×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Edward Weston: Portraits
     

Edward Weston: Portraits

by Edward Weston (Photographer), Susan Morgan (Text by), Cole Weston (Text by)
 

See All Formats & Editions

This monograph is the first published collection of Edward Weston's finest portraits. It shows the artist at this most inspired: vigorously rendering “the very substance, the deeper inner image” of sons, lovers, friends and fellow artists, with such immediacy that they linger in our mind's eye long after viewing. In his lifetime, Weston's

Overview

This monograph is the first published collection of Edward Weston's finest portraits. It shows the artist at this most inspired: vigorously rendering “the very substance, the deeper inner image” of sons, lovers, friends and fellow artists, with such immediacy that they linger in our mind's eye long after viewing. In his lifetime, Weston's photographs were first published in Aperture in 1952. In 1958, upon Weston's death, Nancy Newhall brought his pictures together in a single landmark issue that became known as “The Flame of Recognition.”

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
From light-control to master-printing, Weston meticulously glorified on film nautilus shells, green peppers and household implements. Less famous but impressive in a selection gathered here for the first time are the portraits that made up most of his life's work. Quietly catching on large-format film his models' characters, Weston in the 1920s and '30s expanded existing norms of background and composition in portraying such personalities as D.H. Lawrence, Diego Rivera, Robinson Jeffers, Jo Davidson, Henry Fonda and Ansel Adams, along with his own sons and various friends and associates. Included are several nudes of his protge, model and lover, Tina Modotti, as well as some of his second wife, Charis Wilson. (Nov.)
Library Journal
Aperture. 1995. 96p. photogs. ISBN 0-89381-605-1. $40. PHOTOG Weston's (1886-1958) photographic career began in 1911 and ended in 1948, with the onset of Parkinson's disease. Beaumont Newhall called Weston the founding father of American photography; certainly his straightforward, modernist approach dominated American photography until well after his death. Of these two new books, editor Mora's is the more valuable for history of photography and fine arts collections. His survey presents Weston's life comprehensively and exhaustively than has been attempted in any of the numerous Weston monographs before. The essays offer biographical information and analyze the photographs in the context of what Weston was doing and thinking at the time. Mora (former editor of Les Cahiers de la Photographie) provides an introduction and discusses Weston's work in Mexico; other writers, all well-qualified curators and academics, discuss such topics as Weston's earliest work; his experimental work with nudes and natural forms; and the work Weston did under his two Guggenheim fellowships from 1937 to 1939 (the first ever awarded for photography). The book draws on two major collections: those at the Center for Creative Photography, which has the Weston Archives, and the Lane Collection at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. From about 10,000 images, the book shows 130, 25 percent of which have never before been reproduced. The photographs are arranged chronologically and are grouped to accompany the five essays. The illustrations are fine though not as rich as those in Aperture's Portraits. This serious, scholarly book, with well-written, engaging essays is appropriate for research collections and lay readers alike. Aperture's Edward Weston: Portraits is a less ambitious and more casual presentation of one part of Weston's portfolio, the portraits that earned his keep and comprise 70 percent of his work, according to the book jacket. In the finest reproduction quality, the most familiar portraits of famous artists, writers, and others who featured in Weston's life and work are presented in roughly chronological order. Cole Weston's one-page recollection of his father is warm and anecdotal. Morgan (contributing writer at Elle and Mirabella and author of Martin Munkasci, Aperture, 1992) contributed an essay that will appeal to the informed lay reader rather than to specialists in photography. Weston's life is sketched out, and Morgan tells us about the people who were Weston's portrait subjects and models. However, in contrast to Edward Weston: Forms of Passion, there is little analysis of Weston's developing aesthetic except those thoughts of Weston himself from his Daybooks, quotes from which accompany some of the photographs.Kathleen Collins, New York Transit Museum Archives, Brooklyn

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780893816476
Publisher:
Aperture Foundation
Publication date:
06/28/2005
Series:
Aperture Series
Pages:
96
Product dimensions:
9.67(w) x 11.40(h) x 0.31(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews