Eldest (Inheritance Cycle Series #2)

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Overview

Darkness Falls…Swords Clash…Evil Reigns.

Eragon and his dragon, Saphira, have just saved the rebel state from destruction by the mighty forces of King Galbatroix, cruel ruler of the Empire. Now Eragon must travel to Ellesméra, land of the elves, for further training in magic and swordsmanship, the vital skills of the Dragon Rider. It is a journey of a lifetime, filled with awe-inspiring new places and people, each day a fresh adventure. But ...

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Eldest (Inheritance Cycle Series #2)

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Overview

Darkness Falls…Swords Clash…Evil Reigns.

Eragon and his dragon, Saphira, have just saved the rebel state from destruction by the mighty forces of King Galbatroix, cruel ruler of the Empire. Now Eragon must travel to Ellesméra, land of the elves, for further training in magic and swordsmanship, the vital skills of the Dragon Rider. It is a journey of a lifetime, filled with awe-inspiring new places and people, each day a fresh adventure. But chaos and betrayal plague him at every turn, and Eragon isn’t sure whom he can trust.

Also available in the Eldest/Eragon hardcover boxed set!

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Eldest, the shelf-bending sequel to Christopher Paolini's wildly acclaimed debut novel, Eragon (and the second volume in his Inheritance trilogy), continues the epic saga of Eragon and Saphira. The teenage boy and his blue-scaled dragon are destined to free the realm of Alagaësia from the clutches of the ruthless king Galbatorix -- or die trying. Even though Eragon and his misfit alliance of rebels have won minor victories against the nightmarish minions of the Empire, he realizes that without more training, he will never be able to defeat Galbatorix and his dark magic. With that in mind, he sets off for the awe-inspiring land of the elves on a quest to complete his education as a Dragon Rider. Like J. K. Rowling's Harry Potter saga, Paolini's epic fantasy -- although categorized as children's literature (for readers 12 and up) -- has attracted not only adult fantasy fans but also mainstream fiction readers. Paolini's fluid writing style, abundance of compelling characters, and utilization of age-transcendent themes like honor, friendship, responsibility, and forgiveness, will make this saga a huge hit with teachers and librarians, as well as lovers of dragon-powered fantasy à la Anne McCaffrey and Ursula K. Le Guin. The 650-plus pages of Tolkienesque adventure will almost certainly leave readers salivating for the third and final installment. Paul Goat Allen
Publishers Weekly
Narrator Gerard Doyle picks up where he left off narrating Eragon by Christopher Paolini, with its follow-up, Eldest. Again lending his assured, compelling delivery to the proceedings, Brit Doyle relates the continuing adventures of dragon-rider Eragon and his dragon, Saphira, now in Ellesmera, land of the elves. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Criticas

The second volume in Paolini’s popular “Inheritance Trilogy” continues the story begun in Eragon . Eragon the dragon rider and Saphira, his dragon, are being trained in the forest city of Ellesmera while Roran, Eragon’s cousin, helps the villagers escape Carvahall and flee the siege by the Ra’zacs. There is a large cast of characters and complex story lines, and listeners must be familiar with the first novel before beginning this sequel. But the clear narration of this abridgment makes the plot easy to follow, and little is lost in the production. Though there is not much differentiation in the characters’ voices, it is always apparent who is speaking. The recording is evenly paced, the sound clean and clear, and the Spanish straightforward and smooth. Overall, this is a worthwhile addition to larger Spanish-language audio collections.
—Roxanne Landin

