Electric

Electric

4.0 2
by Jack Ingram
     
 
You know Jack Ingram has to be an "alt-country" performer. For one thing, his songs rock, and for another thing, he's witty enough to have a song lyric like "Everybody loves you/Jesus told you so/Everybody's lying/Hell, even Jesus knows." Ingram's songs mix a subtle background of country and folk with a hefty dose of roots rock, and the result is reminiscent of early

Overview

You know Jack Ingram has to be an "alt-country" performer. For one thing, his songs rock, and for another thing, he's witty enough to have a song lyric like "Everybody loves you/Jesus told you so/Everybody's lying/Hell, even Jesus knows." Ingram's songs mix a subtle background of country and folk with a hefty dose of roots rock, and the result is reminiscent of early Rolling Stones or Bob Dylan without the fancy wordcraft. In fact, Ingram's lyrics are simple but often humorous, as on "We're All in This Together," and the above-quoted "Everybody." While many of the songs on this album are fast-moving and danceable, the last three songs are performed acoustically. While they may not live up to the title Electric, they demonstrate Ingram's ability to do "old-style" country -- but with a modern twist. Despite the occasional touch of slide guitar, this is country for city folk, music that fits in well with the Adult Album Alternative radio format.

Product Details

Release Date:
06/04/2002
Label:
Sony
UPC:
0696998593022
catalogNumber:
85930

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Jack Ingram   Primary Artist,Acoustic Guitar,Percussion,Electric Guitar,Vocals,Background Vocals
Giles Reaves   Percussion
Eric Darken   Percussion
Bukka Allen   Keyboards
Richard Bennett   Acoustic Guitar
Bob Britt   Acoustic Guitar,Electric Guitar,Background Vocals
Chad Cromwell   Drums
Chris Feinstein   Bass
Paul Franklin   Steel Guitar
Jon Dee Graham   Acoustic Guitar,Electric Guitar
John Paul Graham   Guitar
Kenny Greenberg   Electric Guitar
Patty Griffin   Background Vocals
David Grissom   Electric Guitar
Rob Hajacos   Fiddle
Tommy Hannum   Steel Guitar,Slide Guitar
John Hobbs   Keyboards
Jay Joyce   Acoustic Guitar,Bass,Percussion,Electric Guitar,Keyboards
Anthony Martin   Background Vocals
Bruce Robison   Background Vocals
Glenn Worf   Bass
Peter Hyrka   Fiddle
Tom Littlefield   Acoustic Guitar,Background Vocals
Lee Ann Womack   Background Vocals
Pete Coatney   Percussion,Drums

Technical Credits

Jay Joyce   Arranger,Programming,Engineer
Beth Kindig   Art Direction
King Williams   Engineer
Mike McCarthy   Producer,Engineer
Tony Castle   Engineer
Jim Lightman   Engineer
Frank Liddell   Producer
Patrick Himes   Engineer
David Bryant   Engineer

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Electric 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Jack's latest album is a smash! He really nailed this one. This is what Americana music is all about!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ingram's fifth studio release, his second for Lucky Dog, continues the hybridization that the Sony imprint has worked with Charlie Robison, The Derailers and BR549. The pairing of Texas roadhouse-tested Ingram with producers Frank Liddell (Lee Ann Womack, Chris Knight's Nashville-stacked debut) and Mike McCarthy has edged the singer-songwriter away from the grittier work of his previous albums. The drums and bass are louder, the lyrics more pedestrian, and the vibe more mainstream rock 'n' roll punch than honky-tonk twang.

Production touches like the over-driven electric coda tacked onto the acoustic blue-gospel ''Pete, Jesus and Me,'' and the oddly shifting vocal treatment of ''Goodnight Moon'' are more distracting than mesmerizing. The rootsy edge of Ingram's voice still anchors the CD, but his lyrics leave behind the quirky characters that provided earlier story hook, and the studio full of session players cast their inevitable normalizing shadow. The lack of ''band'' is especially disappointing for an artist who's made so much of his road show.

Guest artists provide a few nice contributions, including Patty Griffin's harmony vocal on ''What Makes You Say,'' Bukka Allen's keyboards, and Jim Lauderdale's lyrical support on ''One Lie Away.'' But even combined with Ingram's natural talent and charisma, they can't overcome the album's overworked sound. Lucky Dog's previous attempts to broaden Texas acts from their cult status have produced interesting results, if not always commercial dividends. With Ingram, their effort feels colorless, stripped of some of the most interesting characteristics (and characters) of his music.