The El Paso Chile Company Rum and Tiki Cookbook

The El Paso Chile Company Rum and Tiki Cookbook

by W. P. Kerr
     
 

Rum is hot. Rum is cool. Rum can be sipped, savored, and cooked in ways limited only by your imagination. Rum has an island flavor on its own over ice with a wedge of lime, or it can be something more, as it is in these sophisticated recipes by W. Park Kerr, author of The El Paso Chile Company Margarita Cookbook.

Rumba over to the bar and break out your

Overview

Rum is hot. Rum is cool. Rum can be sipped, savored, and cooked in ways limited only by your imagination. Rum has an island flavor on its own over ice with a wedge of lime, or it can be something more, as it is in these sophisticated recipes by W. Park Kerr, author of The El Paso Chile Company Margarita Cookbook.

Rumba over to the bar and break out your cocktail shaker and hula-girl glasses. Whether you are looking for a classic rum drink like a pina colada or a mai tai or a new concoction such as a Banana Monkey or a Blue Lagoon, The El Paso Chile Company Rum & Tiki Cookbook offers the ultimate rum recipes in these tropically colorful pages. Want to add some punch to the rest of your party? Recipes include Luau Baby Back Ribs, Grilled Coconut-Rum Shrimp with Curried Peanut Dipping Sauce, and other spiked suggestions for marinades, sauces, and main dishes. And be sure to save room for dessert. There's Island Spice Flan and a Pineapple and Bananas Foster. Not sure which type of rum—light, gold, dark, or beyond—to use? It's all explained in one user-friendly section.

So if you don't want your next party to end up ho-hum, try a little rum.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Kerr's The El Paso Chile Company Margarita Cookbook (1999) offered recipes for all sorts of variations on that ever-popular drink; this year, he's turned to pi a coladas, mai tais, and other exotic rum drinks, with a few recipes for rum-flavored appetizers, main course, and desserts thrown in for good measure. "Rum 101" lessons provide suggestions for variations, information on ingredients, and esoterica, and there are color photos throughout. For any beverage collection. Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.\

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688177607
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
04/05/2000
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
112
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.47(d)

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

My Daiquiri

Makes 1 Cocktail

This best known of rum drinks is generally attributed to one Jennings Cox, a mining engineer stationed in Santiago, Cuba, in the sizzling summer of 1898. While he may have originally concocted it to fight off malarial infection (the rum) and scurvy (the lime), a properly made Daiquiri these days is not, in the strict sense, medicinal. My semiclassic version is potent and more than a little reminiscent of my other favorite cocktail, the Margarita. To transform this into another classic cocktail, the Bacardi, add 1 teaspoon grenadine.

A wedge of lime
Granulated sugar on a small plate
3 ounces gold rum
1 1/2 ounces fresh lime juice
1 1/2 teaspoons superfine sugar
1 teaspoon curacao or other orange liqueur

Run the lime wedge around the rim of a stemmed cocktail glass. Dip the moistened rim in the sugar on the plate. Set the lime wedge and the glass aside.

In a cocktail shaker, combine the rum, lime juice, superfine sugar, and curacao. Stir with a long spoon to dissolve the sugar. Add ice cubes to fill the shaker about half full and shake well.

Half-fill the prepared glass with crushed ice if desired. Strain the Daiquiri into the glass, squeeze the lime wedge into the cocktail, discard, and serve immediately.

Rum 101 As rum comes from sugar, so it goes to sugar. You may not normally sweeten your cocktails, but I think you'll find that, when it comes to rum, a little sugar, especially when lime juice is present, nicely balances the flavor.


Rum Jerked Chicken Wings

Makes 4 to 6 Servings

Fiery hot and smoky, grilled chicken, pork, and other meats make up the Jamaicannational street dish known as "jerk." Jerk is the marinade, packed with various big Caribbean flavors, not the least of which are rum, allspice, and the ultra-hot chiles known as Scotch bonnets. (These chiles are extremely hot, so handle them with care, and use gloves if possible.) More readily available habanero chiles are close cousins, and add their unique and fruity heat to these addictively spicy chicken wing drumettes.

3/4 cup chopped yellow onion
1/3 cup chopped scallion
2 Scotch bonnet or habanero chiles, to taste, stemmed and chopped
3 tablespoons dark rum
2 1/2 tablespoons grated fresh ginger with juice
2 1/2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons packed dark brown sugar
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoon Pickapeppa Sauce
3/4 teaspoon ground allspice
1/4 teaspoon dry thyme, crumbled
3 pounds chicken wing drumettes

In a food processor, combine the yellow onion, scallion, chiles, rum, ginger, soy sauce, sugar, lime juice, olive oil, Pickapeppa, allspice, and thyme. Process until fairly smooth.

In a nonreactive dish, combine the onion mixture and the drumettes and marinate at room temperature for 1 hour.

Light a charcoal fire and let it burn down or preheat a gas grill (medium-low). Lay the drumettes on the rack, reserving the marinade. Grill the drumettes, turning and basting them often, until they are tender and well browned and the marinade is used up, 25 to 30 minutes. Serve hot or warm.

Meet the Author

W. Park Kerr is a ninth-generation Texan and the founder of The El Paso Chile Company, a premium Southwest food business. Kerr produces and appears in a nationally syndicated television food show called Let's Get Cooking. He believes that West Texas is the finest place on earth to cook and eat.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >