Electric Youth

Electric Youth

by Debbie Gibson
     
 

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Following up her enormously popular debut, Out of the Blue, Debbie Gibson sought to grow from the teen fan base she had established, while not alienating those who made her a household name. The result is slickly produced teen pop, like her debut, but it's not as squeaky clean or as compulsively likable. That is not to say it's

Overview

Following up her enormously popular debut, Out of the Blue, Debbie Gibson sought to grow from the teen fan base she had established, while not alienating those who made her a household name. The result is slickly produced teen pop, like her debut, but it's not as squeaky clean or as compulsively likable. That is not to say it's a bad album. "Lost in Your Eyes" is a pretty ballad that showcases her songwriting skills, her clear voice, and her talent on the piano. "Electric Youth" is a bouncy, frenetic song that is ridiculously sing-alongable, but at the same it is time hard to really identify with it unless you're 12 (or at least young at heart). "We Could Be Together," in which she basically tells her friends and family to go fly a kite, is practically anthemic in its joy at taking a risk on love: "I'll take this chance/I'll make this choice/I'll give up my security/for just the possibility/that we could be together/for a while." It's teen pop at its best: it makes you feel young, it makes you want to sing, it makes you want to fall in love. "Silence Speaks (A Thousand Words)" is a beautiful ballad about lack of communication that is vastly different from any of her other work, with a flute solo and lyrics that many adult songwriters can't nail. The same can be said for "No More Rhyme," a minor hit about a relationship's first hurdle. Gibson really exercised her writing chops on those songs, but much of the rest the album is only passable filler; "Who Loves Ya Baby?," "Helplessly in Love," and "Over the Wall" do little more than give her voice a reason to shine, while "Shades of the Past" is excruciatingly grating.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/25/1990
Label:
Atlantic Mod Afw
UPC:
0075678193224
catalogNumber:
81932
Rank:
4318

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Debbie Gibson   Primary Artist,Piano,Keyboards,Vocals,Background Vocals
Bashiri Johnson   Percussion
Hollis "Bud" Burridge   Trumpet
Matt Finders   Trombone
Tim Lawless   Background Vocals
Leslie Ming   Percussion
Roger Rosenberg   Flute
Ira Siegel   Acoustic Guitar,Electric Guitar
V. Jeffrey Smith   Saxophone
Sandra St. Victor   Background Vocals
Tommy Williams   Acoustic Guitar,Electric Guitar
Fred Zarr   Piano
Libby Johnson   Background Vocals
Carrie Johnson   Background Vocals
Louis Appel   Drums
Kirk Powers Burkhardt   Bass
Keeth Stewart   Background Vocals

Technical Credits

Debbie Gibson   Arranger,Producer,drum programming
Phil Castellano   Engineer
Bill Esses   Programming,Engineer
Don Feinberg   Engineer
Fred Zarr   Arranger,Producer,drum programming

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