Children's Literature
There is something remarkable about the Inheritance trilogy, aside from the intricate plot and meticulously built fantasy world. It's the age of the creator. Paolini became a New York Times bestselling author at nineteen when he wrote the first book in the series "Eragon." His home schooling has served him well and his parents deserve a big thumbs-up. In this second installment of the series, Eragon and his dragon, Saphira, travel to the elven city Ellesmera where both must train in the ways of the dragon riders, a group on the brink of extinction. A reign of evil threatens to dominant the region and life as it has existed. Politics and romance lay at the forefront of events, as Eragon comes to grips with his future and the heavy burdens he must bear. Eragon goes through a major transition on his way to maturity, a necessity to survive an overwhelming foe in the finale's epic battle. The story is richly detailed in parts, logically laying down elements of magic and folklore. This weaving of old world history and modern fantasy works well, allowing us to see Paolini's personal grasp of literary elements and how nature works. This is a series worth reading but it is important to begin with the first book in the series. The linear plot unfolds one section at a time, like the layers of an onion, leaving the reader wanting to know more. 2005, Random House Children's Books, Ages 12 up.
—Robyn Gioia
KLIATT
Readers who have been waiting two years for the release of Paolini's second installment in the Inheritance Trilogy will not be disappointed. The story picks up where Eragon left off, at the end of the battle at Farthen Dur. Eragon is now called Shadeslayer, and he has faced a mighty challenge that has changed him forever. After the leadership of the Varden changes hands, Eragon travels on to Ellesmera with Saphira to continue his training as a rider. Among the elves, he learns more about his power and about himself. In the meantime, Carvahall has been attacked. The villagers put up a brave defense, but ultimately they cannot hold out, and Katrina, Roran's betrothed, is kidnapped by the Ra'zac. Roran knows that Carvahall will fall and he asks the villagers to follow him to Surda, where he hopes to discover the whereabouts of the Ra'zac and Katrina. In parallel story lines and groups of alternating chapters, Roran and Eragon move closer to each other, finally meeting as another dragon and rider drop from the sky. As volume two ends, Eragon and Roran join forces to defeat the Empire and avenge the deaths of their loved ones. Paolini's lush writing and close attention to detail make this epic flow effortlessly, leaving readers to wait impatiently again for the third and final book of the trilogy. (Book Two of Inheritance Trilogy). KLIATT Codes: JS*—Exceptional book, recommended for junior and senior high school students. 2005, Random House, Knopf, 684p. illus., Ages 12 to 18.
—Michele Winship
KLIATT - Michele Winship
To quote the review of the hardcover in KLIATT, September 2005: The story picks up where Eragon left off, at the end of the battle at Farthen Dur. Eragon is now called Shadeslayer, and he has faced a mighty challenge that has changed him forever. After the leadership of the Varden changes hands, Eragon travels on to Ellesmera with Saphira to continue his training as a rider. Among the elves, he learns more about his power and about himself. In the meantime, Carvahall has been attacked. The villagers put up a brave defense, but ultimately they cannot hold out, and Katrina, Roran's betrothed, is kidnapped by the Ra'zac. Roran knows that Carvahall will fall and he asks the villagers to follow him to Surda, where he hopes to discover the whereabouts of the Ra'zac and Katrina. In parallel story lines and groups of alternating chapters, Roran and Eragon move closer to each other, finally meeting as another dragon and rider drop from the sky. As volume two ends, Eragon and Roran join forces to defeat the Empire and avenge the deaths of their loved ones. Paolini's lush writing and close attention to detail make this epic flow effortlessly.
School Library Journal
Gr 5 Up-Eragon and his dragon, Saphira, have survived the battle at Tronjheim, but their challenges are not over. Galbatorix, the corrupt emperor, still rules Alagaesia and is looking for them. The magically bonded pair must help the rebellious Varden regroup after their leader is slain. Eragon helps deal with the resulting diplomatic complexities and then leaves for Du Weldenvarden, the home of the Elves, in order to finish his training as a Dragon Rider. Meanwhile, his cousin Roran must unite the small town of Carvahall as it is battered by Galbatorix's forces, including the nasty Ra'zac. The story alternates between Eragon and Saphira and their political maneuvering and Roran and his more traditional adventure over land and sea. Paolini provides a worthy companion to Eragon (Knopf, 2003), though it does not stand alone (a summary of the first book will be included in the final edition). The plot-indeed, most of the fantasy conventions-is heavily inspired by Tolkien, McCaffrey, and especially George Lucas. The momentum of the narrative is steady and consistent: a problem presents itself and is neatly (and conveniently) solved before the next one arises, making it appealing to some adventure-quest fantasy fans and runescape.com players. Eragon's journey to maturity is well handled. He wrestles earnestly with definitions for good and evil, and he thoughtfully examines the question of good at what price.While there's nothing particularly original here, the book will find its fan-base.-Sarah Couri, New York Public Library Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Eragon continues his Rider training in this dense sequel. After the epic battle at Farthen Dur, Eragon travels to the elven city Ellesmera to complete his magical education. There he learns from Oromis and Glaedr, a wounded Rider and his dragon who have been hidden for years, ever since Galbatorix overthrew the old order and slew the Riders. Meanwhile, inhuman servants of Galbatorix have invaded Eragon's home village Carvahall, hoping to capture Eragon's cousin Roran. Roran leads the villagers to join the Varden rebellion against Galbatorix's tyranny. Another epic battle concludes the story and brings the cousins together just in time for a revelation of dark secrets. Suffused with purple prose and faux-archaic language, this patchwork of dialogue, characters and concepts pulled whole cloth from the fantasy canon holds together remarkably well. Dramatic tension is maintained through the interweaving of Eragon's and Roran's adventures, though too much time is spent on the details of Eragon's training. Derivative but exciting. (Fantasy. 12-15)First printing of 1,000,000
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307282880
  • Publisher: Listening Library, Inc.
  • Publication date: 8/28/2005
  • Series: Inheritance Cycle Series , #2
  • Format: CD
  • Edition description: Unabridged
  • Age range: 12 - 17 Years

Meet the Author

Christopher Paolini

Christopher Paolini’s abiding love of fantasy and science fiction inspired him to begin writing his debut novel, Eragon, when he graduated from high school at fifteen after being homeschooled all his life. Both Eragon and Eldest, the second book in the Inheritance cycle, became instant New York Times bestsellers. Christopher is currently at work on Brisingr, the third volume in the cycle. He lives in Montana, where the dramatic landscape feeds his visions of Alagaësia.

You can find out more about Christopher and Inheritance at www.alagaesia.com.

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Read an Excerpt

Eldest


By Christopher Paolini

Knopf Books for Young Readers

ISBN: 0-375-82670-X


Chapter One

The Council of Elders

Saphira's breathing quickened, and she opened her eyes, yawning expansively. Good morning, little one.

Is it? He looked down and leaned on his hands, compressing the mattress. It's terrible ... Murtagh and Ajihad ... Why didn't sentries in the tunnels warn us of the Urgals? They shouldn't have been able to trail Ajihad's group without being noticed. ... Arya was right, it doesn't make sense.

We may never know the truth, said Saphira gently. She stood, wings brushing the ceiling. You need to eat, then we must discover what the Varden are planning. We can't waste time; a new leader could be chosen within hours.

Eragon agreed, thinking of how they had left everyone yesterday: Orik rushing off to give King Hrothgar the tidings, Jormundur taking Ajihad's body to a place where it would rest until the funeral, and Arya, who stood alone and watched the goings-on.

Eragon rose and strapped on Zar'roc and his bow, then bent and lifted Snowfire's saddle. A line of pain sheared through his torso, driving him to the floor, where he writhed, scrabbling at his back. It felt like he was being sawed in half. Saphira growled as the ripping sensation reached her. She tried to soothe him with her own mind but was unable to alleviate his suffering. Her tail instinctually lifted, as if to fight.

It took minutes before the fit subsided and the last throb faded away, leaving Eragon gasping. Sweat drenched his face, making his hair stick and his eyes sting. He reached back and gingerly fingered the top of his scar. It was hot and inflamed and sensitive to touch. Saphira lowered her nose and touched him on the arm. Oh, little one....

It was worse this time, he said, staggering upright. She let him lean against her as he wiped away the sweat with a rag, then he tentatively stepped for the door.

Are you strong enough to go?

We have to. We're obliged as dragon and Rider to make a public choice regarding the next head of the Varden, and perhaps even influence the selection. I won't ignore the strength of our position; we now wield great authority written the Varden. At least the Twins aren't here to grab the position for themselves. That's the only good in the situation.

Very well, but Durza should suffer a thousand years of torture for what he did to you.

He grunted. Just stay close to me.

Together they made their way through Tronjheim, toward the nearest kitchen. In the corridors and hallways, people stopped and bowed to them, murmuring, "Argetlam," or "Shadeslayer." Even dwarves made the motions, though not as often. Eragon was struck by the somber, haunted expressions of the humans and the dark clothing they wore to display their sadness. Many women dressed entirely in black, lace veils covering their faces.

