Elemental

( 20 )

Overview

A lost colony is reborn in this heart-pounding fantasy adventure set in the near future. Enter the world of the Elementals, which James Dashner called “completely gripping and full of intrigue, revelation, mystery, and suspense.”
 
Sixteen-year-old Thomas has always been an outsider. The first child born without the power of an element—earth, water, wind, or fire—he has ...

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Elemental

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Overview

A lost colony is reborn in this heart-pounding fantasy adventure set in the near future. Enter the world of the Elementals, which James Dashner called “completely gripping and full of intrigue, revelation, mystery, and suspense.”
 
Sixteen-year-old Thomas has always been an outsider. The first child born without the power of an element—earth, water, wind, or fire—he has little to offer his tiny, remote Outer Banks colony. Or so the Guardians would have him believe.
 
In the wake of an unforeseen storm, desperate pirates kidnap the Guardians, intent on claiming the island as their own. Caught between the Plague-ridden mainland and the advancing pirates, Thomas and his friends fight for survival in the battered remains of a mysterious abandoned settlement. But the secrets they unearth will turn Thomas’s world upside-down, and bring to light not only a treacherous past but also a future more dangerous than he can possibly imagine.
 
Written by an award-winning author, this dynamic series is perfect for fans of dystopian thrillers like James Dashner’s The Maze Runner and Marie Lu’s Legend.

“Plenty of action for readers who enjoy survival stories with a twist of the supernatural and a hint of romance.” –School Library Journal

“The novel’s captivating storyline, rapid pace, and cliffhanger ending are sure to leave fans of novels like Grant’s Gone series absorbed with the action and anxious for a sequel.” –Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

"Engaging characters and plenty of mystery, adventure, and action." -Publishers Weekly

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In this postapocalyptic tale, first in a planned trilogy, a small colony of 15 survives on the island of Hatteras off the coast of North Carolina, their return to the mainland prevented by plague. Sixteen-year-old Thomas is treated like an untouchable by the colony’s Guardians because he is the only person on the island who lacks the power to control one of the four elements—earth, wind, water, or fire. When a hurricane threatens, Thomas and the colony’s other youths are sent to shelter on nearby Roanoke Island, only to discover that they have thus escaped a surprise attack by pirates whose captain believes that Thomas or his deaf brother holds the key to ending the plague. When Thomas and the others fight back, he learns he is not as powerless as he thought. John (Five Flavors of Dumb) hits several standard postapocalyptic tropes (plague, isolated community as sole bastion of civilization, scapegoated protagonist uncovering secrets), but creates engaging characters and provides plenty of mystery, adventure, and action. Ages 12–up. Agent: Ted Malawer, Upstart Crow Literary. (Nov.)
review feed
Praise for Elemental:

"Engaging characters and plenty of mystery, adventure, and action." -Publishers Weekly

“Plenty of action for readers who enjoy survival stories with a twist of the supernatural and a hint of romance.” –School Library Journal

“The novel’s captivating storyline, rapid pace, and cliffhanger ending are sure to leave fans of novels like Grant’s Gone series absorbed with the action and anxious for a sequel.” –Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

From the Publisher
Praise for Elemental:

"Engaging characters and plenty of mystery, adventure, and action." -Publishers Weekly

“Plenty of action for readers who enjoy survival stories with a twist of the supernatural and a hint of romance.” –School Library Journal

“The novel’s captivating storyline, rapid pace, and cliffhanger ending are sure to leave fans of novels like Grant’s Gone series absorbed with the action and anxious for a sequel.” –Bulletin of the Center for Children's Booksreview feed

Children's Literature - Zella Cunningham
When the Guardians of a small colony of survivors are kidnapped from Hatteras Island, a small parcel of land off the coast of Roanoke, North Carolina, by pirates, the five remaining members must work together to rescue them. Before the plan can be carried out Thomas, Alice, Rose, Dennis, and Griffin, all below the age of twenty, suffer the loss of their innocence. The beliefs and family history told to them by the Guardians which shaped their actions and lives, are slowly revealed to be lies. But why would the Guardians lie? Why were they living in cabins on a small island with meager supplies when well-stocked Roanoke Island is just a short canoe ride away? Some questions are answered as the story unfolds. But the answers lead to more questions. Each person in the colony has been born with the gift of heightened awareness of an element: earth, fire, water, or wind. Everyone, it seems, except sixteen-year-old Thomas. Fifteen-year-old Alice's element is fire. Rose can read water. Dennis, the youngest member of the colony can predict storms using his wind element. And Griffin, Thomas' younger brother, although deaf, controls the element of earth. Thomas is treated differently by the others. His father is the only person who will touch him. The intriguing storyline urges the reader to keep turning pages, chapter after chapter. The final chapter raises more questions. Well-developed characters and an engaging, mystery loaded plot has appeal for the young adult reader. The promise of a continuing series is eagerly welcome. Reviewer: Zella Cunningham
VOYA - Rebecca Moore
In the future, a rat-borne plague has rendered the American mainland unlivable, so sixteen-year-old Thom's family lives in a tiny colony on Hatteras Island. Everyone save Thom has a magic-like "elemental" gift that helps the colony, so Thom's lack makes him worth "nothing." Only his father will even touch him, and doubtless his dreams of the lovely Rose and iconoclastic Alice will end in heartbreak. Then pirates come while all the teens are sheltering from a hurricane in nearby Roanoke, in a ruined town of forbidden preplague wonders. When the teens discover that the pirates have captured the adults and are coming for them—led by Captain Dare—they know they must act. As they strive to rescue their parents and themselves, the teens begin to uncover the secrets of Roanoke, their families' pasts, and themselves. Shades of the lost colony of Roanoke thread through this well-constructed and suspenseful dystopia, where secrets pile on secrets like dune sand—so many secrets that some readers may grow frustrated by the author's parsimonious explanations. The explanations are so incomplete that much remains unknown by the cliff-hanger ending, so a sequel clearly lies in the future. All the characters, however, are well-drawn and idiosyncratic—Thom is particularly sympathetic—making the human story as compelling as the enigmas of Roanoke and the Hatteras colonists. The descriptions of the physical world are lush and evocative as well. Recommend this to students who prefer their dystopias more enigmatic than desperate, though still with some violence. Reviewer: Rebecca Moore
VOYA - Alisa Billig
This story starts out with the opposite premise of usual fantasy books—the main character's superpower is his lack of one. This creates an unexpectedly emotional story of survival and self-discovery. Although a little too fast-paced and sometimes overly dramatic, the book offers a surprisingly accurate portrayal of human emotions. Fantasy readers who prefer more character development and fewer battle scenes will enjoy it. Elemental is best for middle schoolers with short attention spans. Reviewer: Alisa Billig, Teen Reviewer
VOYA - Tapan Srivastava
John paints a descriptive picture, allowing readers to envision Skeleton Island (Roanoke), the pirates, and their ships. He also allows Alice, Thom, and Rose to grow, both together and individually, with Alice exploring the islands and Thom learning to keep his own secrets. In addition, John uses the adult Guardians to add questions and secrets to the islands, keeping readers in a state of confusion and curiosity. Elemental will appeal to teen mystery readers. Reviewer: Tapan Srivastava, Teen Reviewer
School Library Journal
Gr 6–10—When plague hit the mainland United States, a few people managed to escape to the Outer Banks. Now, 16-year-old Thomas is the only person on Hatteras Island without an Element, the supernatural ability to manipulate air, fire, earth, or water. When pirates kidnap the adults and attempt to take the island for their own, Thomas; his deaf younger brother; his best friend, Alice; his would-be girlfriend, Rose; and Rose's little brother hide out on Roanoke Island, where an abandoned community has been reduced to rubble in the wake of the plague and treacherous storms. As they defend themselves against desperate pirates, the teens slowly discover that their Guardians have been hiding secrets-particularly about Thomas-that could cost all of them their lives. A confusing start makes way for plenty of action for readers who enjoy survival stories with a twist of the supernatural and a hint of romance. Thomas and Alice are the focal characters as both are instrumental in defending the island. The eerie setting, with its skeletal buildings and mysterious past, is practically a character in itself. The mystery builds so slowly that some readers might abandon Elemental before the action really kicks in. For that reason, it is best recommended to patient readers who, like the characters, will fight for answers that don't come easily.—Leigh Collazo, Ed Willkie Middle School, Fort Worth, TX
Kirkus Reviews
The lost colony of Roanoke Island meets Captain Kidd. Sixteen-year-old Thomas lives on Hatteras Island in a colony protected by the Guardians, a group of elders with magical powers fueled by the elements: water, fire, wind and water. Their children have inherited their special gifts--except for Thomas. His deaf younger brother, Griffin, however, is a seer who has visions of the future that are sometimes horrific and cause him to have seizures. The Guardians moved the colony to Hatteras to escape a plague that wiped out all other human life on the mainland. Now the colony is under siege by pirates who have kidnapped everyone but Thomas, Griffin and three other kids. John's post-apocalyptic alternate history starts off with a whine, but the pace and the mystery pick up once the adults are captured and the kids are left on their own. Characterizations don't dip too far below the surface, except when G-rated sparks flicker between Thomas and one of the teen girls stranded with him. Enter Captain Dare, the cutthroat leader of the pirates who attacked the colony. His presence, along with some old maps and paper fragments with the name "Virginia" scrawled on them point to a sequel. Readers may not catch all the loose historical connections, but they'll like the action in this occasionally exciting story of survival. (Post-apocalyptic adventure. 12-16)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780142425169
  • Publisher: Penguin Young Readers Group
  • Publication date: 11/14/2013
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 352
  • Sales rank: 177,697
  • Age range: 12 years
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.20 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Antony John is the Schneider Award-winning author of Five Flavors of Dumb and Thou Shalt Not Road Trip. For many years he lived in North Carolina and was a regular visitor to the Outer Banks. He was bewitched by the beauty of the landscape and fascinated by the legends that surround them. Although Elemental is set in the future, it has its origins in the islands’ remote past—an era of sailing ships, small, independent colonies, and still-unsolved mysteries. Antony now lives with his family in St. Louis, Missouri.

