Edward R. Murrow and the Birth of Broadcast Journalism

( 6 )

Overview

"In Edward R. Murrow and the Birth of Broadcast Journalism, one of America's most celebrated broadcast journalists tells the dramatic and inspiring tale of how America's first and greatest newscaster changed the way we receive, understand, and respond to the news. NPR's Morning Edition host, Bob Edwards, reveals how Murrow pioneered the concepts of radio reports from foreign correspondents, nightly news roundups, and live "you are there" broadcasts. He explains the impact of Murrow's London reports on public opinion, encouraging aid to Britain,
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Overview

"In Edward R. Murrow and the Birth of Broadcast Journalism, one of America's most celebrated broadcast journalists tells the dramatic and inspiring tale of how America's first and greatest newscaster changed the way we receive, understand, and respond to the news. NPR's Morning Edition host, Bob Edwards, reveals how Murrow pioneered the concepts of radio reports from foreign correspondents, nightly news roundups, and live "you are there" broadcasts. He explains the impact of Murrow's London reports on public opinion, encouraging aid to Britain, and how the high standards that he lived by influenced an entire generation of broadcasters." "This brisk and incisive account tracks Murrow's post-war career from the revolutionary television programs See It Now and Person to Person through the legendary 1953 broadcast that helped bring down the Red-baiting Senator Joseph McCarthy, to his many run-ins with his boss, CBS founder and president William Paley. Once close friends, Murrow and Paley clashed repeatedly over the now-familiar conflict between journalistic integrity and corporate profits." "Murrow emerges from these pages as a complex, principled, and driven man who demanded more of himself than he could possibly deliver but, in the process, set a high standard to which those who followed him could aspire. Sadly, Edwards traces the erosion of standards in broadcast journalism since the 1980s - from infotainment magazine programs to vapid and vicious cable talk shows - which he sees as a betrayal of Murrow's legacy." At a time when the network news programs appear to be losing their audience, blanket coverage of sensational stories leaves little time for substantive news, and investigative journalism seems to be a thing of the past, Edward R. Murrow and the Birth of Broadcast Journalism offers a vivid reminder of just how important, informative, and relevant the broadcast news media can and should be.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
* Host of NPR's Morning Edition and author of Fridavs with Red: A Radio Friendship, Edwards paints a colorful portrait of pioneer broadcast journalist Edward R. Murrow. An idealistic educator, Murrow started reporting for the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) during the late 1930s and was assigned to Europe. Along with other foreign correspondents, he established the groundbreaking concept of providing nightly news "roundups" to the listeners back home in America. Long before CNN and embedded journalists existed, Murrow was determined to let his audience experience the events of World War II as they unfolded, as when he joined the Royal Air Force on a mission to drop bombs on Berlin. By incIuding excerpts from transcripts of Murrow's reports, the author lets Murrow speak for himself, giving the reader a sense of his insightfulness and his gift for words. As Edwards emphasizes throughout the book, Murrow continued his crusade to provide quality educational material to the public even when he moved over to television. On the whole this succinct and concise biography, as part of the publisher's Tuming Points series of short works about famous people and events, offers an introduction to Murrow's fascinating career and to the history of broadcast journalism. Suitable for all libraries, especially for high school media centers. —Donna Marie Smith, Palm Beach Ctv. Lib. Syst. FL (Library Journal , May 1, 2004)

Edwards, who has hosted NPR’s Morning Edition since 1979 (though he’s just announced his retirement from that post, as of April 30 of this year), examines the charismatic career and pioneering efforts of renowned newsman Murrow for Wiley’s Turning Points series. Murrow’s broadcasting innovations were indeed significant turning points. Joining CBS in 1935, when radio news usually focused on such preplanned events as parades and flower shows, Murrow ran the network’s European Bureau by 1937 and became a celebrity in 1940 with his stunning rooftop broadcasts of the London Blitz: “Listeners in comfortable living rooms all across the United States were hearing Britons being bombed in real time.” Creating a cadre of WWII correspondents, Murrow flew on 25 combat missions, delivering dramatic reports on everything from the “orchestrated hell” of Berlin to the liberation of Buchenwald’s “living dead.” Mainly remembered for its famed 1954 attack on Joseph McCarthy, Morrow’s groundbreaking TV show See It Now (1951–1958) put field produce rs on location, offering live remotes, split screens, original film footage and unrehearsed interviews at a time other TV news featured only a reading of headlines. Edwards delineates a brief but striking portrait of a “driven man,” a fearless fighter who set such a high standard for himself and others that he became a legend, leaving a lasting impact in newsrooms even after his death in 1965. The book includes excerpts from memorable Murrow broadcasts throughout. (May 7)
Forecast: With more than 10 Turning Points titles now in print, readers may begin to spot this series by its distinctive, standardized cover design. This one is sure to benefit from Edwards’s 14-city author tour. Other forthcoming titles in the series include Sir Martin Gilbert on D-Day. (Publishers Weekly, April 5, 2004)

