Electronic Properties of Engineering Materials / Edition 1

Electronic Properties of Engineering Materials / Edition 1

by James D. Livingston
     
 

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ISBN-10: 047131627X

ISBN-13: 9780471316275

Pub. Date: 12/21/1998

Publisher: Wiley

It includes both chemical and physical approaches to the properties of solids, and clearly separates those aspects of materials properties that can be tackled with classical physics from those that require quantum mechanics.

• Quantum mechanics are introduced later to allow readers to be familiar with some of the mathematics necessary for quantum mechanics

Overview

It includes both chemical and physical approaches to the properties of solids, and clearly separates those aspects of materials properties that can be tackled with classical physics from those that require quantum mechanics.

• Quantum mechanics are introduced later to allow readers to be familiar with some of the mathematics necessary for quantum mechanics before being exposed to its bewildering fundamental concepts.

• Discusses the electronic properties of solids from the viewpoint of elementary band theory, and end with a brief treatment of semiconductors and some semiconducting devices.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780471316275
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
12/21/1998
Series:
Mit Series in Materials Science and Engineering
Pages:
336
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.80(d)

Table of Contents

SEMI-CLASSICAL APPROACH.

Conductors and Resistors.

Windows, Doors, and Transparent Electrodes (Optical Properties of Conductors).

Insulators and Capacitors.

Lenses and Optical Fibers (Optical Properties of Insulators).

Inductors, Electromagnets, and Permanent Magnets.

Superconductors and Superconducting Magnets.

Elasticity, Springs, and Sonic Waves.

QUANTUM MECHANICAL APPROACH.

Light Particles, Electron Waves, and Quantum Wells, and Springs.

The Periodic Table, Atomic Spectra, and Neon Lights.

The Game Is Bonds, Interatomic Bonds.

From Bonds to Bands (and Why Grass Is Green).

Free Electron Waves in Metals.

Nearly-Free Electrons—Bands, Gaps, Holes, and Zones.

Metals and Insulators.

Semiconductors.

LEDs, Photodetectors, Solar Cells, and Transistors.

Suggestions for Further Reading.

Index.

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