth of the 1985 U. of New Mexico Pr. paperback memoir of a Cherokee boyhood in the 1930s, by the man who later went on to write the Josey Wales novels. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR booknews.com
Library Journal
Proclaimed the American Booksellers Association Book of the Year in 1991, this sweet account of a boy being raised by Cherokee grandparents was exposed as false later that year. The author’s real name was Asa Earl Carter; he had no Native American ancestors, and many of the cultural references were inaccurate. Though most libraries have moved the book to fiction, it is still popular with readers seeking inspirational titles. (LJ11/15/76)

(c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780780756830
  • Publisher: University of New Mexico Press
  • Publication date: 8/28/2001
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Forrest Carter (1925-79) was born and raised in Oxford, Alabama.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 62 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(39)

4 Star

(11)

3 Star

(7)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(4)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 63 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2008

    Have several copies!!

    I actually didnt buy this book from here originally. I am buying it again though, not only to own the 25th anniversary version, but also to own a copy that isnt worn. I have read this book a dozen or more times, lent it to friends to let read, and talked about it for years. Everytime I read this book I find something new in it. Something I didnt laugh at, something I didnt learn, or something I never felt. I was an English major in college, and have read a lot of books, both for academics and for pleasure. This remains my favorite by far. Only an open-minded and full-hearted person should read this, though. Otherwise, the lessons are gone to waste.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 22, 2010

    Yeah, but.....

    I loved this book like everyone else here did. But I didn't know when I read it that it was written by a monster. Finding out about the true identity of Forrest (Asa) Carter changed everything for me. Knowing that the Cherokee people DO NOT endorse this depiction of themselves by a White supremacist KKK honcho is knowledge constantly at war with my emotional response to the book.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2010

    One of the Best Books I've Ever Read

    Apparently this book was lost on the younger readers, even though it was told from (in the beginning) a 5 year old's perspective. This book made me laugh out loud, feel sad, feel happy, and made me cry for a good hour in the end. I was devastated when I found out if was not a true story after all.

    The author was definitely not a good person, 1. for falsely claiming the book was true, and 2. for his association with segregationists (KKK). I can't imagine how someone wrote so sympathetically about Native Americans, yet was prejudiced against another race. A totally illogical contradiction to my mind.

    Even with that said I still think the book itself deserves 5 stars, just get it from the library.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2010

    A Must Read

    "The Education of Little Tree" is one of those books that can bring you out of you reality while you read it, and change your everyday life when you're not. Forest Carter makes the outdoors and a simplistic lifestyle desired instead of the busy lives that we live today. This book inspires you to stop and look around once in a while.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 24, 2004

    How to Live Your Life in a Meaningful Way

    That's what this book should be sub-titled. I love the simple humor as seen through the eyes of a child, the wisdom beyond literacy shown by the grandfather, and the understanding shown by the marriage of the grandparents that this book exemplifies. I read everything and this book is my #1 favorite of all time..YOU MUST READ THIS AND GIVE IT TO ALL OF OUR CHILDREN (TEENS, YOUNG ADULTS, ETC.)!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2004

    One of the greatest books of all time!

    Geez, where do i start? Well, i guess that i will just cut to the chase. It is by far the greatest book that i have ever read. It includes just about every tone you can ask from a book. To name a few, side-splitting laughter, suspense, and sadness. Now i must admit that i put off reading this book for about two years. But once i picked it up, I couldn't put it down. Now, if you are thinking the same way that i was when i first borrowed the book from a relative, DON'T! Whatever you do, do not put off reading this book. I can garauntee that it will be on your 'TOP 5 LIST'. And if you are thinking about buying it, hurry up! Definetly a timeless book for all ages.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 22, 2010

    This is the sadest but the best book I have read in a long time!

