Elephant

Elephant

1.0 1
by Steve Bloom
     
 

Best-selling photographer Steve Bloom follows up his wildly successful book Untamed with a tribute to the largest land mammals on earth. Twelve years in the making, this joyous celebration features elephants from the wildest reaches of Botswana to the teeming cities of India. With aerial shots of the herds in motion, dramatic interactions between angry males

…  See more details below

Overview

Best-selling photographer Steve Bloom follows up his wildly successful book Untamed with a tribute to the largest land mammals on earth. Twelve years in the making, this joyous celebration features elephants from the wildest reaches of Botswana to the teeming cities of India. With aerial shots of the herds in motion, dramatic interactions between angry males, and tender moments between mothers and their calves, this collection features an intimate look at these animals who, though seemingly as distinct from humans as a creature could be, share surprisingly similar characteristics: They have family structures like our own, they show loyalty and allegiance to those closest to them, they grieve as well as express joy, andas these photographs showthey have strongly individual personalities. Outdoor Photography magazine called Steve Blooms photos, "the best case yet for the defense of the earth." See for yourself why these creaturesonce found in nearly fifty countries and now on the endangered species listare, according to Bloom himself, "the true kings of the jungle."

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780811857277
Publisher:
Chronicle Books LLC
Publication date:
12/28/2006
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
9.87(w) x 12.87(h) x 1.12(d)

Meet the Author

Steve Bloom was born in South Africa and presently lives in England. Since 1999 his three book projects have all had first print runs of over 100,000 copies and have been published in 15 languages.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Elephant 1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I would highly recommend this book if it was entitled: 'Elephants in Computer Art'. If the author /publishers had taken this approach and presented the original image (or images) which yielded the final picture and produced them thumb nail fashion next to the caption pictures, the book would be the ultimate guide as to the potential of photo enhancement/manipulation soft ware. It would be a real eye opener to the reader who still believes 'that the camera does not lie'. Some of the images would have to be classified as great if one could be absolutely sure that they are not a product of Adobe software. The cover illustrated above shows a supposedly charging elephant. The tip of the ivory and eyes are all nicely in focus. Something which does not happen in reality. The tusk on the left looks like it belongs to another elephant and the eye pupils (which can be seen in the actual cover) look into different directions (there are not many cross eyed elephants out there and of course the dust is a dramatic addition. This sets the trend for the rest. If you are into photography software and its application this is a book for you. If you are looking for a true representation of the status of the elephant on the African and Asian continent keep looking. This book reminds me of another such title presenting 'beautiful nature' images, which another reviewer compared to doing a book on the wild flowers of Auschwitz while the Holocust was going on. There is another ethical question concerning the shots of swimming elephants. Should they be sent into sea water to do some swimming for photographers wanting underwater shots which now seems to happen regularly from Phuket to the Andaman Islands. Pretty much all the habitats in which Steve Bloom illustrates his elephants experience serious ecological problems. As far as human/wildlife conflicts the elephant is more affected then any other species. Elephants are today poached not just for ivory but increasingly for their meat and to keep them out of cultivated areas. This is another one of the realities this book does not deal with. As such I think I would like to change my mind and the title should not be: 'Elephants in Computer Art' but 'Elephants in Fairyland'.