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Read an Excerpt

AFTER THE STORM CAME THE PIRATES. . . .

I’d been lying awake for half a strike when the door flew open and Dennis’s footsteps pounded against the stairs. “Thomas, we need you,” he shouted. “Something’s wrong.”

Alice was up in a flash, long legs flying across the shelter and onto the steps. I sprinted after her. Outside, I took a deep breath and followed their gazes across the sound to our colony on Hatteras Island.

“I can’t see anything through the cloud,” I said, rubbing my eyes.

Alice shook her head. “That’s not a cloud. It’s smoke.” She took a hesitant step forward. “Our island is on fire.”

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CHAPTER 1

Thunder rattled the aging wooden cabins, but no one stopped to listen. There wasn’t time for that. The coming storm was written in every distant flash of lightning, and in the sick, heavy clouds hanging over the ocean. The pelicans flying by in tight formation groaned in warning. Even the air tasted strange and unnatural.

So how had Kyte, Guardian of the Wind, missed it completely?

Usually Kyte predicted storms a day in advance. He’d tell us how strong the wind would be. With a Guardian of the Water, he’d warn how high the ocean would rise. And though I found it hard to imagine the clear blue sky roiling with clouds, and the usually calm ocean turned inside out, I knew better than to doubt him. It was his element, after all.

“Swell rising,” yelled Kyte. He crouched beside a stick planted firmly in the sand. It marked the highest point he expected the ocean to reach. As everyone turned to look, the water washed right over it and dragged it out to sea.

He closed his eyes. Tension carved lines in his face. He was engaging his element, but it had never looked so difficult before.

“Wind speed increasing,” shouted another Guardian.

“I know. It’s my element,” exclaimed Kyte, as though he owned the wind itself, not just the ability to read it.

Meanwhile, my father stood side by side with my older brother, Ananias, at the colony’s rainwater harvester. They looked alike: same thick, dark hair and serious expression. They conjured sparks from their fingertips, tiny flames that grew and combined into a white-hot glow. Ananias directed the heat onto a bent nail while our father straightened it and drove it back into the oak paneling. However bad the storm might be, we couldn’t afford to lose our only water source.

All the Guardians were busy now, their elements in full effect. As the first and only child born without an element, I watched them enviously. I couldn’t summon fire, unearth food, predict storms, or catch fish barehanded. But I could toss sandbags against the stilts supporting our cabin, and so I did—one after another, as my arms burned and sweat poured down my forehead.

“Shouldn’t you be loading the evacuation canoes, Thomas?” Kyte’s voice was low and threatening.

“Alice is taking the last bags now,” I said, pointing to the girl sprinting across the beach—sure-footed and powerful—two bulky canvas bags slung across her shoulders.

He followed my eyes, and shouted: “Do you like having to do everything yourself, Alice?”

As she turned her head, the wind tousled her dark hair. She peered at Kyte from the corner of her eye, but she didn’t answer.

“I’m talking to you, Alice!”

She dropped the bags. “Does it matter what I like?” Her eyes drifted to me, and she cocked an eyebrow. “Anyway, you’ve spent years trying to keep Thom and me apart. Why do you want him to help me now?”

Kyte’s face reddened. “How dare you speak to a Guardian like that? You’re not an Apprentice yet, remember.”

“And I hope I never will be.” She smiled. “Are we done now?”

The other Guardians stopped what they were doing, and watched with interest. Kyte obviously knew it too. He’d have to take action—punish Alice yet again—just to save face. It was all so predictable.

Couldn’t we have just one afternoon without Alice battling the Guardians head-on, when she could be spared their pointless attempts to tame her? The storm would be upon us soon. There wasn’t time for this.

“Why do you think you missed this storm, Guardian Kyte?” I asked. The words came out quickly, a thinly veiled attempt to distract him. “Since your element is wind.”

Kyte’s mouth twisted into a mocking smile. “Why? Did you foresee it before me, Thomas? Did you just forget to mention it to us?”