In the kitchen, Eragon brought a stone platter of food to a low table. Saphira watched him carefully in case he should have another attack. Several people tried to approach him, but she lifted a lip and growled sending them scurrying away. Eragon pretended to ignore the disturbances and picked at the food. Finally, trying to divert his thoughts from Murtagh, he asked, Who do you think has the means to take control of the Varden, now that Ajihad and the Twins are gone?

She hesitated. It's possible you could, if Ajihad's last words were interpreted as a blessing to secure the leadership. Almost no one would oppose you. However, that does not seem a wise path to take. I see only trouble in that direction.

I agree. Besides, Arya wouldn't approve, and she could be a dangerous enemy. Elves can't lie in the ancient language, but they have no such inhibition in ours-she could deny that Ajihad ever uttered those words if it served her purposes. No, I don't want the position. ... What about Jormundur?

Ajihad called him his right-hand man. Unfortunately, we know little about him or the Varden's other leaders. Such a short time has passed since we came here. We will have to make our judgment on our feelings and impressions, without the benefit of history.

Eragon pushed his fish around a lump of mashed tubers. Don't forget Hrothgar and the dwarf clans; they won't be quiet in this. Except for Arya, the elves have no say in the succession-a decision will be made before word of this even reaches them. But the dwarves can't be-won't be-ignored. Hrothgar favors the Varden, but if enough clans oppose him, he might be maneuvered into backing someone unsuited for the command.

And who might that be?

A person easily manipulated. He closed his eyes and leaned back. It could be anyone in Farthen Dur, anyone at all.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from Eldest by Christopher Paolini
Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Reading Group Guide

1. History and Beliefs

- Compare the different historic traditions of Alagaësia as they are explained in Eldest. Why do the dwarves, the elves, and the humans all have such different mythologies? What do their stories tell us about each of their races?

- What does Saphira tell Eragon about the dragons’ beliefs in Eldest? Compare what the dragons believe with what the dwarves and elves do.

- After reading Eldest, explain the origins of the animosity among the races of dragons, elves, dwarves, and humans. What are the effects of those ancient wars on the present day situation in Alagaësia?

- Why are the elves vegetarians? Why does Eragon become a vegetarian after living with them and studying with Oromis in Eldest?

- Compare the ways the different races live–the elves in the forest, the dwarves in their caves, the humans in cities and towns. How does the habitat of each of these peoples affect their way of life and their connection with their environment?

2. Family and Home

- Discuss who his parents might be. Why is his father’s identity a mystery, and why did his mother bring him to her brother to raise and then disappear? How does the reader’s understanding change after reading Eldest?

- What was Eragon’s life like before he found the dragon’s egg in the Spine in Eragon? How did his discovery of the egg change his life?

- Why was Eragon comfortable exploring the Spine when everyone else in his village was afraid of the place? What does the Spine represent to the other inhabitants of Carvahall? How does Roran convince them to overcome those fears in Eldest?

- Is it hard for Roran to convince the villagers to leave their homes in Eldest? What does he hope to find for them when they do leave? Why do some insist on staying behind?

- Does Nasuada take control of the Varden because she is Ajihad’s daughter or because she has special qualities of leadership? Compare Nasuada’s relationship with her father in Eragon with Arya’s relationship with Islanzadí in Eldest.

- Why does Hrothgar make Eragon a member of his clan before he leaves Farthen Dûr in Eldest? What does this mean to Eragon?

- What feelings do Eragon and Roran experience when they meet again at the end of Eldest? Why is Roran so angry with Eragon? Can he forgive Eragon for Garrow’s death?

- When Murtagh tells Eragon who he really is at the end of Eldest, what effect does it have on him? Do you think what Murtagh tells him is true? What does it mean for Eragon’s future?

- In the last chapter of Eldest, Eragon thinks: “Fathers, mothers, brothers, cousins . . . It all comes down to family.” What does he mean? Who is Eragon’s true family? Where has he found his greatest sense of belonging?

3. Destiny and Responsibility

- The first line of Eragon reads: “Wind howled through the night, carrying a scent that would change the world.” What does this opening tell you about the meaning of destiny in the tale? What does the author mean by a “scent that would change the world”?

- Discuss the importance of names in Christopher Paolini’s novels. How does it affect Eragon to learn that his name was also the name of the first dragon rider? How does he choose Saphira’s name in the first book? In Eldest, how is Eragon affected by others calling him “Shadeslayer”? How has Galbatorix gained control over Murtagh and why is that control so complete?

