El Gran Pueblo: A History of Greater Mexico / Edition 3

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Overview

Based on the belief that people—not institutions—make history, this book looks at the challenges that the Mexican people have faced since independence, and tells the story of their resiliency and creative character during the years of political and economic change, resulting in a book that reveals the Mexican experience not only in Mexico, but in what is today the southwestern United States. Topically, this book examines national boundaries not as barriers, but as the setting of complex interactions resulting in the convergence of cultures. It discusses the Mexican experience according to the major political, economic, cultural, and social watersheds that have occurred through time. For employees in corporations and businesses that deal with Mexican trade, as it provides understanding of the Mexican people and their culture.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780131841147
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 10/7/2003
  • Series: MySearchLab Series for History Series
  • Edition description: REV
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 535
  • Product dimensions: 5.98 (w) x 8.81 (h) x 1.18 (d)

Read an Excerpt

Mexicans, in some ways, have remade their national administration by electing an opposition president for the first time in a century. Vicente Fox, after winning the office in 2000, has made some headway against the national challenges of political corruption, economic stagnation, and drug associated crime. This new president and new enthusiasm notwithstanding, Mexicans, find themselves in the early twenty-first century faced with many old difficulties and stagnant institutions. The struggle against corruption, if it is ever is to escape its Sisyphusian legacy, must become a struggle against corrupt public officials and the campaign to revitalize institutional inertia requires inspired individuals eager to invigorate such disregarded units as the national congress and the Mexico City police. Both of these latter examples are currently beginning to show new life, the deputies in the preparation of an independent national budget and the police with a new cadre of responsible officers determined to reduce crime. Nevertheless, indigenous demands, migrant issues, and national poverty demand immediate attention at the same time that Fox nurtures his rather fragile regime.

As in the second edition, we recognize the assistance of numerous colleagues. Again, we received considerate help in interpreting recent events in Mexico from Rod Camp, the Philip M. McKenna Professor at Claremont McKenna College, and David Lorey, senior fellow at the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. We have been challenged to rethink the history of Mexico since independence by our recent graduate students, especially James Garza at TCU, Dina Berger, Monica Rankin, Glenn Avent, and Rachel Kram Villarreal at the University of Arizona, and Bill Connell, Christoph Rosemuller, and Lisa Edwards at Tulane University. Moreover, the faculty, distinguished lecturers, and the Fellows of the Oaxaca Summer Institute (I-V) have had an indelible imprint on our interpretations. In particular, John Hart, Gil Joseph, and Alan Knight have challenged our earlier views. We express our gratitude to friends, who are also our professional colleagues in Mexico City, especially Carmen Nava, Guillermo Palacios, Javier Garciadiego, Josefma Vazquez, and Norma Mereles de Ogarrio. We also acknowledge the Oaxaca team of Francisco Jose Ruiz C. (Paco Pepe), Anselmo Arellanes, Carlos Sanchez Silva, Victor Raul Martinez, and Daniela Traffano and reviewers Ben W. Fallaw of Eastern Illinois University and Barbara M. Corbett of Amherst College. We hope those who have discussed this textbook with us will recognize the ways we have appropriated their advice.

Colin M. MacLachlan New Orleans

William H. Beezley Tucson

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Table of Contents

Introduction.

1. Collapse and Survival.

2. Centrifugal Forces.

3. Liberalism Defined.

4. Porfirio Díaz Triumphant.

5. The Porfiriato.

6. Prelude to Revolution.

7. Making a Revolution: The Borderlands Emerge, 1905—1917.

8. Making a Revolution Work: Part I, 1917—1927.

9. Making a Revolution Work: Part II, 1927—1937.

10. The Revolution Becomes the Miracle, 1937—1946.

11. The Miracle: Its Zenith and Decline, 1946—1972.

12. After the Miracle: “A Day Without the Revolution, 1972—1996.”

Converging Cultures: New Century, New President.

Glossary.

Bibliography.

Index.

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Preface

Mexicans, in some ways, have remade their national administration by electing an opposition president for the first time in a century. Vicente Fox, after winning the office in 2000, has made some headway against the national challenges of political corruption, economic stagnation, and drug associated crime. This new president and new enthusiasm notwithstanding, Mexicans, find themselves in the early twenty-first century faced with many old difficulties and stagnant institutions. The struggle against corruption, if it is ever is to escape its Sisyphusian legacy, must become a struggle against corrupt public officials and the campaign to revitalize institutional inertia requires inspired individuals eager to invigorate such disregarded units as the national congress and the Mexico City police. Both of these latter examples are currently beginning to show new life, the deputies in the preparation of an independent national budget and the police with a new cadre of responsible officers determined to reduce crime. Nevertheless, indigenous demands, migrant issues, and national poverty demand immediate attention at the same time that Fox nurtures his rather fragile regime.

As in the second edition, we recognize the assistance of numerous colleagues. Again, we received considerate help in interpreting recent events in Mexico from Rod Camp, the Philip M. McKenna Professor at Claremont McKenna College, and David Lorey, senior fellow at the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. We have been challenged to rethink the history of Mexico since independence by our recent graduate students, especially James Garza at TCU, Dina Berger, Monica Rankin, Glenn Avent, and Rachel Kram Villarreal at the University of Arizona, and Bill Connell, Christoph Rosemuller, and Lisa Edwards at Tulane University. Moreover, the faculty, distinguished lecturers, and the Fellows of the Oaxaca Summer Institute (I-V) have had an indelible imprint on our interpretations. In particular, John Hart, Gil Joseph, and Alan Knight have challenged our earlier views. We express our gratitude to friends, who are also our professional colleagues in Mexico City, especially Carmen Nava, Guillermo Palacios, Javier Garciadiego, Josefma Vazquez, and Norma Mereles de Ogarrio. We also acknowledge the Oaxaca team of Francisco Jose Ruiz C. (Paco Pepe), Anselmo Arellanes, Carlos Sanchez Silva, Victor Raul Martinez, and Daniela Traffano and reviewers Ben W. Fallaw of Eastern Illinois University and Barbara M. Corbett of Amherst College. We hope those who have discussed this textbook with us will recognize the ways we have appropriated their advice.

Colin M. MacLachlan
New Orleans

William H. Beezley
Tucson

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