I sensed the Guardians’ stares shifting to me. “I wasn’t meaning to criticize. It’s just strange. Almost like your element didn’t . . .”

“What? Like my element didn’t what?” Kyte lifted a sandbag as though it weighed nothing and launched it several yards. “I’d think that you of all people would have more respect for the elements.”

Without a sound, my younger brother, Griffin, joined me. Being deaf, he’d learned to read the Guardians’ body language better than anyone. Having him beside me should have been a warning to say nothing. But I’d only spoken up to save Alice.

“I’m just trying to understand.”

“And you think now is the time for that?” Kyte raised his hands toward the darkening sky. “Some of us have work to do, and not enough time to do it. Can you at least respect that?”

My pulse raced. Anger coursed through me. “You wouldn’t be in such a hurry if you’d predicted the storm like you’re supposed to.”

“Until you have something to offer this colony,” he spat, “I suggest you keep your thoughts to yourself.”

“Exactly,” echoed my father. I hadn’t heard him approach. He placed a reassuring hand on my shoulder, but his voice was loud and fierce. He fixed his eyes on Kyte. “After all, those with elements should always be allowed to speak.”

“True. And if Thomas discovers an element, I’ll be sure to listen.”

“And how do you suggest he finds one?”

Kyte shrugged, but the mocking smile was back. “It’s difficult, for sure. Especially so late in childhood.”

My father’s grip tightened. Pain swept through me. “As things stand, he’s nothing.”

“As you say,” returned Kyte smoothly. “Nothing.”

I felt anger flash through my father’s claw-like fingers—sharp enough to make me wince—and then he pulled away. I waited for him to come to my defense again, to match Kyte word for word. He’d supported me for sixteen years. I expected nothing less now. But when I looked at him, it was as if he was done fighting. Or worse, as if he agreed with Kyte.

Nothing. The word hung in the air like a fork of lightning seen long after it has vanished. Of course it was difficult for Father to have a son with no element—it was even harder for me—but he’d always told me to be patient. Had he been lying all those years? Was this how he really felt?

There were only fifteen people in our colony, but every single one of them stood still and silent, eyes fixed uneasily on the ground.

My hands balled into fists by my sides. My heart beat wildly. I can throw insults too, I thought. I could’ve asked Kyte why his weather predictions were increasingly unreliable. I could’ve asked my father why his element was so much weaker than his oldest son’s.

But I didn’t say anything. Because in the end, they still had an element, and I didn’t. Something was better than nothing.

I kept my head up and began to walk—quick, uneven strides that couldn’t carry me away fast enough. My father called to me, but I didn’t turn back. As soon as I crossed the dunes, I broke into a run. Sand slipped beneath me. I couldn’t seem to get a grip on anything—the earth, my pulse, my life.

I didn’t stop running until I reached the narrow woods that ran like a spine down the center of Hatteras Island. I placed my left hand against a pine tree and punched the trunk with my right. Mosquitoes landed on me, and I didn’t flick them away. I closed my eyes and welcomed a different kind of pain.

“Are you all right?”

I spun around. Alice stood before me, bags still hanging from her shoulders. She must have run too, but she didn’t even seem out of breath.

“I’m fine.”

“Liar.” Her blue eyes blazed. She was a year younger than me, but that was easy to forget when she was angry. “Ignore them, Thom. Ignore them all.”

“Easy for you to say.”

“Why? Because I have an element, and you don’t?” She snorted. “I can barely conjure a spark, let alone make a fire. It’s a pathetic excuse for an element, and you know it.”

“At least it’s something.”

She dropped the bags and folded her long tan arms. Sinewy muscles showed through the dull coat of white sand. “When are you going to start fighting back?”

“I just did, remember?”

“I don’t mean for me, or Griffin. I mean for you.”

“Who should I be fighting? Kyte?”

“Anyone. Everyone. Go ahead and hurt them. Do it so they’ll never look at you the same way again.”

“Is that how you got so popular?”

Alice just smiled. “See? So much anger inside you. You need to let it out.”

There was a rustle behind us. A girl stood beneath the canopy of a young tree. She fingered the ends of her long blond hair anxiously.

Alice huffed. “What a surprise. I didn’t expect Kyte to send you so soon, Rose. I figured he had more important things to do than worry about Thom and me.”

“My father didn’t send me.”

“Course not.” Alice retrieved her bags and walked away. She didn’t look back.

Once Alice was out of sight, Rose knelt down on a bed of pine needles. She tugged the ends of her white tunic toward her knees, but the material rode up again. Her skin was smooth and pale, unblemished by scars. “My father shouldn’t say those things to you,” she murmured, voice almost lost on the wind.

I sat down with my back against the trunk. “Have you told him that?”

She looked away. Suddenly I felt guilty instead of angry.

“Alice doesn’t think an element is important,” I said. “But she’s wrong. If I had yours—if I could read water the way you do—everything would be different.”

Unlike Alice, Rose didn’t disagree. I was grateful for that. “You’ll find your element,” she said, summoning a smile. “I’m sure of it.”

“Why do you keep saying that? You swam like a fish before you could walk. Elements reveal themselves early. Not when you’re sixteen.”

Her smile never faltered. “Look at your brother. Griffin’s right leg doesn’t work properly. He has ears, but he can’t hear. Maybe you have an element, and it just doesn’t work.”

I wanted to believe her, but I’d already passed the age of Apprenticeship. There would be no silver lining to the cloud that had followed me my entire life.

A gust of wind bent the trees and scattered the needles. The first drops of rain came with it.

“I believe in you, Thomas,” she said. “Always have. I want you to know that.”

For a moment, she held my gaze, and I knew that she was telling the truth. I might be nothing to the colony, but I mattered to Rose. Her fingers drifted to the wooden bangle on her left wrist. She twisted it around and around. It was what she always did when she was nervous.

She had carved the bangle herself. Just as she’d sewn the band of white cloth that held her hair back from her face, and the pretty linen tunic that fit her so differently than the ones stitched together by the Guardians.

My pulse quickened again, but this time there was no hint of anger. Instead I felt something even more powerful. Something I’d been feeling more and more over the past two years. Something that left me as empty as having no element.

“We should go,” I said quickly, before my face gave me away.

I pulled myself up and offered my hand to Rose. She didn’t take it, though. Then again, no one but my father touched me, or held me. It was as if having no element was contagious. And who could risk losing their greatest power?

Rose stood now. She was much shorter than me, but looking at her was like watching myself: same unsure expression, same way of shuffling her feet like she wasn’t sure what to do with them. Was she thinking the same thing as me too? Deep down, did she want to touch me as much as I wanted to touch her?

“You’re right,” she said, breaking the connection. “We should go.”

No. An element wasn’t the only thing I’d never have.

CHAPTER 2

Three canoes sat on the creek, filled with bags of supplies and fresh water in canisters—enough for an overnight stay in the hurricane shelter. Usually I’d have been dreading a trip to the smelly, sweaty shelter on Roanoke Island, two miles to the west. Not this time, though. For once I could only think of getting away—from the Guardians’ stares, and my father’s lies, and the colony that felt smaller every day.