- What does Saphira mean in Eragon when she says, “It is our destiny to attempt the impossible, to accomplish great deeds regardless of fear. It is our responsibility to the future.” Is this true for everyone? What is the responsibility of each of us to the future?

- In Eragon, Angela the fortuneteller says, “To know one’s fate can be a terrible thing.” Would you want to know your future if someone could tell you? Why does Eragon decide to hear her predictions? What does she mean when she says, “That freedom [to choose your fate] is a gift, but it is also a responsibility more binding than chains”? Which of her predictions (in the chapter titled “The Witch and the Werecat”) actually come true as the story continues in Eldest?

- How does it affect Roran when people start to call him “Stronghammer” in Eldest? Why does Roran take most of the village of Carvahall with him in his quest to rescue Katrina?

- How does Eragon change in the course of his studies with Oromis in Eldest? Which of his new powers are the result of hard training and which are the result of learning more about the use of magic? Is he, indeed, fulfilling a destiny or responding to his sense of duty and responsibility–or both?

4. Trust and Fear

- In Eragon, how does Eragon know that he can trust Brom enough to travel with him? Why does he leave his home and all that is familiar to him?

- Who are the Ra’zac and what do they represent to Eragon when he first encounters them in Eragon? Why do the Ra’zac return to Carvahall in Eldest? Why do they take Katrina away with them? Is it trust or fear that makes the people of Carvahall follow Roran into the wilderness?

- In the first book, when Eragon realizes that Arya is an elf, does it change his feelings about her? Why does he rescue her from the prison even though it puts his own safety in jeopardy? What is it that keeps Arya from returning Eragon’s affection in Eldest?

- When Eragon finds the stronghold of the Varden in the first book he is challenged and his mind probed by the Twins. Why did Ajihad trust the Twins? Are there clues in Eragon to indicate that the Twins were actually working for Galbatorix, as we discover in Eldest?

- How does Eragon feel when he learns about Murtagh’s parentage in Eragon? Does the fact that Murtagh’s father was Morzan affect Eragon’s trust of him? Does it affect your feelings about his character? What does Eragon feel when he realizes who he is fighting at the end of Eldest? Will he ever be able to trust Murtagh again?

- What is Eragon’s greatest fear? What is Roran’s greatest fear? Do their fears affect the way they act and interact with others? Discuss their reunion in the last chapter of Eldest. Why does Roran strike Eragon? How do they regain their trust for each other?

5. Use and Abuse of Power

- In Eldest, Oromis says: “As Galbatorix has demonstrated, power without moral direction is the most dangerous force in the world.” What does he mean by this? By the end of Eldest what other characters have “power without moral direction”?

- Discuss the connection of magic to power in this story. Why does Eragon have to learn the use of magic so slowly, first from Brom (in Eragon) and then from Oromis (in Eldest)? Who are the other characters that can use magic and what are the limits on their magical powers?

- Why does the use of magic drain the energy of the person performing the magic? What are the ways that Eragon learns to control his use of magic and his energy in Eldest?

- In Eldest, is Murtagh able to use magic more effectively than Eragon? Why do you think this is so?

6. Good and Evil

- Many fantasy novels deal with the struggle between forces of good and evil. Discuss the ways in which the Inheritance books explore this theme and which characters represent good and which represent evil. Are there some characters that you are still not sure about by the end of Eldest?

- Eragon begins with the Shade and his ruthless ambush of the elf we later learn is Arya. How did this Prologue affect your anticipation of the story to come? Why is the Prologue titled “Shade of Fear”? What do we learn of the Shade’s past when he is killed at the end of Eragon?

- How did Galbatorix establish his rule of Alagaësia? According to the history Brom shares in Eragon, what experiences turned Galbatorix into a cruel and feared ruler?

- The Urgals seem to be completely ruthless, yet Eragon is hesitant to kill them with his magic in Eragon. In the chapter called “A Costly Mistake,” why does he only use his magic to stun them? Why is he so upset when Murtagh kills Torkenbrand, the slave trader? By the end of Eldest, Eragon has different feelings about the Urgals. What has changed his mind?

