Elephant, the Tiger, and the Cell Phone: Reflections on India, the Emerging 21st-Century Power

Elephant, the Tiger, and the Cell Phone: Reflections on India, the Emerging 21st-Century Power

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by Shashi Tharoor
     
 

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In his critically acclaimed previous work, India: From Midnight to the Millennium and Beyond, Shashi Tharoor, one of India's most respected writers and diplomats, traced the country's history from late colonial times through its first fifty years of independence. Interest in the subcontinent has never been greater, and this new work offers precious insights into

Overview

In his critically acclaimed previous work, India: From Midnight to the Millennium and Beyond, Shashi Tharoor, one of India's most respected writers and diplomats, traced the country's history from late colonial times through its first fifty years of independence. Interest in the subcontinent has never been greater, and this new work offers precious insights into this complex, multifaceted land, which despite its dazzling diversity of languages, customs, and cultures remains more than sixty years after its founding the world's largest democracy.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781559708944
Publisher:
Arcade Publishing
Publication date:
10/15/2008
Pages:
498
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.20(d)

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Elephant, The Tiger, And the Cell Phone: Reflections on India - the Emerging 21st-Century Power 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
B n N kindly offer more books on india..update pax indica by tharoor and india after gandhi by ramachandra guha..apologies if the post is irrelevant for the context but i am ignorant to communicate u through my new device in the right forum..also kindly suggest more books like discovery of india etc
KeikoHP More than 1 year ago
I liked this book well enough, though the author is an inveterate India-booster. (But hey, I like India too). There are just three main defects of this book, the first and most important one of which is that it requires a fair amount of background knowledge on the part of the reader. I failed almost completely to understand the parts about cricket, unfortunately, and these comprise a not insignificant part of the book. Second, as said before, one of the book's main purposes seems to be to say how great India is. This gets a little tiring after awhile. Third, and also fairly unproblematic for me, was that Mr. Tharoor seems a bit conceited. He refers to his own works time after time, which of course is not necessarily bad, but he seems to regard them as models for everyone to follow. I could be wrong, of course, and if I am, I apologize abjectly to him. But as I tried to say earlier, these last two things shouldn't be much of a problem for the reader. Anyone with a reasonable amount of previous knowledge of India will enjoy this book.