The Elements of Deductive Logic: Designed Mainly for the Use of Junior Students in the Universities

The Elements of Deductive Logic: Designed Mainly for the Use of Junior Students in the Universities

by Thomas Fowler
     
 

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This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back… See more details below

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This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

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ISBN-13:
2940024279533
Publisher:
The Clarendon press
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
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0 MB

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CHAPTER V. Relation of the Predicate to the Subject of a Proposition (Heads of Predicablcs). N. B. For this Chapter, in the case of beginners, may be substituted Appendix, p. 155. See Preface, p. xiv. FROM what has already been said, it is plain that a singular, collective, or abstract term, inasmuch as it is always distributed, cannot form the subject of an I or O proposition: on a little reflection it will also be plain that the predicate of a proposition cannot be singular, collective, or abstract, unless the subject be the same. We have already noticed that an attributive can never form the subject of any proposition. These considerations will be found to simplify the problem before us. This problem may be stated thus : How may the predicates of propositions be classified in relation to their subjects? or What are the heads of predicables (prsedi- cabilia, things or words that may be predicated) ? We shall discuss the four forms of proposition in order. To commence with A, and with the special case where both subject and predicate are common terms, or abslract terms which are used as common terms1. Here (/jo. the predicate may either be equivalent in extent to the subject, or greater; it cannot be less. We can say, for instance, ' All men are animals,' or ' All men are rational animals,' but we cannot say ' All animals are men.' Now, if the predicate be equivalent in extent to the subject, it is either a Synonym, as ' A wold is a down'; or a Definition, as ' A triangle is a three-sided rectilineal figure'; or a combination of a genus (a term which will be immediately explained) with some attribute which is peculiar to the term in question (called by Aristotle an Kioc or' peculiarity'), as ' A triangle is a rectilineal figure the sum of whose angles is equal to ...

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