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Elephant Rescue: Changing the Future for Endangered Wildlife

Overview

From the book:
"I just want to make sure there are elephants around for generations to enjoy, like I have."

In 1979, the African elephant population was 1.3 million. By 1989 that total dropped dramatically to 609,000. During the 1980s, poachers killed some three hundred elephants a day. Although active measures were soon enforced to protect African and Asian elephant populations, the elephant's future is still...

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Overview

From the book:
"I just want to make sure there are elephants around for generations to enjoy, like I have."

In 1979, the African elephant population was 1.3 million. By 1989 that total dropped dramatically to 609,000. During the 1980s, poachers killed some three hundred elephants a day. Although active measures were soon enforced to protect African and Asian elephant populations, the elephant's future is still uncertain.

Elephant Rescue traces the efforts of individuals and organizations that confront the international ivory trade and lobby indigenous governments to create protective environments. One innovative program described is green hunting. Sport hunters who once shot and killed elephants are now given the opportunity to use tranquilizers. The animal suffers no harm and accompanying researchers can fit these elephants with a radio collar for further studies.

The book also covers:

  • How elephants live
  • Ways elephants protect their families
  • Elephants' astonishingly intricate behavior
  • Physiology, life span, diet and more.

Elephant Rescue is a fascinating book about how people and elephants can thrive in a shared environment.

About the Firefly Animal Rescue series:

The Firefly Animal Rescue identifies endangered and threatened species and what is being done to protect them. Combining lively, accessible text and stunning color photographs, each book provides a detailed overview of the species, describing its characteristics, behavior, habits, physiology and more.

"These attractive books are a call to action... fascinating readable accounts."
- School Library Journal

"Succinct introductions to the science and practice of wildlife conservation... written in accessible, lively language."
- Booklist

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Editorial Reviews

Green Teacher - Debra Bridgman
Award winning... With beautiful photography and inspiring examples of individuals passionately devoted to wildlife conservation, these are excellent resource for the classroom or school library.
Library Media Connection - Ruie Chehak
[review of series:] Anyone interested in learning more about endangered animals will find these books fascinating... This series will make a strong addition to any school library.
Resource Links - Maria Forte
Exceptionally packaged with wonderful color photographs and supplemental information.
Halifax Chronicle Herald - Deborah Wiles
Chapters devoted to facts about elephants are interspersed with chapters about dedicated individuals and groups... Written with a straightforward, no-nonsense approach... an invaluable resource.
Canadian Materials - Gillian Richardson
With its up-to-date data complimented by color photographs, this book will go a long way to educating young readers, as well as adults, about the fate of one of the world's most intelligent and fascinating creatures.
Science Books and Films
Chosen as one of the "Best Books for Junior High and Young Adult 2005" by Science Books and Films.
Science Books and Films - Willima H. Adams
This book is an excellent source of information about an endangered species.
Booklist - Hazel Rochman
With beautifully reproduced color photos, many of them full-page, and a clear, direct text, this spaciously designed photo-essay in the Firefly Animal Rescue series combines an urgent message about conservation with a close-up view of elephant physiology, behavior, and habitat in Africa and Asia.
Brandon Sun
Useful and informative... tells the story of these magnificent animals and their fight to remain viable in a world that constantly encroaches on their environment.
Halifax Chronicle Herald - Deborah Wiles
Chapters devoted to facts about elephants are interspersed with chapters about dedicated individuals and groups... Written with a straightforward, no-nonsense approach... an invaluable resource.
Children's Literature
Did you know the elephant defines itself by intelligence, personality, elaborate social life, caring for the young and an elaborate grieving process? Elephants are one of the few species that can transform their habitat, and this change often benefits other animals. For example, as an elephant moves around its habitat it drops dung which plants seeds that quickly germinate and grow into new food sources. Readers will learn these facts and others as they read this nonfiction text, part of the "Changing the Future for Endangered Wildlife" series. The book will enlighten readers about the connection between an elephant's environment and their survival as a species. The book includes beautiful photography, easy to read sections with excellent supporting text from various sources, and a listing of organizations that are protecting the elephant. The book is a perfect choice for an eighth or ninth grade science classroom or library. 2004, Firefly Books, Ages 12 to 15.
—Mindy Hardwick
School Library Journal
Gr 5 Up-These well-written titles introduce endangered or threatened species, describe how and why they are in danger, and explain what efforts are being made to protect them. In each book, a time line of conservation efforts with regard to the creatures' environments, research, and the law is included. Illustrated fast-fact sections provide information on name, size, life span, reproduction, diet, and more. Stunning, full-color photographs bring each species to life and depict a number of individuals in the field and laboratory working to save these animals. Each book also examines what the future looks like (bleak), and includes information on "How You Can Help." This last section lists contact information for conservation clubs and organizations. Each book includes an excellent index. These attractive titles are a call to action.-Cynde Suite, Bartow County Library System, Adairsville, GA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781552975954
  • Publisher: Firefly Books, Limited
  • Publication date: 9/1/2004
  • Series: Firefly Animal Rescue Series
  • Pages: 64
  • Age range: 10 - 13 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.25 (d)

