Efficient Polymorphic Calls

Efficient Polymorphic Calls

by Karel Driesen
     
 
To achieve superior performance, language implementers and computer architects must pay increasingly close attention to polymorphic function calls. Such calls are at the heart of all object-oriented languages, including C++, Smalltalk, and Java.
The implementation of object-oriented languages has been an active topic of research since the 1960s when the first

Overview

To achieve superior performance, language implementers and computer architects must pay increasingly close attention to polymorphic function calls. Such calls are at the heart of all object-oriented languages, including C++, Smalltalk, and Java.
The implementation of object-oriented languages has been an active topic of research since the 1960s when the first Simula compiler was written, and there has been renewed interest in the topic in the early 1980s with the growing popularity of many object-oriented programming languages. Both software and hardware have changed considerably in the interim, to the point where many assumptions based on older studies are no longer valid. Furthermore, today's processors are deeply pipelined and can execute instructions out-of-order, making it difficult to predict the execution time of even simple code sequences. Given the long history of research into the implementation of polymorphic calls and the relatively mature standing it has achieved, Efficient Polymorphic Calls aims to present an up-to-date authoritative guide to the field.
Efficient Polymorphic Calls is a key resource for practitioners building an object-oriented system, who look for fast polymorphic call resolution under particular hardware constraints, graduate students interested in the development of object-oriented systems, and anyone with an interest in programming language implementation at the software or hardware level.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
The programming language constructs called polymorphic calls lie at the heart of increasingly popular object-oriented computer languages such as C++, Java, and Smalltalk. The good news is that they allow for flexible construction of code design unlike procedural computer code that permits only one possible target subroutine. The bad news is that such flexibility requires extra instructions. Driesen (McGill U.), an advocate for object-oriented code becoming the norm, surveys the standard implementation approaches and explains hardware and software techniques for minimizing the run-time cost of polymorphic calls. This update of a doctoral dissertation in computer science (U. of Santa Barbara, 1999) includes a glossary of terms, 112 figures and tables, and appended material. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781461356752
Publisher:
Springer US
Publication date:
04/30/2013
Series:
The Springer International Series in Engineering and Computer Science, #596
Edition description:
Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 2001
Pages:
216
Product dimensions:
6.14(w) x 9.21(h) x 0.51(d)

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