The Elements of Java Style

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Overview

The Elements of Java Style, written by renowned author Scott Ambler, Alan Vermeulen, and a team of programmers from Rogue Wave Software, is directed at anyone who writes Java code. Many books explain the syntax and basic use of Java; however, this essential guide explains not only what you can do with the syntax, but what you ought to do. Just as Strunk and White's The Elements of Style provides rules of usage for the English language, this text furnishes a set of rules for Java practitioners. While illustrating these rules with parallel examples of correct and incorrect usage, the authors offer a collection of standards, conventions, and guidelines for writing solid Java code that will be easy to understand, maintain, and enhance. Java developers and programmers who read this book will write better Java code, and become more productive as well. Indeed, anyone who writes Java code or plans to learn how to write Java code should have this book next to his/her computer.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"This is a great book for the beginner or intermediate developer — experts should already know this stuff. It will help you create better, cleaner, more easily maintained code. If you work with other developers, I recommend getting several copies for the group...The Elements of Java Style proves that 'Good things come in small packages.' Physically, it's a small book, and weighs in at just 142 pages. However, the positive impact it can have on your work is all out of proportion to its size. That's because the ideas presented aren't limited to a single language, and the way the ideas are presented is very compact. The Elements of Java Style isn't about the code you write, it's about the way you write. Its central premise is that your writing style either enhances or decreases the readability and understandability of the code you write...Over the years, I've read lots of books that I would recommend to different developers, but this book is one of a few that I would recommend to all developers. Pick up a copy, give it a read, and I think you'll agree."
Javalobby

"The Elements of Java Style is a useful resource for those wishing to refine their skills in the language and apply them in a team environment."
Science Books & Films

"By and large there is little to argue about. The Elements of Java Style is perfect in what it tries to achieve."
The Development Exchange's Java Zone

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780521777681
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication date: 11/30/1999
  • Series: Advances in Object Technology Series , #15
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 146
  • Sales rank: 1,426,649
  • Product dimensions: 6.97 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 0.31 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface; Introduction; 1. General principles; 2. Formatting conventions; 3. Naming conventions; 4. Documentation conventions; 5. Programming conventions; 6. Packaging conventions; Summary; Glossary; Bibliography; Index.

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Introduction

The syntax of a programming language tells you what code it is possible to write-what the machine will understand. Style tells you what you ought to write-what the humans reading the code will understand. Code written with a consistent, simple style will be maintainable, robust, and contain fewer bugs. Code written with no regard to style will contain more bugs. It may simply be thrown away and rewritten rather than maintained.

Our two favorite style guides are classics: and Kernighan and Plauger's The Elements of Programming Style. These small books work because they are simple-a list of rules, 'each containing a brief explanation and examples of correct, and sometimes incorrect, use. We followed the same pattern in this book.

This simple treatment-a series of rules-enabled us to keep this book short and easy to understand. The idea is to provide a clear standard to follow, so programmers can spend their time on solving the problems of their customers, instead of worrying about naming conventions and formatting.

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2003

    Excellent Book

    All developer should have this book as reference. It is an excellent reference. Programmer coming from 3GL programming often follow the same 3GL coding standard, which by OO standard not a good practice. This book will guide you to write organized code in tune with Java standards.

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