An Elementary Treatise on Electricity [NOOK Book]

Overview

James Clerk Maxwell (1831?1879), first Cavendish Professor of Physics at Cambridge, made major contributions to many areas of theoretical physics and mathematics, not least his discoveries in the fields of electromagnetism and of the kinetic theory of gases, which have been regarded as laying the foundations of all modern physics. This work of 1881 was edited from Maxwell's notes by a colleague, William Garnett, and had formed the basis of his lectures. Several of the articles included in the present work were ...
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An Elementary Treatise on Electricity

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Overview

James Clerk Maxwell (1831–1879), first Cavendish Professor of Physics at Cambridge, made major contributions to many areas of theoretical physics and mathematics, not least his discoveries in the fields of electromagnetism and of the kinetic theory of gases, which have been regarded as laying the foundations of all modern physics. This work of 1881 was edited from Maxwell's notes by a colleague, William Garnett, and had formed the basis of his lectures. Several of the articles included in the present work were also included in his two-volume Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism (1873), also reissued in this series. The preface indicates that the two works were aimed at somewhat different audiences, the larger work assuming a greater knowledge of higher mathematics. Maxwell had also modified some of his methodology, and hoped to encourage the reader to develop an understanding of concepts relating to electricity.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940023887920
  • Publisher: At the Clarendon press
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: Digitized from 1881 volume
  • File size: 449 KB

Meet the Author

James Clerk Maxwell: In His Own Words — And Others
Dover reprinted Maxwell's Treatise on Electricity and Magnetism in 1954, surely one of the first classics of scientific literature over a thousand pages in length to be given new life and accessibility to students and researchers as a result of the paperback revolution of the 1950s. Matter and Motion followed in 1991 and Theory of Heat in 2001.

Some towering figures in science have to speak for themselves. Such is James Clerk Maxwell (1813–1879), the Scottish physicist and mathematician who formulated the basic equations of classical electromagnetic theory.

In the Author's Own Words:
"We may find illustrations of the highest doctrines of science in games and gymnastics, in traveling by land and by water, in storms of the air and of the sea, and wherever there is matter in motion."

"The 2nd law of thermodynamics has the same degree of truth as the statement that if you throw a tumblerful of water into the sea, you cannot get the same tumblerful of water out again." — James Clerk Maxwell

Critical Acclaim for James Clerk Maxwell:
"From a long view of the history of mankind — seen from, say, ten thousand years from now — there can be little doubt that the most significant event of the 19th century will be judged as Maxwell's discovery of the laws of electrodynamics. The American Civil War will pale into provincial insignificance in comparison with this important scientific event of the same decade." — Richard P. Feynman

"Maxwell's equations have had a greater impact on human history than any ten presidents." — Carl Sagan

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Table of Contents

Editor's preface; Fragment of author's preface; 1. Experiment 1; 2. On the charges of electrified bodies; 3. On electrical work and energy; 4. The electric field; 5. Faraday's law of lines of induction; 6. Particular cases of electrification; 7. Electrical images; 8. Capacity; 9. Electric current; 10. Phenomena of an electric current which flows through heterogeneous media; 11. Methods of maintaining an electric current; 12. On the measurement of electric resistance; 13. On the electric resistance of substances.
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