Elements of Logic / Edition 5

Elements of Logic / Edition 5

by Stephen Francis Barker
     
 

ISBN-10: 0070037302

ISBN-13: 9780070037304

Pub. Date: 12/01/1988

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Higher Education

This introductory logic text is designed for courses that cover both formal and informal logic. Many exercises have been revised,as have the sections on informal logic. The text covers a broad,traditional range of topics and includes a large number of exercises with concisely and pointedly illustrated logical principles. Answers to selected exercises are included

Overview

This introductory logic text is designed for courses that cover both formal and informal logic. Many exercises have been revised,as have the sections on informal logic. The text covers a broad,traditional range of topics and includes a large number of exercises with concisely and pointedly illustrated logical principles. Answers to selected exercises are included in the study guide. This edition includes new material on the logic of identity,the use of logic in writing,and the status of logic laws—plus many more exercises.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780070037304
Publisher:
McGraw-Hill Higher Education
Publication date:
12/01/1988
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
291
Product dimensions:
6.60(w) x 9.55(h) x 0.63(d)

Table of Contents

Preface xi
Note xv
Introduction
1(24)
Logic and Arguments
1(11)
Exercise 1
9(3)
Deduction and Validity
12(6)
Exercise 2
16(2)
Empirical and Necessary Sentences
18(7)
Exercise 3
22(3)
The Logic of Categorical Sentences
25(39)
Categorical Sentences
25(6)
Exercise 4
30(1)
The Square of Opposition
31(5)
Exercise 5
35(1)
Operations on Categorical Sentences
36(8)
Exercise 6
42(2)
The Syllogism
44(7)
Exercise 7
50(1)
Rules of the Syllogism
51(3)
Exercise 8
53(1)
Translating into Standard Form
54(6)
Exercise 9
58(2)
Related Types of Argument
60(4)
Exercise 10
61(3)
The Logic of Truth Functions
64(46)
Arguments Containing Compound Sentences
64(8)
Exercise 11
71(1)
Translating into Standard Form; Dilemmas
72(5)
Exercise 12
76(1)
Truth Functions and Their Grouping
77(9)
Exercise 13
83(3)
Truth Tables
86(8)
Exercise 14
92(2)
Formal Deductions
94(6)
Exercise 15
98(2)
The Indirect Method; Showing Invalidity
100(4)
Exercise 16
102(2)
Logic and Computers
104(6)
Exercise 17
108(2)
Monadic Quantification
110(25)
The Symbolism of Quantification
110(6)
Exercise 18
110(6)
Symbolizing Categorical Sentences
116(5)
Exercise 19
119(2)
Proving the Validity of Arguments
121(7)
Exercise 20
126(2)
Using the Method
128(3)
Exercise 21
130(1)
Extending the Method
131(4)
Exercise 22
134(1)
General Quantification
135(19)
Symbolizing with Multiple Variables
135(5)
Exercise 23
138(2)
Deductions Again
140(5)
Exercise 24
143(2)
Negative Demonstrations
145(4)
Exercise 25
147(2)
Identity and its Laws
149(5)
Exercise 26
152(2)
Fallacies
154(27)
Inconsistency, Petitio, and the Pure Non Sequitur
154(9)
Exercise 27
161(2)
Fallacies of Ambiguity and Irrelevance
163(9)
Exercise 28
169(3)
Avoiding Ambiguity; Definitions
172(9)
Exercise 29
177(4)
Inductive Reasoning
181(37)
Induction and Probability
181(5)
Exercise 30
185(1)
Inductive Generalization
186(5)
Exercise 31
190(1)
Inductive Analogy
191(4)
Exercise 32
193(2)
Hypotheses about Causes
195(5)
Exercise 33
199(1)
Numerical Probabilities
200(9)
Exercise 34
207(2)
Explanatory Hypotheses
209(9)
Exercise 35
215(3)
Applying Logical Principles
218(17)
Choosing the Right Deductive Form
218(3)
Exercise 36
220(1)
The Enthymeme
221(4)
Exercise 37
224(1)
Noninductive Reasoning by Analogy
225(4)
Exercise 38
228(1)
Reasoning in Writing
229(6)
Exercise 39
232(3)
Philosophical Issues
235(20)
The Status of Logical Laws
235(8)
Exercise 40
242(1)
Skepticism about Deduction and Induction
243(6)
Exercise 41
249(1)
The Ethics of Belief
249(6)
Exercise 42
253(2)
Glossary of Terms 255(11)
Glossary of Symbols 266(2)
Notes 268(17)
Index 285

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