Eggbert, the Slightly Cracked Egg

Eggbert, the Slightly Cracked Egg

4.2 4
by Tom Ross, Rex Barron
     
 

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Cast out of the refrigerator because of a small crack, Eggbert sets out into the world, using his talent for painting to try to blend in. Eventually he realizes that cracks are everywhere and reminds us all that our flaws are perfectly natural.See more details below

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Overview

Cast out of the refrigerator because of a small crack, Eggbert sets out into the world, using his talent for painting to try to blend in. Eventually he realizes that cracks are everywhere and reminds us all that our flaws are perfectly natural.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Vibrant illustrations of life-size eggs and other household items generate excitement in this soft-boiled story. Eggbert, an egg who wears a red beret and carries a palette and brush, enjoys painterly success in the fridge until his egg compatriots discover a crack in his shell. Banished, Eggbert tentatively makes his way through the kitchen, the windowsill and the garden. There's a lag midway as Eggbert camouflages himself in various outdoor scenes, hoping to paint himself into the landscape. Momentum picks up when he accepts his imperfection and travels around the world to see ``famous cracked sights''--a canyon, an island volcano, the Liberty Bell. Ross, creator of the It Zwibble series, doesn't trouble the reader with mundane considerations, namely, that an egg would go from cracked to rotten in short order. Instead, he sustains the fantasy and establishes a point--that a great artist might in fact need to be ``slightly cracked.'' Barron, in his picture book debut, fills every page with warm, undiluted hues and realistic backgrounds. But the eggs are his least credible, most cartoonish creations, largely due to his decision to attach spindly, flesh-tone arms and legs to the solid white torsos. Mischievously touted as a ``Grade A book,'' this rates a Grade B-plus. Ages 4-8. (Mar.)
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-The other eggs in the refrigerator admire Eggbert's remarkable paintings-until they discover that he has a slight crack. Because of his defect, he is banished from his home. At first he uses his artistic talent to attempt to camouflage himself, but his disguises are quickly discovered. Then he realizes that the world contains many lovely cracks. Brush in hand, he travels the globe and produces wonderful paintings of fissures found in things such as volcanoes and the Liberty Bell. Back at the refrigerator, his former friends ponder his hand-painted postcards with amazement and a touch of sadness. The story might be read as a commentary on the lives of artists and/or the dangers and blessings of nonconformity; however, young readers will be more engaged by the illustrations than by philosophical reflections. Eggs and vegetables rarely assume such lifelike expressions and stances, and the simple text and clear design add up to read-aloud potential. Eggbert is an egg worth watching.-Kathy Piehl, Mankato State University, MN
Ilene Cooper
Eggbert is one of the most popular items in the refrigerator, delighting the veggies and the dairy products with his paintings. But one day, Eggbert gets cracked and is forced to leave the fridge. To disguise his crack in the outside world, Eggbert paints himself to look like his surroundings, but just when he's covered himself with flowers or drawn a skyscraper on his back, he's discovered. Then, Eggbert falls and gets cracked so badly, he knows he can't disguise himself anymore. He's cracked but so is the rest of the world, he notices: there are cracks of light in the sky, cracks in the landscape, cracks everywhere. This knowledge frees Eggbert to be the egg he was meant to be: artist and observer of life. Kids can't help but be attracted by the wonderful artwork. The authors have worked for years in animation, and the pictures here are slick, beautifully colored, and brimming with fun. The message is also slick, but it's a useful one that even preschoolers can assimilate. Move over Dancing Raisins, here's Eggbert.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780399224164
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date:
02/01/1994
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.26(w) x 10.24(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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