Edward Albee (Casebooks on Modern Dramatists Series)

Overview

From the "angry young man" who wrote Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf in 1962, determined to expose the emptiness of American experience to Tiny Alice which reveals his indebtedness to Samuel Beckett and Eugene Ionesco's Theatre of the Absurd, Edward Albee's varied work makes it difficult to label him precisely. Bruce Mann and his contributors approach Albee as an innovator in theatrical form, filling a critical gap in theatrical scholarship.

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Overview

From the "angry young man" who wrote Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf in 1962, determined to expose the emptiness of American experience to Tiny Alice which reveals his indebtedness to Samuel Beckett and Eugene Ionesco's Theatre of the Absurd, Edward Albee's varied work makes it difficult to label him precisely. Bruce Mann and his contributors approach Albee as an innovator in theatrical form, filling a critical gap in theatrical scholarship.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Part of an extensive series of casebooks from the publisher, this ultimately unsatisfying collection was put together after Albee enjoyed a critical revival with Three Tall Women, originally written in 1991 and produced here in 1994. Mann (English, Oakland Univ.) commissioned ten new essays and conducted an interview with Albee, serving both literary and theatrical disciplines. Two pieces are devoted to Three Tall Women: one argues that Albee took his dramatic inspiration from Chekhov, Beckett, and others, and another documents a director's experience working on a summer production of the play. A strong entry on Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? pushes historical analogies further than before, while one on The Zoo Story convincingly argues that the play mirrors Jerry's story in its effect. In addition, a retrospective by Albee critic Anne Paolucci has much to recommend it, especially as it explores the influence of Pirandello, but her essay devotes too much space to Albee's weak, middle-period plays. Although he has some important things to say regarding Malcolm and A Delicate Balance, Robert F. Gross (English & comparative literature, Hobart & William Smith Colls.) depends too much upon term coinage, rendering his contribution quite unappealing. On the whole, this collection needs a better, more sweeping overview and a good discussion of Tiny Alice. Recommended for academic and larger theater collections.-Thomas E. Luddy, Salem State Coll., MA Copyright 2003 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

Meet the Author

Bruce J. Mann is an associate professor and Chair of the English Department at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan. He teaches drama and modern literature and has served as a dramaturg for the university's Meadow Brook Theatre. He has published articles on Tennessee Williams, Eugene O'Neill, Arthur Miller and Sam Shepard.

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Table of Contents

General Editor's Note
Chronology
Introduction 1
1 Three Tall Women: Return to the Muses 6
2 Edward Albee: A Retrospective (and Beyond) 18
3 Absurdly American: Rediscovering the Representation of Violence in The Zoo Story 31
4 "Good, Better, Best, Bested": The Failure of American Typology in Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? 44
5 Like Father, Like Son: The Ciphermale in A Delicate Balance and Malcolm 63
6 Forging Text into Theatre: Edward Albee Directs Box and Quotations from Chairman Mao Tse-Tung 79
7 A Demystified Mystique: All Over and the Fall of the Cult of True Womanhood 92
8 The Lady from Dubuque: Into the Labyrinth 99
9 Postmodernist Tensions in Albee's Recent Plays 107
10 Directing Three Tall Women 119
11 Interview with Edward Albee 129
Contributors 145
Index 147
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2012

    Amazing collection

    Every poem by edward albee. Every story. Every play. Everything. Amen for edward albee. This collection is dedinetly worth the money i spent.

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