Publishers Weekly
Edwards, who has hosted NPR's Morning Edition since 1979 (though he's just announced his retirement from that post, as of April 30 of this year), examines the charismatic career and pioneering efforts of renowned newsman Murrow for Wiley's Turning Points series. Murrow's broadcasting innovations were indeed significant turning points. Joining CBS in 1935, when radio news usually focused on such preplanned events as parades and flower shows, Murrow ran the network's European Bureau by 1937 and became a celebrity in 1940 with his stunning rooftop broadcasts of the London Blitz: "Listeners in comfortable living rooms all across the United States were hearing Britons being bombed in real time." Creating a cadre of WWII correspondents, Murrow flew on 25 combat missions, delivering dramatic reports on everything from the "orchestrated hell" of Berlin to the liberation of Buchenwald's "living dead." Mainly remembered for its famed 1954 attack on Joseph McCarthy, Morrow's groundbreaking TV show See It Now (1951-1958) put field producers on location, offering live remotes, split screens, original film footage and unrehearsed interviews at a time other TV news featured only a reading of headlines. Edwards delineates a brief but striking portrait of a "driven man," a fearless fighter who set such a high standard for himself and others that he became a legend, leaving a lasting impact in newsrooms even after his death in 1965. The book includes excerpts from memorable Murrow broadcasts throughout. (May 7) Forecast: With more than 10 Turning Points titles now in print, readers may begin to spot this series by its distinctive, standardized cover design. This one is sure to benefit from Edwards's 14-city author tour. Other forthcoming titles in the series include Sir Martin Gilbert on D-Day. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Host of NPR's Morning Edition and author of Fridays with Red: A Radio Friendship, Edwards paints a colorful portrait of pioneer broadcast journalist Edward R. Murrow. An idealistic educator, Murrow started reporting for the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS) during the late 1930s and was assigned to Europe. Along with other foreign correspondents, he established the groundbreaking concept of providing nightly news "roundups" to the listeners back home in America. Long before CNN and embedded journalists existed, Murrow was determined to let his audience experience the events of World War II as they unfolded, as when he joined the Royal Air Force on a mission to drop bombs on Berlin. By including excerpts from transcripts of Murrow's reports, the author lets Murrow speak for himself, giving the reader a sense of his insightfulness and his gift for words. As Edwards emphasizes throughout the book, Murrow continued his crusade to provide quality educational material to the public even when he moved over to television. On the whole, this succinct and concise biography, as part of the publisher's "Turning Points" series of short works about famous people and events, offers an introduction to Murrow's fascinating career and to the history of broadcast journalism. Suitable for all libraries, especially for high school media centers. Donna Marie Smith, Palm Beach Cty. Lib. Syst., FL Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780471477532
  • Publisher: Turner Publishing Company
  • Publication date: 4/16/2004
  • Series: Turning Points in History Series , #12
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 192
  • Sales rank: 629,679
  • Product dimensions: 5.26 (w) x 8.06 (h) x 0.74 (d)

Meet the Author


BOB EDWARDS is the host of The Bob Edwards show on XM Satellite Radio. From 1979 until 2004, he hosted NPR's Morning Edition.

Bob Edwards has hosted NPR's Morning Edition, the most popular program in all broadcast media, since its premiere in November 1979.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments.

Introduction.

1. Roots.

2. Higher Ed.

3. Anschluss.

4. The Blitz.

5. Over Berlin.

6. Buchenwald.

7. Transition.

8. McCarthy.

9. See It Not.

10. USIA.

Afterword.

Bibliography.

Index.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 7, 2004

    Worth the read

    I knew little about Edward R. Murrow before reading this book. I found it quite interesting to learn about his role in the development of the broadcast industry. We need more like him today.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2004

    definitely a turning point in history!

    A fascinating glimpse at a momentous time in our history and in journalism - I bought a copy for myself and another for my father.

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