Eleanor Roosevelt: An Inspiring Life

Overview

Eleanor Roosevelt was born into a wealthy family but had a difficult early life. Both her parents died before she was ten. She was a painfully shy child and felt unattractive and awkward as a young woman. But Eleanor overcame tragedy and personal insecurity to become America's most popular First Lady -- her husband was President Franklin Delano Roosevelt -- and one of the world's most powerful women. Eleanor worked hard to help others, especially women, minorities and poor people.? Eleanor flew greater distances ...
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Overview

Eleanor Roosevelt was born into a wealthy family but had a difficult early life. Both her parents died before she was ten. She was a painfully shy child and felt unattractive and awkward as a young woman. But Eleanor overcame tragedy and personal insecurity to become America's most popular First Lady -- her husband was President Franklin Delano Roosevelt -- and one of the world's most powerful women. Eleanor worked hard to help others, especially women, minorities and poor people.? Eleanor flew greater distances than any other woman in the world during the early days of international flight. She was the first president's wife to hold press conferences and write newspaper columns. After she was First Lady, her achievements continued. Eleanor kept busy as a diplomat and author and also helped write The Universal Declaration of Human Rights for the United Nations. This book in the Snapshots: Images of People and Places in History series introduces young readers to the First Lady, activist, UN delegate, world traveler and writer who led such an inspiring life.
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Editorial Reviews

CM Magazine
Designed with a keen sense of how images and text work on a page to hold a young reader’s attention, MacLeod’s Eleanor Roosevelt succeeds in making history both personal and interesting. Personal because the young reader is made aware that, while Ms. Roosevelt’s public life was challenging and rewarding, her private life was filled with hurt and disappointment ? .There are many strengths of this book. One is that the reader learns, in easy to read language, that life is complex. Ms. Roosevelt can teach any reader that both negative and positive events happen in one’s life, and one chooses how to respond to them. Her response was to contribute to society ? The readers will learn about that time period without having the sense of being ’taught’ history ? I highly recommend this book ?
Children's Literature - Debbie Levy
It is easy to be inspired by the indomitable Mrs. R (as readers learn Eleanor Roosevelt's friends called her). This book, brimming with photographs and short blocks of text, is perfect for middle readers turned off by text-heavy traditional biographies. In 32 pages, it manages to tell the basic narrative of Roosevelt's life, to convey her contributions to American history and to the progress of women in the nation's life, and to impart fascinating nuggets of information. Readers learn of Roosevelt's privileged yet precarious childhood (both her parents died before she was a teenager), of her social insecurity, and of her tremendous energy, much of which was channeled into efforts to make her country, and the world, a better place. Roosevelt's relationship with her husband, thirty-second president Franklin Delano Roosevelt, is presented sensitively, without whitewashing the couple's marital difficulties. The author makes good use of quotations from Roosevelt's writings and talks. "Learn from the mistakes of others," she said; "You can't live long enough to make them all yourself." Photographs are dynamic and revealing, as befits this addition to the publisher's "Snapshots" series of biographies.
School Library Journal
Gr 4-6-Fourteen short chapters take readers from Roosevelt's privileged but sad childhood through her marriage, political and family life, and post-FDR humanitarian work. That she was one of the most important women in U.S. history is made quite clear. Her husband's infidelity is mentioned. The writing is clear, interesting, and affectionate toward its subject. Personal quotes are sprinkled throughout, and a cartoon representation of Roosevelt chats with readers on several pages. Back matter includes an extensive index and list of historic places. The period photographs, while plentiful and engrossing, can be found elsewhere. Given the number of books available for this age group, this attractive title will appeal to browsers and report writers, but it isn't a necessary purchase.-Anne Chapman Callaghan, Racine Public Library, WI Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Eleanor Roosevelt never wanted to be First Lady; she would be just "plain, ordinary Mrs. Roosevelt. And that's all." In clear, matter-of-fact writing, MacLeod's entry in the Snapshots series weaves the parallel stories of two major figures of American history. While Franklin Delano Roosevelt followed his political ambitions to the White House, Eleanor got involved with social causes. During the Great Depression, she urged the creation of the National Youth Administration. She championed Marian Anderson's performance at the Lincoln Memorial in 1939 and worked with Mary McLeod Bethune to fight for civil rights. After WWII, Truman asked her to be a delegate to the United Nations, where she worked for the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Each page of text in this accessible volume is a new topic and faces a page of further information, including quotations, photographs and reproductions of posters and newspaper headlines. The author also includes a frank discussion of FDR's affair with Lucy Mercer. A useful resource for library and classroom, this will appeal to readers and browsers alike. (chronology, places to visit, index) (Nonfiction. 8-12)
From the Publisher
A useful resource for library and classroom, this will appeal to readers and browsers alike.

The writing is clear, interesting, and affectionate towards its subject. Personal quotes are sprinkled throughout, and a cartoon representation of Roosevelt chats with readers on several pages. Back matter includes an extensive index and list of historic places. The period photographs ? [are plentiful and engrossing ? [This attractive title will appeal to browsers and report writers ?

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Product Details

Meet the Author

Elizabeth MacLeod has written many children's books, including nine titles in the Snapshots Biography series; numerous titles in the Kids Can Read, Kids Books Of and Kids Can Do It series; Why Do Horses Have Manes?; What Did Dinosaurs Eat?; and Monster Fliers. She lives in Toronto.
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