Eleanor Roosevelt: First Lady: Creators of the American Mind Series, Volume II / Edition 1

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Overview

The second volume in the CREATORS OF THE AMERICAN MIND series, this collection of primary sources demonstrates the power which individuals of talent, will, and opportunity can exert over the American public. Brief enough to serve as a supplementary reader for courses in American History and Women's History, ELEANOR ROOSEVELT: FIRST LADY offers students a collection of documents (with informative introductions) that are grouped logically, making it easy for them to research and write on Eleanor Roosevelt.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780155057043
  • Publisher: Cengage Learning
  • Publication date: 11/23/1998
  • Series: Creators of the American Mind Series
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 240
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Dr. James T. Baker is a graduate of Baylor and Florida State Universities. He holds the title of University Distinguished Professor of History at Western Kentucky University. He has been a Fulbright Senior Lecturer in American Studies in both Korea and Taiwan, and for twenty years he directed and taught in study-abroad programs for American students in Britain and Ireland. He is now director of the United States Interns to the Canadian Parliament Program in Ottawa. He has published books on figures such as Thomas Merton, Jimmy Carter, Eric Hoffer, Ayn Rand, Brooks Hays, and Studs Terkel. Professor Baker serves as series editor for the Creators of the American Mind series and has contributed earlier volumes on Nat Turner, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln.

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Table of Contents

Part I: Preface. Part II: Introduction. A. A Tribute from Adlai Stevenson. B. A Critique from William Buckley. Part III: The Formation of a Public Woman. A. Youth, Education, Marriage, and Motherhood (1884-1918), as told by Doris Kearns Goodwin, Helen Gahagan Douglas, and Eleanor Roosevelt herself. B. The Story of Lucy Mercer, As Told by Joseph Lash. C. Years of Political Preparation (1921-1932). 1. Eleanor Roosevelt's Own Account. 2. Lorena Hickock's Account. 3. An Assessment of the Early Years, By Tamara Hareven. D. Questions for Responsive Essays. Part IV: First Lady of the United States (1933-1945). A. Eleanor Roosevelt and Other First Ladies. B. An Account of How Eleanor Roosevelt Changed the Role of First Lady, by Abigail McCarthy. C. Eleanor Roosevelt's Account of Her First Year in the White House. D. Comments on Her Role by Lorena Hickock, Frances Perkins, and Helen Gahagan Douglas. E. An Assessment of Eleanor Roosevelt as Social Reformer First Lady, by Tamara Hareven. F. A Tribute from Hillary Rodham Clinton. G. Questions for Responsive Essays. Part V: "First Lady of the World". A. Eleanor Roosevelt and World War II (1941-1945). B. Her Own Account of Her Years at the United Nations (1946-1952). C. A Contemporary Woman's Impression of Eleanor Roosevelt at the U.N. D. The Exchange with Russian Ambassador Vishinsky. E. A "New Deal" for the World: Eleanor Roosevelt and the issue of Human Rights. 1. The Drafting of the United Nations Document on Human Rights. 2. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, passed by the United Nations General Assembly, December 10, 1948. F. An Assessment of Eleanor Roosevelt's Work at the United Nations, by Colleen O'' Connor. G. Questions for Responsive Essays. Part VI: A First-Rate Conscience. A. The "Moral Basis" of Eleanor Roosevelt's Democracy. B. Her Opinions on Public Matters. 1. An Essay on Racism. 2. Public Questions and Her Answers. C. Her Opinions on Personal Matters. 1. An Essay on How to Take Criticism. 2. Personal Questions and Her Answers. D. Her Opinions on Private Matters. 1. An Essay on Why She Chose Not to Run for Office. 2. Private Questions and Her Answers. E. Questions for Responsive Essays. Part VII: A Woman First. A. Selections from Eleanor Roosevelt's Book. B. An Essay on Women in the Post-World War II Peace Settlement, Written in 1944. C. An Essay, "Women Have Come a Long Way," Written in 1950, Five Years After Leaving the White House. D. The Final Crusade: Eleanor Roosevelt as Chariot of the Kennedy Commission on the Status of Women. E. Two Assessments of Eleanor Roosevelt's Work for Women's Rights: Joseph Lash and Susan Hartmann. F. A Tribute from Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton. G. Questions for Responsive Essays. Part VIII: Topics for Papers of Extended Essays on Eleanor Roosevelt.

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