Efficiency as a basis for operation and wages by Harrington Emerson | NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
Efficiency as a basis for operation and wages

Efficiency as a basis for operation and wages

by Harrington Emerson
     
 

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This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
Chapter III THE STRENGTH AND WEAKNESS OF EXISTING SYSTEMS OF ORGANIZATION IT is notorious that great aggregations of wealth and power usually do not operate as efficiently as

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This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
Chapter III THE STRENGTH AND WEAKNESS OF EXISTING SYSTEMS OF ORGANIZATION IT is notorious that great aggregations of wealth and power usually do not operate as efficiently as smaller concerns. Nothing in the United States is so gigantically inefficient in proportion to its power and opportunities as the United States Government, equally in what it attempts and in what it fails to attempt. The great industrial and transportation corporations are often very efficient in manipulation, but content with low efficiency of operation, although there are notable exceptions. The great ocean shipbuilding yards from Maine to Virginia, from Puget Sound to the Bay of San Francisco, depend not at all on the internal efficiency (which enables the International Harvester Company, although a thousand miles inland, to export in competition with the whole world), but solely on absolute prohibition of competition and on lavish government appropriations. It is the little American plant manufacturing automobiles, motor boats, or bicycles, making locomotive repair parts, or some other specialty, that defies the competition of the world. The ten-million-dollar and upwards company ought to to be able to supplement every dollar- a-day worker with a two-hundred-thousand-dol- lars-a-year staff of assistants, thereby making the worker four times as effective and gaining a crushing advantage over the smaller concern which cannot afford the same aggregation of specialized knowledge. The great concerns, however, have conspicuously failed to develop this advantage, even if they do have a large staff of experts—a very different thing from a staff organization which gives the least worker the needed direction, stimulus and advice. A two-hundred-thousand-dollar staff for a dollar- a-day man is neither Uto...

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940018409779
Publisher:
New York : The Engineering Magazine
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
263 KB

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Chapter III THE STRENGTH AND WEAKNESS OF EXISTING SYSTEMS OF ORGANIZATION IT is notorious that great aggregations of wealth and power usually do not operate as efficiently as smaller concerns. Nothing in the United States is so gigantically inefficient in proportion to its power and opportunities as the United States Government, equally in what it attempts and in what it fails to attempt. The great industrial and transportation corporations are often very efficient in manipulation, but content with low efficiency of operation, although there are notable exceptions. The great ocean shipbuilding yards from Maine to Virginia, from Puget Sound to the Bay of San Francisco, depend not at all on the internal efficiency (which enables the International Harvester Company, although a thousand miles inland, to export in competition with the whole world), but solely on absolute prohibition of competition and on lavish government appropriations. It is the little American plant manufacturing automobiles, motor boats, or bicycles, making locomotive repair parts, or some other specialty, that defies the competition of the world. The ten-million-dollar and upwards company ought to to be able to supplement every dollar- a-day worker with a two-hundred-thousand-dol- lars-a-year staff of assistants, thereby making the worker four times as effective and gaining a crushing advantage over the smaller concern which cannot afford the same aggregation of specialized knowledge. The great concerns, however, have conspicuously failed to develop this advantage, even if they do have a large staff of experts—a very different thing from a staff organization which gives the least worker the needed direction,stimulus and advice. A two-hundred-thousand-dollar staff for a dollar- a-day man is neither Uto...

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