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Edward Hopper
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Edward Hopper

by Edward Hopper (Artist), Tomas Llorens (Editor), Didier Ottinger (Text by)
 

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Edward Hopper is as quintessentially American as Jackson Pollock or Andy Warhol. Like them, his imagery has reached far beyond the realm of art to impact on our culture in the broadest terms, so that we see early twentieth-century America through his work, as much as within it. The painter Charles Burchfield attributed Hopper’s success to his

Overview

Edward Hopper is as quintessentially American as Jackson Pollock or Andy Warhol. Like them, his imagery has reached far beyond the realm of art to impact on our culture in the broadest terms, so that we see early twentieth-century America through his work, as much as within it. The painter Charles Burchfield attributed Hopper’s success to his “bold individualism,” declaring that “in him we have regained that sturdy American independence which Thomas Eakins gave us.” Hopper’s art was profoundly of its time, both in its expression of the subtle melancholies of modern life and in its deeply cinematic qualities—perhaps Hopper’s greatest gift was his treatment of light—to which directors from Alfred Hitchcock to Wim Wenders have paid homage.
This volume presents a definitive Hopper monograph. Published for a massive retrospective at the Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza in Madrid, and the Grand Palais in Paris, it approaches Hopper’s relatively small oeuvre in two sections. The first covers the artist’s formative years from approximately 1900 to 1924, examining a selection of sketches, paintings, drawings, illustrations, prints and watercolors, which are considered alongside works by painters that influenced Hopper, such as Winslow Homer, Robert Henri, John Sloan, Edgar Degas and Walter Sickert. The second section considers the years from 1925 onwards, addressing his mature output through chronological but thematic groupings. Comprehensive in its scope, with a wealth of color reproductions, Hopper is the last word on the artist.

Editorial Reviews

Choice - W.L. Whitwell
Ottinger considers sketches, paintings, drawings, illustrations, prints, and watercolors; all are superbly reproduced. Hopper's subject matter is considered in depth, including many interpretations by positive and negative critics... The volume's eight articles represent very perceptive writings about Hopper by various contributors.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
``For all his realism, Hopper was essentially a poet,'' writes Goodrich, and this sumptuous album, a reissue of an out-of-print 1970 monograph, is an incomparable guide to understanding that poetry. Hopper (1882-1967) gravitated to painting lunch counters, nudes in hotel rooms, lighthouses, gas stations, rooftops--underappreciated, nakedly honest figurations of America's heartland. A prophet of loneliness, this laconic individualist captured the anarchy of American cities, the quiet melancholy of small towns and suburbs. Paradoxically, his pictures have a restorative, bracing effect--perhaps, as is suggested here, because of Hopper's emotional attachment to his native environment. The late Goodrich was director of the Whitney Museum in New York and a friend of the artist, whose own comments are interspersed with a refreshingly readable text and more than 200 full-page plates. (Nov.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781935202875
Publisher:
D.A.P./Reunion des Musees Nationaux - Grand Palais
Publication date:
09/30/2012
Pages:
368
Sales rank:
172,910
Product dimensions:
9.90(w) x 11.70(h) x 1.40(d)

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