With a lingering gaze at me, Rose climbed into the front of the canoe on the left. Her brother, Dennis, the youngest member of the colony at nine years old, joined her. He pressed his hands against his head as if it hurt. Rose rubbed his back gently.

Alice already sat at the helm of the middle canoe. She rolled up the sleeves of her dirty, misshapen blue tunic, and grasped the paddle tightly, eager to get moving. As her older sister, Eleanor, shared yet another embrace with their father, Alice rolled her eyes. Or perhaps that gesture was intended for her grandmother, Guardian Lora, who sat in the middle of the sisters’ canoe and complained to nobody in particular that the rain was increasing. The other Guardians claimed that Lora was coming along to look after us, but we all knew it was because she was too old and frail to ride out the storm in the colony.

I followed Lora’s eyes to the clouds. We’d never set off so late before. I wondered if we’d make it across before lightning hit. If I’d had the element of wind, I’d have known the answer. If I’d had the element of water, I’d have been attuned to the swell, the tempo of the incoming tide.

I had nothing.

I took my usual place at the rear of our oak canoe. It tilted from side to side, but I barely noticed. We spent so much of our lives on water that the constant movements felt as familiar as the gentle give of sand on the beach. Griffin sat in the middle and faced me so that he could communicate with his hands during the crossing.

Meanwhile, in the bow seat up front, Ananias conferred with our father. He spoke with the confidence of a boy who’d been treated as an adult for years—though he was only eighteen. When they were done, Father waded toward Griffin and me. He paused beside Griffin, but when he leaned forward, it was me he hugged. He gripped my hair between his fingers and held me tight.

“I’m sorry,” he whispered fiercely. “You have no idea how sorry I am. None of this is your fault. I need you to remember that. Always.”

I felt tense in his arms. I wanted to scream that it didn’t matter whose fault it was. Was it any consolation for Griffin to know that his limp wasn’t his fault? Or his deafness? Or those sinister visions that kept everyone at arm’s length? No. Griffin and I were more than brothers. We were the colony’s outcasts, the constant reminders that not everything is created perfect. Knowing it wasn’t my fault didn’t change that at all.

“I’m sorry,” he said again, breaths ragged in my ear. He was squeezing me so hard I could barely breathe. Something rushed through me then, like a message direct from his heart, begging for forgiveness. Against my will, it calmed me. I hugged him back.

“It’s all right,” I said, even though we both knew it wasn’t. “I’m all right.”

As soon as he let go, I knew I’d done the right thing. He looked so grateful.

Finally, he turned to Griffin. Father never held him the way he held Ananias and me, but this time was different. Still smiling, he took a deep breath and rested his hands on Griffin’s bony shoulders.

Griffin’s eyes grew wide in astonishment, and his face opened like a sun breaking through clouds. For a precious moment, everything seemed right.

But then the smile disappeared. His expression shifted. He looked frightened—horrified, even.

That’s when the noise began.

At first it was a low sound, like waves breaking in the distance, but it had a knife-like edge that made Ananias spin around instantly. We dropped our paddles and crawled toward Griffin. He’d already grasped Father’s hands and locked on. Father tried to pull away, muscles bulging beneath his dirty cloth shirt, but it was futile.

Almost everyone in the colony had seen Griffin like this before, overcome by a blind panic that gave him superhuman strength. For years I’d tried to block out the memory of those moments—or what followed—but as Griffin’s voice twisted into a keening wail, I couldn’t think of anything else.

I lunged at Griffin and sent him tumbling onto the hard bottom of the canoe. Father stumbled back and collapsed into the waist-deep water. With the wind knocked out of him, Griffin struggled to breathe, let alone make a sound, but I could tell he’d snapped out of the trance now. There wouldn’t be any more moaning, just a faint whimpering as he curled up in a ball.

I didn’t need to look around to know that we were being watched. I could literally feel the silence. Everyone in the colony remembered hearing that sound, and what had followed.

“We don’t need to go,” Dennis cried, his voice high-pitched and desperate. “It’s a storm, nothing more.”

Kyte shook his head. “We’ll not take that chance, son.”

“Then come with us. It’s not a really bad storm, I promise. That’s why you didn’t foresee it—”

“Enough!” Kyte was clearly embarrassed at having his weather prediction challenged by his own son. “It’s time you left. Paddle evenly. Conserve your water.”

Paddle evenly. Conserve your water. This is what the Guardians said every time we set off for another stay in the hurricane shelter. Following these words, we’d dig our paddles into the murky green water and watch them create eddies as the canoes slid forward. We’d laugh at our own strength and Alice’s determined attempts to get to Roanoke Island first, like this was a race, not an evacuation. And we’d secretly revel in the knowledge that the only person of authority would be Guardian Lora, who was too weak to walk unaided, let alone control seven of us.

Now there was no laughing. No reveling. No one moved.

“He said go!” My father’s voice lashed at us, fueled by fear and anger.

As I scanned everyone’s faces, they looked away. They pitied my brothers and me, I was certain. The first time Griffin behaved this way had been nine years before, while he’d been sitting on the beach with Rose’s grandparents. One moment, they’d held him fast; the next, his little hands had gotten such a grip on them they couldn’t pull away. When they’d launched a sailboat that afternoon, it had taken three Guardians to hold Griffin back, even though he was only four years old. We hadn’t even recovered from the shock when the meaning became clear: Rose’s grandparents’ boat capsized in a sudden squall. Their bodies were never recovered.

Three years later, Griffin had latched on to a boy named John as we played on a rope swing. We’d pulled Griffin away then too, and John had climbed the tree, laughing. But he hadn’t gripped the rope properly, and fell. He’d been so still that we were sure he was just pretending to be injured. Then we saw the stream of blood.

After the grieving period, the Guardians had made me explain to Griffin that he wasn’t to blame. I’d done as they asked, though I wasn’t sure whether they were trying to convince him or themselves. It was the last day anyone had willingly touched my brother. No one wanted to be his next victim.

I knew that Griffin hadn’t caused the deaths, of course; it was more like he somehow knew a bad thing was going to happen to someone before it actually did. He wasn’t the first person in my family to have the ability either. I’d grown up hearing rumors about my mother’s “talent” for foreseeing future catastrophes—even heard people wonder aloud if she was somehow the cause of them.

I’d always told myself that it was wrong for the Guardians to say such things when she wasn’t around to defend herself. Then one night, as Griffin slept peacefully in a cot beside us, my father told Ananias and me that our mother had indeed been a seer, just like her mother before her. But all she had been able to foresee was death, and since no one had wanted to spend their final moments in fear of a fate they couldn’t avoid, they were wary of her.

Like mother, like son.

Now I stared at my father, saturated and shaking. I wanted to ask him if he was as frightened as I was, but I couldn’t. We had an audience, and he was determined to appear strong. Instead I knelt beside Griffin, still curled up in the bottom of the canoe. Making sure I had his attention, I placed a finger against my chest and pulled my mouth into a frown. Finally, I pointed to him: I. Sorry. You.

He watched each gesture with a glazed expression, and when I finished he didn’t sign back. I needed to see him touch his heart, to show that he forgave me. After all, we weren’t just brothers—we were confidants, fellow outcasts. Strangers in our own colony. But I knew he wouldn’t—or couldn’t—do it. The last time he’d had a seizure, he hadn’t communicated for a full day afterward. No words or laughter, just emptiness.

I glanced at Ananias, and wished I hadn’t. Gone was the Apprentice, the boy with the confidence of a Guardian. Now he looked as panicked as I felt. Neither of us was ready to go, but the Guardians wouldn’t allow us to stay. Silence weighed heavily, and somehow I knew that only we could break it.

I picked up the paddle and nodded to Ananias that it was time to go. He followed me in a daze. Neither of us said good-bye to our father—it was as though the word had changed meaning, become too final. Instead, we drove our paddles into the water and propelled ourselves away. For a dozen strokes I closed my eyes and focused on the splashing sound, and the monotony helped me to forget.

But then I glanced down at Griffin, and realized he was staring at the receding figure of our father. He didn’t even blink. It was like he wanted to take in as much of the man as possible before he disappeared forever.

CHAPTER 3

Halfway across the sound—the waterway separating our colony on Hatteras Island from Roanoke Island—the rain became torrential. Heavy drops collected in pools around Griffin’s legs, but he didn’t seem to notice. He was as silent now as he had been loud before.

We fought our way through choppy water around tiny Pond Island and followed the hulking bridge to the eastern shore of Roanoke Island. The bridge was old and decrepit—remnant of a long-ago civilization—and a small section was missing from the middle, making it difficult to cross. The Guardians had left strong wooden planks on either side of the gap, which could be lowered in case of emergency; but walking on a long, narrow board eighty feet above the water was something only Alice wanted to try. Besides, the canoes were faster, and could carry more provisions.

We paddled hard along one of the channels that cut into Roanoke Island. At the end, we tethered the canoes to a pontoon. Alice and Eleanor unloaded their supplies as Lora muttered curses.

“Let me rest,” the old woman groaned. She was standing knee-deep in the water, fragile arms clinging to the pontoon. “I believe you would have me die out here, Alice.”

Alice caught my eye. As gusts of wind whipped at her tunic, I’d swear she smiled a little. “I hadn’t thought of that, Lora,” she said. “Not until now, anyway.”

Eleanor cast her sister a warning glance, but it was pointless. Despite their physical similarities—they were both tall and willowy—their temperaments were as strikingly different as their hair: long, curling brown locks for Eleanor, and unkempt raven-black hair for Alice. Where Eleanor glided with gentle grace, Alice carried the energy of an all-consuming storm. Where Eleanor seemed to look through people to the weather beyond, Alice stared at them with a blazing intensity that dared them to look away. Everyone adored Eleanor. Alice counted me as her only friend. Then again, she frustrated the Guardians even more than I did. How could I not have liked her?

Lora picked up on Alice’s defiant tone, and cocked her head. “What was that? What did you say, child?” She emphasized the word child, as if she weren’t completely at Alice’s mercy.

Alice just smiled. She would be turning sixteen in a few months. Her element was unusually weak, but she’d still be honored with the title Apprentice of the Fire. There would be a celebration. A feast. She certainly wouldn’t suffer through a halfhearted meal passed in cold silence, as I had done. She wouldn’t have to press her hands against her ears to block out her father’s tirade. She wouldn’t be granted an additional year to discover her element—simply putting off the moment when the Guardians would acknowledge she had no element at all.

“Thomas. . . . Thomas!” Ananias stood over me. Rain ran down his face. “Can you help Griffin?”

It wasn’t really a question, but I nodded anyway. “Are you all right?” I asked.

Ananias secured our canoe to the pontoon with deliberate slowness. He knew what I really meant. “Griffin could be wrong.”

“He’s never been wrong before.”

“But Father knows there’s danger now. He’ll be on his guard. So will everyone else.” He spoke earnestly, like he really wanted to believe what he was saying. But behind the stubble and the serious brows, he looked concerned.

I turned to Griffin. He hadn’t moved at all. One side of his body was submerged in rainwater. We go, I signed.

Griffin blinked, but he didn’t reply.

We go, I repeated. I waved my arm in a wide arc above my head to signify the weather. Storm.

He sat up, shivering.

I pulled off his saturated cloth shirt and gave him the spare from my canvas bag. I knew he’d be drenched again before we reached the shelter, but I just wanted him to stop shaking for a moment. He pulled on the shirt without looking at me.

Ananias took my bag so I could stay with Griffin. But Griffin either didn’t need my help, or didn’t want it. Without even a glance in my direction he crawled out of the canoe and onto the pontoon. Then he followed the others along the cracked road, fighting wind and rain, his weak right leg sliding through dirty puddles.

Finally only Alice and Lora remained. “Come on,” grumbled Lora as I approached. She didn’t look up. “Alice has me propped up against this pontoon like a ship’s figurehead.”

“Or a lightning rod,” offered Alice cheerily.

When I drew close, Lora’s expression shifted. “Oh, it’s you,” she said, startled. “Where’s Ananias?”

“Carrying our bags.”

She opened her mouth as if to speak, but sighed instead. “Well, you can carry my bag, then.”

“Don’t you need support?”

“Alice’s help will be enough.” She fixed me with her withering gaze. “I’m not an invalid yet.”

I stared right back. For once, it was Lora who looked away first.

We trudged along the half-mile stretch of road that led to the hurricane shelter. To either side, marsh gave way to scrub grass, and then the ground was littered with rubble, the remains of a bigger settlement. No one knew precisely when the area had been abandoned, or why, but it was impossible not to marvel at what the colonists had accomplished: buildings of smooth stone, and bridges that soared for a mile or more across the waterways. And a hurricane shelter that was still miraculously intact after who knew how many years?

Near the shelter the crumbling road intersected with another, equally battered one. The buildings still stood here, in various states of disrepair. I’d named the place Skeleton Town after them; they reminded me of the rotting fish that sometimes washed ashore on the beach. The name had stuck ever since.

I wondered how Lora felt, returning here now. Her husband had died in one of the buildings—fell through a rotten floorboard and slid deep into a hidden shaft. The walls had collapsed on top of him. The Guardians had attempted to pull him out with ropes, but it was no use. He was completely trapped. Lora had passed him food and water and talked to him until, finally, he’d stopped answering.

Every one of us had been hurt here at some point: mostly from the broken glass littered around the buildings. The safest place was the center of the road. No one deviated far from it.

I glanced at the buildings to either side. Where had the strange materials come from? What had destroyed the place? Why did the colonists leave? Skeleton Town was one gigantic mystery, and every time we returned I found it more fascinating.

Suddenly, there was a flash of movement in the building to my left—a person, I thought, although that was impossible. I stared through the remains of a window. Broken furniture littered the floor. Shelves dangled from the walls at awkward angles. But there was no movement. It must have been the wind and rain playing tricks on me.

When we reached the intersection, Alice whistled. “Just look at these buildings,” she said. “I reckon there were hundreds of people living here once. Why do you think they left, Guardian Lora?”

“I don’t know. It was uninhabited when we discovered it many years ago.” It was Lora’s usual reply.

“But you must’ve thought about it.”

“Well, it was probably the Plague. Like on the mainland.”

“But there was no sign of the Plague when you settled here, right?”

“No. I suppose not.”

“Hmm.” Alice paused. “Mother says Skeleton Town may have been destroyed in the storm that grounded your ship on Hatteras Island.”

“Possibly.”

“I don’t think so. There’s no way everyone on board would’ve survived a storm that was powerful enough to destroy a town.” She clicked her tongue. “Which reminds me: Why didn’t Kyte predict that storm?”

“For the same reason he missed today’s. Nobody’s perfect, Alice. You of all people should be aware of that.”

Lora no doubt sensed that Alice’s questions were far from over—she clamped her mouth shut and stared straight ahead. None of the Guardians liked to discuss the hazardous voyage that had brought them to Hatteras Island years before we were born. All we knew for certain was that they had taken to the ocean in a desperate attempt to escape the Plague.

They weren’t alone, either. Every now and then we’d glimpse clan ships on the horizon. The crews never disembarked, but sometimes they anchored offshore and the Guardians would row out to trade with them. When they departed, the fifty or so people on board—young and old—would stand against the rail and wave to us. Those were the only times we could be sure we weren’t alone in the world.

We shuffled on in a slow-moving line as clouds raced by and rain pummeled us.

“Why don’t the clan folk ever stay?” I asked. “They could tell us about the ocean, and what’s beyond it, right?”

“No. They’ll not risk bringing Plague aboard their ship,” replied Lora, clearly more at ease with my questions than Alice’s.

“But there are no rats on Hatteras.”

“They don’t know that for certain. And we don’t know there aren’t rats on their ship. Have you forgotten what happened after John died?”

No, I hadn’t forgotten. His parents had been distraught, unable to cope. So had his older sister, Elizabeth; she’d loved her brother, and when he was gone, she’d felt alone and neglected. Everyone had known it, but no one had intervened. We’d simply given the family room to grieve.

Elizabeth hadn’t grieved. She’d escaped.

She’d taken a sailboat and headed for the mainland. Her parents had chased after her in a canoe, but didn’t reach her until the next day. By the time they’d brought her home, she was showing early signs of Plague: chills, fever, seizures, and swelling around her groin. So they’d carried her to an abandoned cabin several hundred yards from the rest of the colony.

I remembered my father imploring them to cover their mouths and bodies, but they hadn’t listened. By the following day, they had the Plague too.

I never saw them after that. My father said they had asked him to divvy up their belongings. Then they’d taken a package of food and water, and paddled over to Roanoke Island, the three of them together. Ten days later, Father had crossed the bridge. We’d stood on the shore and watched him go, saw smoke from the fire he’d started to burn their decomposing remains. He’d rowed their canoe back, alone, and hadn’t spoken for a week.

I hadn’t forgotten that at all.

“If the people on the clan ships won’t come ashore,” pressed Alice, “how do they survive? How do they have anything to trade?”

“There are other colonies besides ours.”

“What other colonies?” I asked. For a moment I shared Alice’s frustration at Lora’s dead-end answers. To me, she seemed entirely full of secrets—important ones. “Where are they? Why haven’t we met people from them?”

“Everyone has a place in the world,” replied Lora, “and this is ours.”

“Now, yes,” agreed Alice as we arrived at the shelter. “But what about before the shipwreck? Why won’t you tell us where you came from?”

Lora stopped in her tracks, and despite her frailty, it was Alice who almost toppled over. Lora kept hold of her granddaughter, and clasped my arm too. I felt the pressure of her touch, heat that grew from her grip like a dull ache.

Lora stared at her hand, then at me. The muscles in her cheeks seemed to spasm. “You have so much to be thankful for. Don’t you realize that?”

My pulse raced, but for once I refused to answer.

She pushed my arm away, but looked even more flustered now than before. “And you,” she spat, turning her attention to Alice, “you ask too many questions.”

Alice met her gaze and didn’t blink. “And get too few honest answers.”

CHAPTER 4

The hurricane shelter looked the same as it had the previous year—same heavy door, same thick walls. So did the grassy square beside it; and the water tower behind, which leaned precariously, defying gravity.

We pushed inside, and followed the staircase down. The shelter was a squat building, built mostly underground. Compared to low-lying Hatteras Island, where the waves almost kissed the cabin stilts at high tide, it felt extremely safe. Even the storm raging outside the narrow band of windows near the ceiling sounded distant. We were insulated from danger here.

I wished my father had come with us. In the heat of the moment I’d been confused, but now I realized that we could have made room for him in one of the canoes. Or would Griffin have already foreseen that? Perhaps there was no way to escape fate.

In the half-darkness we gathered in a circle and ate scraps of cured fish along with freshly harvested yucca flowers and sea rocket stems. I washed it down with small sips from my water canister. Despite the humidity I was thirsty, but I rationed my water. Unless the storm was devastating, the Guardians would arrive the next morning and tell us it was safe to return to the colony, and then I’d gulp down every last drop.

Griffin’s portion sat untouched beside him. I tried to get him to eat, but he didn’t seem to notice me. With his back pressed against the wall of the shelter, eyes blank and face drawn, he looked catatonic.

He wasn’t the only one not eating. “Are you all right, Dennis?” I asked.

The young boy shook his head.

“It’s the storm,” explained Rose. She ran her hand up and down his back. “He feels it.”

“Well, it is a bad one,” said Lora.

I listened to rain drumming against the shelter. All I could think about was my father, and whether he’d be alive by morning.

Lora watched me. “Everything will be fine. You must have faith in the Guardians.”

“Even when they’re wrong?” muttered Dennis.

All eyes turned to him. I’d heard Alice cross the Guardians, but never Dennis. He was usually so wary of speaking out of turn.

“It’s a storm, not a hurricane,” he continued. “It’s bad, but we could’ve stayed on Hatteras. We should’ve stayed.”

“Now, now, Dennis,” said Eleanor, no doubt trying to spare him Lora’s wrath. “There’s more to our element than predicting weather, remember. We need to consider the effects of the storm. How the wind might change the height of the ocean. How rain can erode the beach. How—”

“I’ve done all of that already.”

“Nonsense,” snapped Lora. “Your father has shown you basic skills, that’s all. You’ll learn to harness your full element once you’re an Apprentice, not a moment sooner.”

Dennis shook his head. “Too late. Eleanor’s already taught me everything.”

“How could she? Eleanor doesn’t even know everything—”

“She does! And so do I.” Dennis’s small dark eyes were wild. “I know the wind is thirty-three knots. We’ve already had an inch of rain, but we’ll only get two. The ocean will swell by eighteen inches, but it won’t rise above the cabin stilts. I know all of it. I’ve felt it all already.”

Now that his outburst was over, the focus shifted to Eleanor. As an Apprentice of the Wind, she needed to tell Dennis he was mistaken. She needed to restore order. But she turned away instead. Even in the half-light, she looked flushed.

I wondered if Lora would punish both of them. An Apprentice training a young one was unthinkable; surely his element was too raw. He should have been taught by his father, Kyte, just as Eleanor had been taught by her mother.

“You should enjoy being young, Dennis,” Lora said with eerie calm. “You have people who care for you. Food to eat. All we ask is that you listen and learn. There’s time enough for you to become an Apprentice, to take on that responsibility.” She summoned an unconvincing smile. “Or are you afraid there’ll be no storms left by the time you turn sixteen?”

Dennis folded his arms and jutted out his lower lip. “What’s the use of having an element if I’m not allowed to use it? Right now I’m no different than Thomas.”

Rose grasped his arm and shook it. “That’s a horrible thing to say. Tell him you’re sorry.”

“Why? It’s true. He doesn’t have an element.”

“Maybe there are more elements than we know,” said Ananias quickly. “After all, Griffin has the skill of foresight.”

Lora turned the full force of her glare onto Ananias. “That’s no skill. Predicting others’ misfortune is a curse.”

“You think we don’t know that?” I snapped. “Look at him. He can’t eat or sleep because of what he saw.”

“If he saw anything at all. Being right twice doesn’t make him a seer. Have you asked him what he saw today?”

“No. I’m not going to make him relive it, no matter what it was. And I won’t let anyone else, either.”

Dennis shivered. “Griffin frightens me. He hasn’t moved since we got here. What’s wrong with him?”

“Nothing’s wrong with him,” I said.

“How would you know? Our father says you’re strange. Says we should be careful around you. Anyway, why don’t you have an element?”

“Enough!” shouted Ananias.

Maybe I should have been offended, but I wasn’t. I’d asked the same question a hundred times, and never once had a satisfactory answer. I turned to Lora, wondering how she’d reply.

The old woman licked her dry lips. Her breaths were unusually quick. “I think you should go sit by yourself, young Dennis. You’ve said quite enough for one night.”

With a defiant glare, Dennis shuffled over to the far wall. I wasn’t angry with him, though.

“You can hardly expect him to learn if you won’t answer his questions,” I said.

“His question was impertinent. As is your tone.”

“My tone? My father may be dead, but you’re worried about my tone?”

Lora’s expression didn’t change. “I think maybe you should leave us too.”

“Nothing would make me happier.”

As Eleanor told a story to clear the air, I joined Dennis and Griffin in exile against the far wall. When I touched Griffin’s shoulder he flinched, but still didn’t open his eyes. His dark, curly hair was lank from sweat and his face was gaunt. We probably looked alike.

I opened my bag and pulled out one of the battered books my father had found in the remains of Skeleton Town. Pages were missing, but Griffin didn’t usually care—it was a chance to lose himself in a different world. This time, he wouldn’t take it.

I could think of only one other thing to try: a piece of driftwood and a burnt twig. Griffin was an extraordinary artist, the best in the colony. I placed the driftwood in his lap, the twig in his fingers, and waited.

Something seemed to stir in him, and Griffin brushed the twig across the wood, leaving shadowy black lines. Although I wasn’t sure what he was drawing, I could see him relaxing, his breathing slow. As Eleanor murmured her story, Griffin’s picture began to take shape: Guardian Lora asleep, an expression of peacefulness softening her sharp features. It was one of his finest—far more than Lora deserved. I wished he’d saved his talent for someone else.

When she was done telling her story, Eleanor came over and knelt beside Dennis. She glanced over her shoulder like she was making sure no one was listening. But then her eyes locked on me momentarily. I got the feeling she wanted me to hear.

“Are you sure about eighteen inches of swell?” she asked Dennis.

He nodded.

“Hmm. I thought twenty, but you’re probably right. You usually are. Your element is so much further along than mine was at your age. But try not to be in too much of a hurry, all right?”

She stroked his spiky hair and lowered her voice to a whisper. “Remember the first time you sensed a storm coming? You were only three, but you knew what was happening. I could tell just by looking at your face you had the element, same as me. And it’s only gotten stronger.” She swallowed. “But I know what you’re going through, remember? I know how it feels—the echo. All that fear and uncertainty.”

“How come no one else’s element has an echo?”

“They do. No one talks about it, but if you watch their faces, you’ll see—everybody suffers somehow.”

“Sometimes I can’t sleep. It’s like something’s pressing against my head.”

“I’m so sorry.” Eleanor took his hand and held it. “My father wouldn’t let me focus on my element until I was your age. I thought if I started things earlier, you’d hone your element quicker—maybe get control of the echo quicker too. But it’s worse now, isn’t it?”

He nodded again.

“Oh, Dennis. This is all my fault.” She sighed. “How long have you been feeling this storm?”

“Since last night. It’s so much worse over here, though.”

“I know. That’s why I hate coming to Roanoke Island. But it makes sense, I guess. We only come here when there’s a storm, and that’s when the echo is worst.” She stared at her fingers, splayed out across the hard stone floor. “Listen, you have to believe me—eventually the echo gets better. It did for me . . . like a weight being lifted, little by little. You’ll feel it too. And when you do, you won’t care about a title. Or even whether people listen to you. You’ll just love being able to relax again.”

She held him then, and let him cry into her hair, while we all pretended not to notice.

CHAPTER 5

Soon it was too dark to do anything. Ananias took one of the slow-burning candles the Guardians had discovered when they first explored Skeleton Town and lit it with a single spark from his fingertip. We placed blankets on the floor and settled down to sleep.

As the murmur of deep breathing filled the room, I wondered if I was the only one still awake. Then I heard Lora moaning beside me, the noise punctuated by occasional sharp breaths. I was still furious at her, so I blocked it out as long as I could. But there was something very uncomfortable about that sound.

“Are you all right?” I whispered.

Lora opened her mouth to speak, but nothing came out. Her tongue clicked, as though stuck to the roof of her mouth.

“Do you need water?”

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  • Posted November 24, 2012

    (Source: I received a digital copy of this book for free on a re

    (Source: I received a digital copy of this book for free on a read-to-review basis. Thanks to Penguin Young Readers Group and Netgalley.)
    16-year-old Thom is unique… in a bad way; the only person ever to have no ‘element’. Everyone else has a link to one of the elements – fire, earth, wind, or water. They can catch fish, predict storms, or start fires with their bare hands, but Thom can’t do anything, and everybody thinks that he is a ‘nothing’.

    During a storm, Thom, his brothers, and some of the other kids from the island where he lives head over to a hurricane shelter in an abandoned town on another island. Problem is that in the morning when the ‘Guardians’ – the older inhabitants of the island (their parents and siblings), should be coming to the hurricane shelter to collect them, they don’t arrive, and when the kids look over to the island where they live, there are huge plumes of smoke – their home is burning.

    When they row back to their home island to find out what has happened, the guardians are all missing, their homes are burned to the ground, and sailing just off the island is a pirate ship.