- In Eldest Roran commits crimes in his efforts to save the people of Carvahall who have placed their trust in him; he kills, steals, and uses trickery to get what he needs. Can he justify what he has done in the name of helping others? How does he feel about the men he has killed?

- Why is Oromis so angry about the blessing that Eragon gave to the child in Farthen Dûr? What is the place of Elva in the story by the end of Eldest? Is her blessing/curse a force for good or for evil? How can it work both ways?

7. Character Study

- Compare Eragon and his cousin Roran. How do Eragon’s and Roran’s journeys in Eldest parallel each other and how are they different? Describe the changes in each of them from the beginning of Eragon to the end of Eldest. What influences are most important on their growth? Which people and events are most important to their development?

- Compare Brom (in Eragon) and Oromis (in Eldest). How are they similar and how are they different? What does each of them contribute to Eragon’s training? Which of them, do you think, has the most influence on Eragon’s growth as a Rider?

- How would you describe Arya? Why does Arya reject Eragon’s romantic feelings in Eldest? What aspects of her personality contribute to their friendship and what keeps them from having a romantic relationship? How does Arya feel about being the daughter of the queen?

- Compare the magical qualities of Angela and Elva as we see them in Eldest. What do we know about each of them and how do their magical abilities contribute to the story? How do you feel about these characters–in terms of their trustworthiness?

- Compare the leadership styles of Nasuada and Orrin, the king of Surda, in Eldest. Why do the Varden go to Surda, and what help do they expect from Orrin?

- Describe the character of Saphira. How has she grown from the time she was a hatchling? What does she learn from Glaedr and how does she grow during her training? What are some of the difficult feelings and pain that Saphira and Eragon share? What are some of the joys that they share?

8. One Step Beyond: Predictions

- Do you think Eragon will ever be able to return to the Palancar Valley and Carvahall? He longs for his home in the midst of his adventures, but will he and Roran be able to return to the farm when their adventures are over?

- At the end of the first book, Eragon hears a voice in his head, someone helping him to escape the horrors of Durza’s memories. In Eldest, we learn that person is Oromis, who will become Eragon’s trainer. What foreshadowing comes at the end of Eldest? Predict some of the plot of Book Three of Inheritance. What do you expect to happen?

- Who are the characters that might play a major role in the next book? Will Eragon come face-to-face with Galbatorix? Will he fight Murtagh again? Will Eragon and Roran be able to rescue Katrina? Who will provide the most assistance to Eragon?

- Why do you think Galbaltorix continues to gain strength, and how is he able to make Murtagh stronger than Eragon? How do you think Eragon and Saphira can develop the strength to combat the evil powers of Galbatorix?

9. Connecting Fantasy to Real Life

- What kinds of good and evil do you hear about in the news of our world? Discuss examples from news stories that report events representing the good and evil in our society and in international news.

- What circumstances can bring people together to become friends and what can make those friendships grow and develop? What circumstances can hurt a friendship? What are some of the ways people have difficulty with family members?

- Do you feel that some people have a destiny to fulfill or a special reason for living? Name people in history who had a strong responsibility to a cause for good or evil. (Possibilities might be Abraham Lincoln, Gandhi, and Martin Luther King for good causes and Attila the Hun, Adolf Hitler, and Josef Stalin for evil.)

- Name some characters from legend, literature, or film who represent the causes of good or evil. (Possibilities might be Luke Skywalker, King Arthur, Frodo for good; Darth Vader, Mordred, Sauron for evil.)

Guide prepared by Connie Rockman, Children’s Literature Consultant, adjunct professor of literature for youth, and editor of the Junior Authors and Illustrators series (H.W. Wilson).

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 2456 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 2, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    An unforgettable tale

    I highly recommend this book! It's GREAT! I actually cried at one part... I loved Eragon, and I'm glad Eldest didn't let me down. I wish they'd continue producing the movies. The Eragon movie is what got me to read the books in the first place. Chris Paolini is an incredible writer! I still can't believe these monstrous books, with their incredible characters, languages, lands, and creatures was created by a guy younger than me! I don't usually read these sorts of books, but I'm glad I did. It's been a nice change of pace in terms of reading material, and it's been an awesome adventure.

    32 out of 33 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 2, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    On the recommendation of a young friend...

