Electrical Papers

Electrical Papers

by Oliver Heaviside
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

ISBN-10: 110802856X

ISBN-13: 9781108028561

Pub. Date: 06/16/2011

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

A self-taught authority on electromagnetic theory, telegraphy and telephony, Oliver Heaviside (1850–1925) dedicated his adult life to the improvement of electrical technologies. Inspired by James Clerk Maxwell's field theory, he spent the 1880s presenting his ideas as a regular contributor to the weekly journal, The Electrician. The publication of Electrical

Overview

A self-taught authority on electromagnetic theory, telegraphy and telephony, Oliver Heaviside (1850–1925) dedicated his adult life to the improvement of electrical technologies. Inspired by James Clerk Maxwell's field theory, he spent the 1880s presenting his ideas as a regular contributor to the weekly journal, The Electrician. The publication of Electrical Papers, a year after his election to the Royal Society in 1891, established his fame beyond the scientific community. An eccentric figure with an impish sense of humour, Heaviside's accessible style enabled him to educate an entire generation in the importance and application of electricity. In so doing he helped to establish that very British phenomenon, the garden-shed inventor. Illustrated with practical examples, the subjects covered in Volume 1 include voltaic constants, duplex telegraphy, microphones and electromagnets.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781108028561
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
06/16/2011
Series:
Cambridge Library Collection - Technology Series
Pages:
586
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.20(d)

Table of Contents

Preface; 1. Comparing electromotive forces; 2. Voltaic constants; 3. On the best arrangement of Wheatstone's bridge for measuring a given resistance with a given galvanometer and battery; 4. Sensitiveness of Wheatstone's bridge; 5. On an advantageous method of using the differential galvanometer for measuring small resistances; 6. On the differential galvanometer; 7. On duplex telegraphy (part 1); 8. On duplex telegraphy (part 2); 9. Notes on Mr. Edison's electrical problem; 10. On the resistance of galvanometers; 11. On a test for telegraph lines; 12. On the electrostatic capacity of suspended wires; 13. On telegraphic signalling with condensers; 14. On the extra current; 15. On the speed of signalling through heterogeneous telegraph circuits; 16. On the theory of faults in cables; 17. On electromagnets, etc.; 18. Magneto electric current generators; 19. On induction between parallel wires; 20. Contributions to the theory of the propagation of current in wires; 21. Dimensions of a magnetic pole; 22. Theory of microphone and resistance of carbon contacts; 23. The earth as a return conductor; 24. The relations between magnetic force and electric current; 25. The energy of the electric current; 26. Some electrostatic and magnetic relations; 27. The energy of the electric current; 28. The induction of currents in cores; 29. Remarks on the Volta force, etc.; 30. Electromagnetic induction and its propagation (part 1).

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >