Eighteenth-Century Fiction on Screen

Overview

Offering an extensive introduction to cinematic representations of classic fiction of the eighteenth century, this study sheds new light on the process of converting prose fiction into film. The contributors provide a variety of theoretical and critical approaches to the process of bringing literary works to the screen. They consider a broad range of film and television adaptations, including several versions of Robinson Crusoe and adaptations of Gulliver's Travels, Clarissa and Tom Jones. This book appeals to ...

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Overview

Offering an extensive introduction to cinematic representations of classic fiction of the eighteenth century, this study sheds new light on the process of converting prose fiction into film. The contributors provide a variety of theoretical and critical approaches to the process of bringing literary works to the screen. They consider a broad range of film and television adaptations, including several versions of Robinson Crusoe and adaptations of Gulliver's Travels, Clarissa and Tom Jones. This book appeals to students of literature and film alike.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"...a refreshing contribution to the field of film and literature...a 'must read' for anyone interested in cinematic interpretations of eighteenth-century literature." Canadian Woman Studies
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780521529105
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication date: 8/28/2010
  • Pages: 242
  • Product dimensions: 5.98 (w) x 9.02 (h) x 0.55 (d)

Meet the Author

Robert Mayer is Associate Professor of English at Oklahoma State University. He is the author of History and the Early English Novel: Matters of Fact from Bacon to Defoe (Cambridge, 1997).

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Table of Contents

Illustrations; Introduction: Is there a text in the screening room? Robert Mayer; 1. The cinema of attractions and the novel in Barry Lyndon and Tom Jones Peter Cosgrove; 2. Three cinematic Robinsonades Robert Mayer; 3. Adaptations of Moll Flanders Catherine N. Parke; 4. Film, censorship, and the 'corrupt original' of Gulliver's Travels Alan Chalmers; 5. Adapting Fielding for film and television Martin C. Battestin; 6. The spaces of Clarissa in text and film Cynthia Wall; 7. Jacques le fataliste on film: from metafiction to metacinema Alan J. Singerman; 8. 'Carnal to the point of scandal': on the affair of La religieuse Kevin Jackson; 9. Adaptations and cultural criticism: Les liaisons dangereuses 1960 and Dangerous Liaisons Richard Frohock; 10. Mapping Goethe's Wilhelm Meister onto Wenders's Wrong Move Margaret McCarthy; 11. Rob Roy: the other eighteenth century? Janet Sorensen; Filmography; Bibliography.

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