Eisenhower and Churchill: The Partnership That Saved the World

Overview

Although born and raised more than an ocean apart, Dwight Eisenhower and Winston Churchill—the two titans of the greatest generation—led remarkably parallel lives whose paths would intersect during history's most harrowing days. Through their youth, education, and military training, both men experienced similar triumphs and failures that shaped their lives, though they met only for the first time upon the eve of war in 1941.
Eisenhower and Churchill tells the magnificent story ...
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Eisenhower and Churchill: The Partnership That Saved the World

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Overview

Although born and raised more than an ocean apart, Dwight Eisenhower and Winston Churchill—the two titans of the greatest generation—led remarkably parallel lives whose paths would intersect during history's most harrowing days. Through their youth, education, and military training, both men experienced similar triumphs and failures that shaped their lives, though they met only for the first time upon the eve of war in 1941.
Eisenhower and Churchill tells the magnificent story of these two great leaders and their exemplary partnership in war and peace. Through enlivened pages and fascinating anecdotes, author James C. Humes illuminates the human side of each man, who had more in common with each other than a world war. You'll discover the extraordinary stories of how both were born to domineering mothers and failed fathers, both did not qualify for the military academy on the first try, both were traumatized by experiences in World War I, both were talented writers, and both lost a child in the very same year (1921). Remarkably, each man did not warm to the other at first; but as they worked together, their respect for one another grew to become a powerful friendship that lived long after the echoes of war had receded into the past.
As allies, they shared a hatred for tyranny and led the world through the greatest war of the twentieth century. As friends, they shared a sense of trust and cooperation that should be raised as a standard. Containing new research and memorable insights, Eisenhower and Churchill brings to life the two lions of the twentieth centruy.
"Who would not welcome an intimate book about Churchill and Eisenhower, and who is better situated to write it than Professor Humes, who knew them both, and studiously—and ardently—records their careers and their friendship?"
William F. Buckley Jr.
"James C. Humes's Eisenhower and Churchill is a wonderful dual biography laced with lively anecdotes, engaging prose, and shrewd analysis. A truly welcome addition to our growing literature on the Second World War."
Douglas Brinkley, professor of history and director of the Eisenhower Center, University of New Orleans

From the Hardcover edition.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Who would not welcome an intimate book about Churchill and Eisenhower, and who is better situated to write it than Professor Humes, who knew them both, and studiously—and ardently—records their careers and their friendship."
—WILLIAM F. BUCKLEY JR.

"James C. Humes's Eisenhower and Churchill is a wonderful dual biography laced with lively anecdotes, engaging prose, and shrewd analysis. A truly welcome addition to our growing literature on the Second World War."
—DOUGLAS BRINKLEY, professor of history and director of the Eisenhower Center, University of New Orleans

"In the twentieth century, to two men did more than Winston Churchill and Dwight Eisenhower to combat the twin evils of tyranny: facism and communism... If Churchill was the voice of freedom, Eisenhower provided the implementing hands."
—DAVID EISENHOWER, from the foreword

From the Hardcover edition.

Publishers Weekly
Though Humes was briefly a staffer in the Eisenhower White House, his book is unreliable as fact and as florid as an after-dinner speech. Much more than half the narrative is a compilation of unrelated parallels and coincidences in the lives of his two subjects, who met only after Pearl Harbor. Their relationship materialized when Eisenhower was assigned to lead Anglo-American forces in the invasion of North Africa, a follow-up in Sicily and then the D-Day operation, which Churchill had long resisted. Rather than a partnership, their relationship was one of a veteran politician who fancied himself a strategist, and a shrewd general who was politic enough to organize a collection of egos into executing vast military operations. While Churchill wanted to keep Russia out of what he considered British spheres of influence and to prevent a doomed British Empire from disintegrating, Eisenhower's orders from President Roosevelt were to win the war. Eisenhower's confident serenity and stubborn affability were keys to his success in keeping Churchill focused on common goals. While the subtitle claims much more than Humes (a professor of language and leadership at the University of Southern Colorado and author of Nixon's Ten Commandments of Leadership and Negotiation) delivers, the text is equally flawed, replete with hasty judgments, suspect political bias and numerous factual errors. Eisenhower, for example, did not racially integrate the army: Truman did. Rather, we have FDR's "New Deal crowd" and Truman's "deficit populism." Churchill's support for Eisenhower is claimed to be the reason he was selected to command the North Africa invasion. Names are wrong; anecdotes become fact; Ike even turnsto medicine, it seems, having "supervised the recovery" of Churchill from pneumonia. The lack of source notes underscores that no one should take this book seriously as history. Illus. and foreword by David Eisenhower not seen by PW. (Oct.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
Humes (leadership and language, Univ. of Southern Colorado; Nixon's Ten Commandments of Leadership and Negotiation) begins by citing similarities between the early development of Eisenhower and Churchill. Both men had fathers who were irresponsible and mothers who were consequently strong. Both were rejected at their respective service academies on the first attempt to gain admittance. Surprisingly, Churchill initially disliked Eisenhower, though later the two men became good friends. This book is largely concerned with their friendship, and readers expecting an in-depth treatment of either man should look at the larger biographies, e.g., Stephen E. Ambrose's Eisenhower (Vol. 1, LJ 9/1/83; Vol. 2, LJ 9/15/84) and William Manchester's The Last Lion, Winston Churchill (Vol. 1, LJ 5/1/83; Vol. 2, LJ 11/1/88). Although largely anecdotal and not meant to be comprehensive, Humes's work will provide a good general background for readers who are interested in the historic partnership. Recommended for both public and academic libraries. Mark Ellis, Albany State Univ., GA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307335883
  • Publisher: Crown Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 10/28/2001
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.66 (d)

Meet the Author

James C. Humes, a professor of language and leadership at the University of Southern Colorado, is the author of numerous books, including Nixon's Ten Commandments of Leadership and Negotiation, Confessions of a White House Ghostwriter, and The Wit and Wisdom of Winston Churchill. He served briefly in Eisenhower's White House and was a speaker, in London, for ceremonies commemorating Churchill's 125th birthday. Mr. Humes lives in Pueblo, Colorado.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Table of Contents

Foreword vii
Acknowledgments xiii
Prologue: St. Paul's Cathedral, London, 1965 1
1 Blenheim Palace 17
2 Abilene 29
3 Sandhurst 41
4 West Point 49
5 The House of Commons 57
6 Fort Sam Houston 67
7 The Admiralty 75
8 Camp Colt, Gettysburg 85
9 The War Department 91
10 Camp Gaillard, Panama 99
11 11 Downing Street 109
12 Malacanan Palace, The Philippines 119
13 Chartwell 129
14 Fort Sam Lewis, Washington 143
15 10 Downing Street 149
16 La Maison Blanche, Algiers 161
17 Telegraph Cottage, England 179
18 Columbia University 205
19 The White House 227
Epilogue: London 255
Bibliography 259
Index 262
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