    ...I read Eragon. I was hooked so I had to read this one too. Then of course I just couldn't wait to read the next. I really am enjoying this series and am looking forward to the conclusion book. This is my idea of escapism. You find yourself pulled into the story and loving or hating the characters as they appeal to you. I would recommend this not just to young adults but to older readers as well.

    20 out of 20 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    Eldest- Must Read

    I have read many books in my time, and Eldest, along with the other books in the Eragon series are some of the best i have seen in a long time. If you like fantasty, adventure, and a hint of love stories, you will love this book!

    14 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    Great theme/story. Love it

    Great theme/story. Love it

    11 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 17, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Great book!

    I have reread this book several times! Enjoy it alot! Characters are well made and allow you to really get into the story!

    10 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 12, 2012

    Wonderful book!

    This book was an amazing follow up of Eragon! As with Eragon, it was thrilling and action packed which keeps the reader on the edge of their seat and unable to put the book down. I would (and have) suggest this series to anyone and everyone because it is perfect for anyone who can read at this level! I can't wait to see what Paolini comes out with next, heres hoping for more stories from Alagaesia!

    8 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2011

    Very good.

    Good, but itcould use some improvements where Roran is concerned. But Eragon's story is fantastic, a wonderful sequel to the first book, Eragon. I really enjoy reading this and it kept me entertained for over 9 hoirs on a car trip. Even after reading it for so long, I still read before I went to bed that night.

    8 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2012

    Best book ever

    Hello i recommend this book to you i am only 10 and i love this book. Good byye Harry Potter fans! :D

    7 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2012

    Genius

    Great book. Hope Paolini goes on to do great things.

    6 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2011

    Sweet!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!! !! !!

    Awsome book!!!!!!

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 22, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Amazing read

    I wasn't expecting to like this series so much! What a pleasant surprise! I had been reading some really good series' lately and didn't think anything could top them but Christopher Paolini has done an amazing job with this series. I feel like the characters are like old friends. I would highly recommend this book (and series) to everyone!

    6 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 15, 2006

    It was enjoyable but unoriginal in some factors...

    This book bears many similarites to The Lord of the Rings, Dune and other such works, which dampen a reader's enjoyment of the work. And it is just not one or two-Aragorn vs. Eragon, Arya vs. Arwen. Elver is quite similar to the main character's younger sister in Dune, otherwise this book was okay

    6 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2012

    Love it

    Love it

    4 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 15, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Perfect Sequel to Eragon!

    This book just picked off where Eragon left off and kept going... As always I love this book and it is just as good if not better as Eragon. Great twist at the end that you dont see coming! If you liked Eragon then definitly take the time to read this sequel!

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 3, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    My Review for the book Eldest

    Eldest is a great book and I would recommend it to anyone of my friends. The whole Inheritance Cycle is very good. I have just started to read Brisingr and I like it very much. Eldest has action, fantasy, and suspense just like Eragon which is a good book also. Kids will love this book and so will parents.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 30, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    My how the author has grown

    I read Eragon because everyone else had already read Eragon. It was a fun read, although I agree that you can see every fantasy classic mimiced within the pages. However, with Eldest, Paolini matures as a writer. Funny how his protagonist transforms into a Rider while the man behind the curtain gains his writing chops. Can't wait to read the final installment. (And if you like Paolini, you gotta try Lloyd Alexander. I've included the Prydain series with this review. They rock.)

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 25, 2012

    Amazing!!!

    I loved this book so much i think i cried when it was over! I could not believe the ending!!! You have to read this! No matter how old u are! Read it!!!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 14, 2012

    Eldest-love the second book!

    My son talked me into starting the series and I thought it would be too geared to young people for me to enjoy, but then I thought that about Harry Potter books too.

    Love the atmosphere, the scenery, and the depth of characters. Makes me feel like I'm there.

    I'm currently reading Brisingr and haven't regretted any money spent on these ebooks.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2012

    Third book is "Brisingr"

    The forth one is out too

    3 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2012

    Hi

    This is an amazing book! It is the second book, so if you haven't read the book Eragon, read that first. Eldest is about Eragons training in a city calledElsmera. The middle is a bit boring, but once you get past that part the end is SUPER exiting! You learn secrets and if you love fantacy and love action, this is the book for you! READ THIS BOOK!

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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