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Ego, Opinion, Art & Commerce
     

Ego, Opinion, Art & Commerce

5.0 4
by Goo Goo Dolls
 
While a fair number of people only know the Goo Goo Dolls from the passel of sensitive-guy rock ballads they've lodged at the top of the charts in recent years, the Buffalo-bred trio has actually spent the better part of a decade and a half working out the kinks in its working-class rock tone. This wide-ranging collection, while not a "greatest hits" per se -- the

Overview

While a fair number of people only know the Goo Goo Dolls from the passel of sensitive-guy rock ballads they've lodged at the top of the charts in recent years, the Buffalo-bred trio has actually spent the better part of a decade and a half working out the kinks in its working-class rock tone. This wide-ranging collection, while not a "greatest hits" per se -- the absence of the ubiquitous "Iris" puts the kibosh on that notion -- most certainly qualifies as a "best of," seeing as it touches on the musical high points from the full spectrum of the Goos' evolution. Embryonic thrashers like "I'm Addicted" and "Up Yours" (which date back to the late '80s) reveal a streak of guttersnipe punk attitude that's never quite been washed away, while some of the blue-collar jangle-rockers reflect the influence of kindred spirits the Replacements -- most notably "We Are the Normal," which was co-written by that band's Paul Westerberg). But as the 22-song compilation rolls along, what really comes into focus is the trio's unique balance of soul-baring and house-rocking, which stems from the yin-yang combination of singer/guitarist John Rzeznik (the band's most public face) and bassist/singer Robbie Takac. The confluence of edgier tracks like "Flat Top" and more wistful tunes like "Name" and "Girl Right Next to Me" works because there's seldom an emotional or sonic segregation: Like most good things in life, the Goos' songs are deceptively nuanced but never complicated enough to make you give up trying to get inside.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
It's hard to discern what exactly the purpose of Ego, Opinion, Art & Commerce is. It's a compilation, boasting remixes and remastered tracks, but it misses all of the Goo Goo Dolls' biggest hits. So, the best guess for its reason to be is to provide latter-day fans with a basic idea of what the Goos were about before "Iris" and "Name" -- and, if that's the case, its release in 2001 is a little puzzling, since it's been years since they've broken through into the mainstream. In any case, this isn't a bad disc at all, since it does cherry-pick the Goos' albums rather gracefully, balancing almost-hits like "We Are the Normal" with a good selection of album tracks. Still, the audience for this must be pretty small -- not the hardcore fans, since they already have all this, but fans of the early stuff won't need it, nor will the really casual fans, who just want the hits, since they're not here. So, it's for the listener that either wants an overview of the early years -- and it's good at that -- or for the listener that has "Name" and "Iris" and wants to dig deeper, without getting the actual albums. Small audiences in both respects, but for those that belong to that audience, it's a good bet.

Product Details

Release Date:
05/29/2001
Label:
Warner Bros / Wea
UPC:
0093624794523
catalogNumber:
47945

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Ego, Opinion, Art & Commerce 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Simply amazing. A great collection of songs by the Goos. They have so much talent and are so much deeper than the Top 40 hits they've had. Be on the lookout for their next single, ''Big Machine'' from their Gutterflower CD.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This CD of re-released material is such a great idea. Sometimes when you find a band you absolutely love and you go out and buy all their older stuff only to discove it's not really what you expected and you realize why they havn't made it big until now. Well that doesn't apply to the dolls. Everything they have done is awesome! The first four tracks are from their hugely successful "Dizzy UP the Girl" then contains four or five songs from their previous records going all the way back to their first. This way you get a feel for what they sounded like in the beginning and what they have evolved into today. At the fifth song "Naked" the style changes dramatically into punk. You can just picture them with really long hair and ripped up jeans. So,if you want to preview some of thier older material before you go get their albums I strongly recommend this CD.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Although it was put out to placate the thirst of hardcore Goo fans like myself who were waiting ever so patiently for the release of the next studio album, the Goo's did not fail to wow their fans with Ego, Opinion, Art and Commerce. The fact that they all but ignored their hits such as Iris, Name, Black Balloon and Slide shows to me that they belive the rest of their music is good enough to listen to, aswell. And it certainly is. The remix of Acoustic #3 is, if not better, at least as good as the original. Amigone, We Are the Normal, Naked and Girl Right Next to Me have always been some of my favorites, and I am very glad that they chose to include them in this compilation album. It also makes me happy to see some of Robbie's stuff on here, too. Johnny is a phenomenal musician and songwriter, (Especially with the strange, yet relaxing open tunings that tend to break guitar strings) but most people don't realize that Robbie was the original spotlight to the group, and I'm happy to see some of his songs on here. This album also offers something that even the hardcore fans sometimes don't even get a chance to hear: a track off of their out-of-print self-titled debut album. In short, this is not only a Goo Goo Dolls culture album, or just a learning experience, or just a phenomenal album that follows their career from 'Goo Goo Dolls' to 'Dizzy Up the Girl' and follows their evolution as a band without the distractions of their mega-hits, it is all of the above, and I wish the Goo Goo Dolls the best of luck in the future.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago