Electrical Engineering: Principles and Applications / Edition 3 by Allan R. Hambley | 9780131470460 | Other Format | Barnes & Noble
Electrical Engineering: Principles and Applications / Edition 3

Electrical Engineering: Principles and Applications / Edition 3

1.0 1
by Allan R. Hambley
     
 

ISBN-10: 0131470469

ISBN-13: 9780131470460

Pub. Date: 04/08/2004

Publisher: Pearson Education

The author's guiding philosophy in writing this book has three elements: to present basic concepts to readers in a general setting, to show how the principles of electrical engineering apply to specific problems in their own fields, and to remove frustration from the learning process. Emphasizing the basic concepts of the field, this book covers

Overview

The author's guiding philosophy in writing this book has three elements: to present basic concepts to readers in a general setting, to show how the principles of electrical engineering apply to specific problems in their own fields, and to remove frustration from the learning process. Emphasizing the basic concepts of the field, this book covers circuit analysis, digital systems, electronics, and electromechanics. This book develops theoretical and experimental skills and experiences in the following areas: basic circuit analysis and measurement, first- and second-order transients, steady-state ac circuits, resonance and frequency response, digital logic circuits, microcontrollers (68HC11), computer-based instrumentation, diode circuits, electronic amplifiers, field-effect and bipolar junction transistors, operational amplifiers, ac and dc machines, and more. For engineers or any other professionals who need a solid foundation in the basics of circuits, digital systems, analog electronics, and electromechanics.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780131470460
Publisher:
Pearson Education
Publication date:
04/08/2004
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
896
Product dimensions:
8.10(w) x 9.40(h) x 1.50(d)

Table of Contents

Practical Applications of Electrical Engineering Principlesvi
Contentsvii
Prefacexi
Part 1Circuits1
1Introduction2
1.1Overview of Electrical Engineering3
1.2Circuits, Currents, and Voltages7
1.3Power and Energy15
1.4Kirchhoff's Current Law18
1.5Kirchhoff's Voltage Law21
1.6Introduction to Circuit Elements24
1.7Introduction to Circuits33
Summary36
Problems37
2Resistive Circuits43
2.1Resistances in Series and Parallel44
2.2Network Analysis by Using Series and Parallel Equivalents48
2.3Voltage-Divider and Current-Divider Circuits52
2.4Node-Voltage Analysis57
2.5Mesh-Current Analysis72
2.6Thevenin and Norton Equivalent Circuits80
2.7Superposition Principle93
2.8Wheatstone Bridge96
Summary99
Problems100
3Inductance and Capacitance109
3.1Capacitance110
3.2Capacitances in Series and Parallel119
3.3Physical Characteristics of Capacitors120
3.4Inductance124
3.5Inductances in Series and Parallel130
3.6Practical Inductors131
3.7Mutual Inductance133
Summary135
Problems136
4Transients142
4.1First-Order RC Circuits143
4.2DC Steady State147
4.3RL Circuits149
4.4RC and RL Circuits with General Sources154
4.5Second-Order Circuits161
Summary175
Problems176
5Steady-State Sinusoidal Analysis181
5.1Sinusoidal Currents and Voltages182
5.2Phasors187
5.3Complex Impedances193
5.4Circuit Analysis with Phasors and Complex Impedances198
5.5Power in AC Circuits204
5.6Thevenin and Norton Equivalent Circuits217
5.7Balanced Three-Phase Circuits223
Summary235
Problems237
6Frequency Response, Bode Plots, and Resonance244
6.1Fourier Analysis, Filters, and Transfer Functions245
6.2First-Order Lowpass Filters254
6.3Decibels, the Cascade Connection, and Logarithmic Frequency Scales259
6.4Bode Plots264
6.5First-Order Highpass Filters267
6.6Series Resonance271
6.7Parallel Resonance277
6.8Ideal and Second-Order Filters280
6.9Digital Signal Processing286
Summary297
Problems298
Part 2Digital Systems307
7Logic Circuits308
7.1Basic Logic Circuit Concepts309
7.2Representation of Numerical Data in Binary Form312
7.3Combinatorial Logic Circuits320
7.4Synthesis of Logic Circuits329
7.5Minimization of Logic Circuits336
7.6Sequential Logic Circuits339
Conclusions351
Summary351
Problems352
8Microcomputers356
8.1Computer Organization357
8.2Memory Types360
8.3Digital Process Control363
8.4The Motorola 68HC11/12366
8.5The Instruction Set and Addressing Modes for the 68HC11372
8.6Assembly-Language Programming381
Summary386
Problems387
9Computer-Based Instrumentation Systems390
9.1Measurement Concepts and Sensors391
9.2Signal Conditioning396
9.3Analog-to-Digital Conversion402
9.4LabVIEW405
Summary417
Problems418
Part 3Electronics421
10Diodes422
10.1Basic Diode Concepts423
10.2Load-Line Analysis of Diode Circuits427
10.3Zener-Diode Voltage-Regulator Circuits429
10.4Ideal-Diode Model434
10.5Piecewise-Linear Diode Models436
10.6Rectifier Circuits440
10.7Wave-Shaping Circuits444
10.8Linear Small-Signal Equivalent Circuits450
Summary456
Problems457
11Amplifiers: Specifications and External Characteristics465
11.1Basic Amplifier Concepts466
11.2Cascaded Amplifiers472
11.3Power Supplies and Efficiency475
11.4Additional Amplifier Models478
11.5Importance of Amplifier Impedances in Various Applications482
11.6Ideal Amplifiers484
11.7Frequency Response486
11.8Linear Waveform Distortion491
11.9Pulse Response495
11.10Transfer Characteristics and Nonlinear Distortion499
11.11Differential Amplifiers502
11.12Offset Voltage, Bias Current, and Offset Current506
Summary512
Problems512
12Field-Effect Transistors521
12.1NMOS and PMOS Transistors522
12.2Load-Line Analysis of a Simple NMOS Amplifier530
12.3Bias Circuits533
12.4Small-Signal Equivalent Circuits536
12.5Common-Source Amplifiers541
12.6Source Followers545
12.7CMOS Logic Gates550
Summary554
Problems554
13Bipolar Junction Transistors559
13.1Current and Voltage Relationships560
13.2Common-Emitter Characteristics563
13.3Load-Line Analysis of a Common-Emitter Amplifier565
13.4pnp Bipolar Junction Transistors572
13.5Large-Signal DC Circuit Models574
13.6Large-Signal DC Analysis of BJT Circuits577
13.7Small-Signal Equivalent Circuits584
13.8Common-Emitter Amplifiers588
13.9Emitter Followers593
Summary599
Problems599
14Operational Amplifiers607
14.1Ideal Operational Amplifiers608
14.2Summing-Point Constraint610
14.3Inverting Amplifiers610
14.4Noninverting Amplifiers617
14.5Design of Simple Amplifiers620
14.6Op-Amp Imperfections in the Linear Range of Operation626
14.7Nonlinear Limitations630
14.8DC Imperfections635
14.9Differential and Instrumentation Amplifiers640
14.10Integrators and Differentiators642
14.11Active Filters645
Summary650
Problems651
Part 4Electromechanics661
15Magnetic Circuits and Transformers662
15.1Magnetic Fields663
15.2Magnetic Circuits673
15.3Inductance and Mutual Inductance679
15.4Magnetic Materials683
15.5Ideal Transformers686
15.6Real Transformers695
Summary699
Problems700
16DC Machines708
16.1Overview of Motors709
16.2Principles of DC Machines718
16.3Rotating DC Machines724
16.4Shunt-Connected and Separately Excited DC Motors731
16.5Series-Connected DC Motors736
16.6Speed Control of DC Motors740
Summary746
Problems747
17AC Machines753
17.1Three-Phase Induction Motors754
17.2Equivalent-Circuit and Performance Calculations for Induction Motors762
17.3Synchronous Machines772
17.4Single-Phase Motors785
17.5Stepper Motors789
Summary790
Problems791
AComplex Numbers797
Summary805
Problems805
BNominal Values and the Color Code for Resistors806
CPreparing for the Fundamentals of Engineering Exam808
DComputer-Aided Circuit Analysis814
D.1Analysis of DC Circuits814
D.2Transient Analysis823
D.3Frequency Response827
D.4Other Examples830
ESoftware Installation833
Index835

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Electrical Engineering: Principles and Applications 1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I work in a group of about 5 in my study group for my electrical class at the university useing this book. All five of us are haveing a difficult time understanding it. And not having the solutions to the homework problems at the end of the chapter make it extreamly hard to see if you are doing it right. Examples are a bit hazy in the text.