Meet the Author

Jody Morgan is a biologist, writer and editor. Her work appears in many magazines including Harrowsmith and Equinox. She was the project editor for the book Mammals of North America.

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Read an Excerpt

The Gentle Giant

If the tiger is the spirit of the jungle," says researcher Raman Sukumar, "the elephant is its body -- large, majestic, making its presence felt with authority."

In some cultures, the elephant is treated as royalty or worshipped as a god. Yet through the centuries people have hunted them for their meat and ivory, harnessed them to pull logs out of the forest, even forced them to fight in wars. Growing human populations have destroyed most of the animal's territory and continue to compete for what's left.

Weighing up to 15,000 pounds (6,800 kg) and standing as tall as 13 feet (4 m), elephants are the largest of the land mammals. They are members of a group called Proboscidea, named for their most distinguishing feature: the proboscis, or trunk. Millions of years ago, over 350 species roamed every continent except Antarctica and Australia. The sole survivors are the African elephants (Loxodonta africana and Loxodonta cyclotis) and the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus). Strangely, their closest relative is the hyrax, a small, tailless mammal that looks like an overgrown guinea pig. They're also related to sea cows (manatees and dugongs) and aardvarks.

In 1979, there were some 1.3 million elephants in Africa. By 1989, only 609,000 remained. That year, the world agreed to a total ban on the ivory trade, but the most recent tally suggests that their numbers have still not recovered, and may even be declining. The number of wild Asian elephants has also dropped dramatically in the past 50 years; only 36,000 to 44,000 remain in the wild.

Today, devoted conservationists and scientists are working to find new ways for people and elephants tolive together.

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Table of Contents

The gentle giant
What big brains you have
Where do elephants live?
The story so far
Tusk tusk
White gold
Herd mentality
AT WORK: Iain Douglas-Hamilton
ON THE FRONTLINES: Green hunting
ON THE FRONTLINES: Amboseli Elephant Research Project
AT WORK: Joyce Poole
Have trunk, will travel
Trampled underfoot
ON THE FRONTLINES: Peace parks
You are what you eat
Make yourself at home
ON THE FRONTLINES: Elephant collaring
AT WORK: Raman Sukumar
Sounds like a herd of elephants
ON THE FRONTLINES: Elephant Listening Project
AT WORK: Katy Payne
Should elephants be kept in zoos?
AT WORK: Charlie Gray
ON THE FRONTLINES: David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust
What is the elephant's future?
Fast facts
How you can help
Index
Photo credits
Author's note

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First Chapter

The Gentle Giant

If the tiger is the spirit of the jungle," says researcher Raman Sukumar, "the elephant is its body — large, majestic, making its presence felt with authority."

In some cultures, the elephant is treated as royalty or worshipped as a god. Yet through the centuries people have hunted them for their meat and ivory, harnessed them to pull logs out of the forest, even forced them to fight in wars. Growing human populations have destroyed most of the animal's territory and continue to compete for what's left.

Weighing up to 15,000 pounds (6,800 kg) and standing as tall as 13 feet (4 m), elephants are the largest of the land mammals. They are members of a group called Proboscidea, named for their most distinguishing feature: the proboscis, or trunk. Millions of years ago, over 350 species roamed every continent except Antarctica and Australia. The sole survivors are the African elephants (Loxodonta africana and Loxodonta cyclotis) and the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus). Strangely, their closest relative is the hyrax, a small, tailless mammal that looks like an overgrown guinea pig. They're also related to sea cows (manatees and dugongs) and aardvarks.

In 1979, there were some 1.3 million elephants in Africa. By 1989, only 609,000 remained. That year, the world agreed to a total ban on the ivory trade, but the most recent tally suggests that their numbers have still not recovered, and may even be declining. The number of wild Asian elephants has also dropped dramatically in the past 50 years; only 36,000 to 44,000 remain in the wild.

Today, devoted conservationists and scientists are working to find new ways for people and elephants to live together.

Read More Show Less

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