The Elephant and the Dragon: The Rise of India and China and What It Means for All of Us

The Elephant and the Dragon: The Rise of India and China and What It Means for All of Us

3.4 7
by Robyn Meredith
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0393331938

ISBN-13: 9780393331936

Pub. Date: 06/28/2008

Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.


About the Author:
Robyn Meredith is a foreign correspondent for Forbes magazine who writes about India and China

Overview


About the Author:
Robyn Meredith is a foreign correspondent for Forbes magazine who writes about India and China

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393331936
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
06/28/2008
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
272
Sales rank:
1,356,602
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.10(h) x 0.90(d)

Table of Contents


Introduction: Tectonic Economics     9
Where Mao Meets the Middle Class     15
From the Spinning Wheel to the Fiber-Optic Wire     38
Made by America in China     58
The Internet's Spice Route     76
The Disassembly Line     97
India's Cultural Revolution     117
Revolution by Dinner Party     138
Geopolitics Mixed with Oil and Water     159
A Catalyst for Competitiveness     188
Afterword     214
Acknowledgments     217
Notes     219
Index     237

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The Elephant and the Dragon: The Rise of India and China and What It Means for All of Us 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Brien_Convery More than 1 year ago
The IBM Competitive Edge Book Club, open to all Sales, Marketing, and Communication professionals at IBM, voted and selected "The Elephant and The Dragon" as the Q3 2009 book selection. Overall feedback from the members was great. In the feedback from the members, we ask them the question - "What will you do differently in your job since your study of this book?" Some of the replies directly from the members included: - "This book gave me great insight into how to position and sell IBM's capabilities to utilize global resources. Robyn's knowledge of India and China really made an impact." - "This book provided some additional understanding into the economic and cultural status in both countries, which will be helpful in determining future strategies in them." - "Having a greater understanding of the two cultures will alter my behavior when dealing with people from India and China." - "Approach growth markets with keener business acumen." - "One comment made by the author has stuck with me since this call, and reminds me to think more carefully about how & why people react to situations, both at work and at home. The quote from the author was 'where you stand depends on where you sit' Very relevant!" Thank you Robyn Meredith for being apart of the IBM Competitive Edge Book Club experience and for bringing "light" to the transformation of China and India that is refreshing, understandable, comprehensive, and timely. Best Regards, Brien Convery IBM Global Workforce Partner and Competitive Edge Book Club Leader
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Good journalistic presentation on a hot topic. Full of concrete observations based on some personal experience. On the issue side, it is somewhat weak, though it is still a good read.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Robyn Meredith is an excellent observer on the changes taking place in China and India. However, her opinion that this will not affect American economy is short sighted. The book is recommended so that readers will understand what is happening in the globalization and draw their own conclusion about the long term trends and how it would affect them and their children and whether they should send their children to study computer science and engineering since those jobs will be in India and China. For example, the undergraduate enrollment for engineering in USA is down while we are importing engineering talents from abroad. Long term trend is , we are losing our engineering talents that would produce high value products for export. When engineers are in short supply, who will design and build roads, bridges, cars, and all the high tech products? On the otherhand, everyone is recommending we should send our kids to study face time jobs like lawyers, policeman, nurses etc. There will be no one to fix the technology that we would import.