Egyptian Tomb: The Tomb of Nebamun

Overview

The stories and secrets of the finest tomb paintings from ancient Egypt.

An Egyptian Tomb examines fragments of the remarkable wall paintings found in the tomb of Nebamun, a government official living in the Egyptian city of Thebes almost 3,500 years ago. Like the pharaohs, he wanted a beautiful tomb where his body would be kept safely after he died. Nebamun, whose job was to pay workers in grain, was neither important nor rich. Working for the government, however, he knew the ...

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Overview

The stories and secrets of the finest tomb paintings from ancient Egypt.

An Egyptian Tomb examines fragments of the remarkable wall paintings found in the tomb of Nebamun, a government official living in the Egyptian city of Thebes almost 3,500 years ago. Like the pharaohs, he wanted a beautiful tomb where his body would be kept safely after he died. Nebamun, whose job was to pay workers in grain, was neither important nor rich. Working for the government, however, he knew the right people and made the right connections. So he had a superb tomb built for his remains.

Meredith Hooper describes the many details of the construction of Nebamun's tomb and its vivid, story-telling decorations. Photographs of the tomb's walls and artifacts reveal the remarkable skill of Egyptian craftsmen. Hieroglyphics describe Nebamun "enjoying himself, looking at good things." Other detailed illustrations reflect the hopes Nebamun had for his afterlife: enjoying a party with family and friends, hunting in the desert, and being with his daughter and his cat.

An Egyptian Tomb features photographs of the artifacts and tomb fragments that are held in the British Museum's Egyptology collection, considered the world's finest. Children will be fascinated by the stories and secrets held in the walls of this tomb, and will appreciate Nebamun's wish for a happy afterlife.

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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal

Gr 3-5- "Nebamun wasn't very important. He wasn't very rich. But he knew the right people." His sumptuous 3500-year-old tomb is now lost but, focusing on surviving fragments from its walls that are now in the British Museum, Hooper offers engaging insights into how ancient Egyptian tomb paintings were created, and also how to understand what is going on in them. Illustrated with close-up color photos and speculative cutaway floor plans, plus views of goods and paintings from other tombs of the same period, this quick study will be useful for history and culture assignments, and as an effective enhancer of art-appreciation skills.-John Peters, New York Public Library

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781554073740
  • Publisher: Firefly Books, Limited
  • Publication date: 2/15/2008
  • Pages: 32
  • Age range: 10 - 13 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.10 (w) x 10.30 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Meredith Hooper is an award-winning historian and full-time writer of non-fiction and fiction. She is the author of many books for children on a wide variety of topics, including Who Built the Pyramids and Pebble in My Pocket.

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Read an Excerpt

Who was Nebamun?

Nebamun was an official in the Temple of Amun in the city of Thebes, beside the river Nile. He lived nearly 3,500 years ago in ancient Egypt.

The people who knew how to read and write in Egypt were called scribes. There were few of them — most people could not read or write. Nebamun was a scribe. He kept a record of the grain grown on the Temple's farms. Grain was like money. Nebamun paid people for their work in grain.

Nebamun wanted a beautiful tomb where his body would be kept safely after he died. Nebamun wasn't very important. He wasn't very rich. But he knew the right people.

Hacking a room out of solid rock is very expensive. Getting the best artists to paint pictures on the walls costs a lot.

Nebamun paid for two rooms wide enough to stretch out his arms without touching the walls, and high enough not to bump his head on the ceiling. The artists covered the walls with paintings of Nebamun being busy, and happy. They painted his family and friends, and some of the people who worked for him.

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Table of Contents

Who was Nebamun?
Making and painting Nebamun's tomb-chapel
The finished tomb-chapel and burial chamber
The 'city of the dead'
The meaning of the paintings
Hunting in the marshes
A secret and a mystery
Food and drink
The party
Inspecting the geese and cattle
Inspecting the fields and farms
Egyptian ideas about painting
The tomb of Nebamun
Index

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