    When the pirates realise that the kids are back on the island, they come back in search of them. They believe they one of them is ‘the solution’ (a cure to the plague that has forced them to live in isolation). Now the kids must not only stop themselves from being taken by the pirates, but must also try to rescue their families.
    Who is ‘the solution’ though? What do they believe ‘the solution’ can really do? And is Thom really a nothing?


    This was a great story. There was plenty of mystery surrounding each of the kids and their abilities, and what the pirates wanted them for. I must say that it isn’t quite as scary as a lot of dystopian books that I have read – no zombies here, but it was still a great read.

    I liked the different abilities that each of the kids had, and how they were able to use them. I hated how poor Thom was made to feel like a ‘nothing’, and how the others treated him because they thought he had no element. He was totally made to feel like a second class citizen which was really unfair.

    There was a hint at romance, but no real romance storyline. There were 2 girls who both seemed to like Thom, but it never went any further than that.

    There wasn’t a lot of backstory to be had, but there was enough to set the scene, and give an idea of the sort of world where the story took place.

    There were also plenty of little twists in the story that I really appreciated; especially the one at the end! I totally didn’t expect the revelation at the end, but it makes me wonder if there may be a sequel to this book in the works?

    Overall; a great YA dystopian – not too scary, and no romance.
    7.5 out of 10.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    I just finished the book and it was wonderful. i cant wait for t

    I just finished the book and it was wonderful. i cant wait for the second book by antony john - FireBrand. This book gave great detail and wonderful scenes full of suspense and action. I could not stop reading this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 6, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    ¿Elemental¿ by, Antony John Thomas is a sixteen-year-old boy

    “Elemental” by, Antony John




    Thomas is a sixteen-year-old boy growing up on an island with a handfull of others who have survived a plague. The people in this colony all have special elemental powers, with the exception of Thomas who was born without one. When a group of pirates invade the island and take all the adults captive, Thomas and the other kids have to find a way to rescue them and save their home. 




    Elemental has a story and characters that will appeal to a wide range of readers. 
    *Thomas is a relatable character and the story is told from his perspective. I felt sorry for him and how isolated he was throughout the story. 
    *Alice and Rose are very different from one another but they both care for Thomas. The girls add great layers to this story and I liked them both very much. 
    *Griffin is Thomas’ little brother who doesn’t talk. He and Thomas use sign language to communicate and Griffin is one of Thomas’ only friends. 
    The adults don’t have a very big part in this story but I liked it that way. The focus is on the kids and how they are dealing with a situation that is not in their control. It is very interesting to see them cope and change as the story goes along. 
    Elemental is obviously the first in what will be a series and I am excited to see where the author takes these characters. 

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2012

    Exciting story!

    If you enjoyed the Percy Jackson series by Riordan or the Virals series by Reichs, check out this first of a new series by Antony John - you will love it!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 29, 2012

    Aang

    Talking to one of azula's friends are you?

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2014

    Dang it

    I am writing a series named Elemental and i searched the name out of curiosity. Turns out i will be sharing the tital with a lot of other authors...-______-

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 5, 2014

    A element that Jhony gave up

    He gave up the cloud element and got the lava element. So the cloud element is open.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2014

    Map

    Each result is labeled, so explore!

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  • Posted April 10, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    I liked it a lot

    So this was a little different of a book read for me but I still very much enjoyed it ¿¿ It was gripping and full of intrigue, revelation, mystery (like wow) and sunspace that I was not expecting... Like at all. Ok look the book started off slow as heck but it picked up and when it did... I was a LOT more entertained in the second have then the first Hehe anyway it's a good gripping science fiction survival story and an unexpectedly emotional story of survival and self-discovery if you like those kinds of things you would like this book. And I can't wait to read the next one ¿¿

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2013

    Leafy

    Name:Leafy Age:16 Gender:Female Eye color:One eye is green the other is Brown Appearence:Usally wears a leaf green dress and green sneakers. Has dark brown hair and us 5"2' tall. Wears a leaf pendent to symbolize life. Personality:Kind and Caring. Despises violence and lives animals. Element:Life Pet:A deer named Twig.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 25, 2013

    a good read.

    a good read.

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  • Posted January 20, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    I was all over the place with this one. There were some very suc

    I was all over the place with this one. There were some very successful things, some just successful, some so-so and some that just didn't work for me. It's all jumbled up with things I wish were included, somethings I wish weren't included and things I can’t be sure about.

    While I prefer the the character driven novel,but simply liking the main character and going for a roller coaster ride still works for me. Those books for are usually not great, but good personally. <i>Elemental</i>
    is one of those books. <i>Elemental</i>
    wasn’t character driven, but I still feel like I would’ve, could’ve, should’ve like it better, had some elements turned out differently. I hoped for more and it felt just out of reach, which is just so frustrating.

    In the end, I will say that it was a fast paced, action oriented enjoyable read, depending on what your preferences are. Not a recommend to everyone for reading book. It worked as the first book in a trilogy as a set up, a draw in and a story that feels complete holding its own. There’s no real cliff hanger but an open ending. I will be reading the next book for sure to find out what happens next but it’s not a burning need to read it.I’m looking forward to it though and I’m hoping the next book recovers, strengthens, and clarifies to meets the high expectations I had for the first book.

    Loved the concept, the cover, the premise, and the world. The characters were okay, only fell in love with two (and neither was the main character). There were some issues there and it was hard to connect/become attached to almost all of them. The pacing was fast and good but considering my other issues, I wish there was more of slowed down beginning. Maybe a foreword to set up what the colony and its people were like under normal/non-dramatic circumstances. I think that would've helped alleviate some problems, and form a better connection instead of instantly putting the book in constant action and upheaval. The beginning was hard to keep everyone and everything straight. I wish there was a reference in the back to help with this. It’s just hard to get a handle on who these characters are, their relationships, their dynamics and what their baseline is, when we get <i>told</i>
    things about them in the beginning and the rest of the book is spent changing everything. It felt so topsy-turvy. There really is <i> a lot </i>
    going on here, and it maybe just too much to push into one book.

    More Swiss Family Robinson than a dystopian feel for me. The only time it really felt like a dystopian is when Thom was trying to figure out everyday things from 'the before'. (Of course, not necessarily dystopian, aliens would have the same reaction.) The Plague talk is certainly dystopian but really it didn't land. Hearing about what happened should've packed a punch, but instead I felt like a neutral observer to another planet's problems. (Maybe I’m the alien here.) I think that comes from the kid's own lack of really grasping how far widespread and devastating this event was. I think (hope) this will be amped up with the next book, since this is the set up. Especially due to the ending, with it's reveal and subsequent questions, is so very dystopian. Otherwise, it was a paranormal magical powers group of people stranded on a island. Which isn't a bad thing, just not what I was expecting.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2012

    Healer Den

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2012

    Kits

    Firekit shoots fire from his paws, lighting up the landscape. Airkit weaves a tornado. Earthkit kicks rocks at the target. Waterkit slaps her target with water. All the kits are the four elements.

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2012

    May

    Yeah...

    0 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 6, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 6, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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