    The Education of Little Tree is the most amazing story. The story of a young Cherokee living with his grandparents in the mouatins. I wont give anything away because you have to read this book it is an amazing, wonderful, toching, hearfelt story that is must read for everybody. This book broke my heart and I cried hard while reading this book and I will proably read it again and again because this book has changed my life. I can not make you read this book but I can tell you that you will love it no matter who you are.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 2, 2009

    This will become a classic

    The locale of this story is in east Tennessee which once was part of the Cherokee homland. When the rest of the Cherokee were removed to Oklahoma many of the Cherokee took to the hills of Tennessee as well as the surrounding states. There they stayed and have remained to this day.
    The Education of Little Tree is about a little boy that is an orphan sent to live with his Cherokee relatives in the backwood mountains of East Tenneessee during the early 20th Century.
    The story operates on two levels. On one level it is about the interplay between the members of a family. On that level it is guaranteed to hit all of the reader's buttons. It is warm, it is funny, very occasionally it brings tears to the reader's eyes or fills our hearts with anger. As a story about people this book will become a classic and live forever.
    On the second level this book is a story about how a small segment of our society adjusted to our coming and build a life for themselves rich in value even if not in wealth.
    Ron,

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 25, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Makes you think...

    This is a book for people trying to learn how to make their world a better place by understanding what shapes different people's view of the world. I think you must be a parent to really enjoy this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 2004

    If We All Were Trees

    Of Cherokee heritage, I grew up in the foothills of the Smokies, where this story is set. It's a beautiful book, filled with heart, humor and Cherokee lore. It's my favorite book on the Cherokee, next to Walking the Trail, One Man's Journey Along the Cherokee Trail of Tears, by Native American writer Jerry Ellis.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2004

    It has meaning but its to boring for an ordinary teen.

    This book shows the discrimination that native americans face in the 30's. It lets you see the way the cherokees live and their beliefs. You can understand how they bond and care for each other. This is true and deep. Now that I told you the good stuff. I have to tell you that some parts are interesting while others, well, not so much. I might like it when im older but not that much now. But none the less i like the emotion behind it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 5, 2002

    Touching

    this was one of the best books i've ever read it taught me a lot about life and my own education if you read this please read the book

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2000

    Dissapointed

    Like other students, in highschool I was forced to read this book! But every adult had said the book was great so I thought it would be good! But, I didn't find that the book had a point to it! I do understand all the Lesson's Little Tree learned, but was that the point?!? I gave it a two because towards the end it picked up adventure/action-wise...even though I wasn't a fan of the ending! This book is probably more appreciated when read by an adult!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 13, 2014

    I Also Recommend:

    Quite enjoyable to read

    A little "slow" here and there, but stick-with-it!

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  • Posted January 10, 2014

    Totally fake!! Very interesting and intertaining story, however.

    "Forest Carter" was exposed many years ago after his death….his real name was Esa Earl Carter….Google him and see what you think! The story has been represented as a true story written by a descendent of the Cherokee. In reality nothing could be further from the truth. The fact that the publisher of this book has known this, as has the entire literary world, yet continues to hide the truth about the book and its author, apparently for the sake of sales, is appalling to me.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 15, 2012

    A very touching story

    This story touched my heart. It is a great tale about the mountains, the way of the Indian, and growing up. It is especially touching in its way of telling the story from a child's point of view. I think this is an important book to read because it addresses underlying issues that we face even today; prejudice, family, life, death. While I do recommend that everyone read this book at some point, I would say this book is best for older readers. There is quite a bit of swearing, and some scenes involving deeper issues--such as prejudice and discrimination---that would only be understood by more mature readers. Definitely a must read!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2012

    Good read

    A lot of good teachings and inspirational, as well as educational.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2012

    A one sitting read

    My all time favorite! I was given this book by a friend while camping and fishing in the Smokies of NC. I sat up all night reading by the light of a Coleman lantern. Entertaining, humorous, filled with life's lessons and the importance of family, and I promise it will bring tears at times. I have given many copies to friends and family. Five star read all the way

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  • Posted January 22, 2012

    I Loved This Book

    This book is a wonderful story about growing up Native American. The reader can learn to have an appreciation for Native American culture, as well as for nature. The ending was very sad. I would definitely recommend this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2011

    Must read!!!!!!

    I just finishrd reading this book and i am 11. Though there is a lot of swering this book is very funny. My mom and me cryed through the end when he goes to the orphanige. My favorite part is with mr. chuck. This book is a must read, TOTALY!!!!!!!!

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 63 Customer Reviews

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