Electing to Fight: Why Emerging Democracies Go to War / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $4.86
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 74%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (13) from $4.86   
  • New (7) from $8.62   
  • Used (6) from $4.86   

Overview

Does the spread of democracy really contribute to international peace? Successive U.
S. administrations have justified various policies intended to promote democracy not only by arguing that democracy is intrinsically good but by pointing to a wide range of research concluding that democracies rarely, if ever, go to war with one another. To promote democracy, the United States has provided economic assistance, political support, and technical advice to emerging democracies in
Eastern and Central Europe, and it has attempted to remove undemocratic regimes through political pressure, economic sanctions, and military force. In Electing to Fight, Edward Mansfield and Jack
Snyder challenge the widely accepted basis of these policies by arguing that states in the early phases of transitions to democracy are more likely than other states to become involved in war.Drawing on both qualitative and quantitative analysis, Mansfield and Snyder show that emerging democracies with weak political institutions are especially likely to go to war. Leaders of these countries attempt to rally support by invoking external threats and resorting to belligerent,
nationalist rhetoric. Mansfield and Snyder point to this pattern in cases ranging from revolutionary
France to contemporary Russia. Because the risk of a state's being involved in violent conflict is high until democracy is fully consolidated, Mansfield and Snyder argue, the best way to promote democracy is to begin by building the institutions that democracy requires -- such as the rule of law -- and only then encouraging mass political participation and elections. Readers will find this argument particularly relevant to prevailing concerns about the transitional government in Iraq.
Electing to Fight also calls into question the wisdom of urging early elections elsewhere in the
Islamic world and in China.

The MIT Press

Read More Show Less

What People Are Saying

From the Publisher

"American foreign policy has been based on the premise that democracy promotes peace.
Electing to Fight conclusively shows, however, that democratization, when mishandled, leads to war. Its challenge to the conventional beliefs of scholars and politicians makes it one of the most important books on international affairs in recent decades."
Samuel P. Huntington , Albert J. Weatherhead III University Professor, Harvard
University

The MIT Press

' Electing to Fight is an important book. With analytical power and historical depth, Mansfield and Snyder argue for a simple conclusion: democratization can be dangerous, even if democracy, once achieved, is a good thing. Scholars, journalists, politicians,
and citizens all need to hear this message, and to heed it. If Mansfield and Snyder are right, then policies that rely on war to promote elections are bound to produce disaster.' Joshua Cohen
, Leon and Anne Goldberg Professor of the Humanities and Head of the Department of
Political Science, MIT

The MIT Press

"American foreign policy has been based on the premise that democracy promotes peace.
*Electing to Fight* conclusively shows, however, that democratization, when mishandled, leads to war. Its challenge to the conventional beliefs of scholars and politicians makes it one of the most important books on international affairs in recent decades."--Samuel P. Huntington, Albert J.
Weatherhead III University Professor, Harvard University

The MIT Press

Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author

Edward D. Mansfield is Hum Rosen Professor of Political Science at the University of
Pennsylvania. He is the author of Power, Trade, and War and
International Conflict and the Global Economy.

Jack Snyder is the Robert and Renée Belfer Professor of International Relations at Columbia
University. He is the author of From Voting to Violence: Democratization and Nationalist
Conflict
; Myths of Empire: Domestic Politics and International
Ambition
; and The Ideology of the Offensive: Military Decision Making and the
Disasters of 1914
.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Ch. 1 The perilous path to the democratic peace 1
Ch. 2 Reconciling the democratic peace with accounts of democratization and war 21
Ch. 3 Explaining turbulent transitions 39
Ch. 4 Data and measures for testing the argument 69
Ch. 5 Democratization and war : statistical findings 95
Ch. 6 Democratizing dyads and the outbreak of war : statistical findings 139
Ch. 7 Democratizing initiators of war : tracing causal processes 169
Ch. 8 Tracing trajectories of democratization and war in the 1990s 229
Ch. 9 Conclusion : sequencing the transition for peace 265
App Democratizing countries that experienced the outbreak of external war, 1816-1992
About the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)