Elgelbert Joins the Circus

Elgelbert Joins the Circus

by Tom Paxton, Steven Kellogg
     
 

Engelbert the Elephant's encore performance!

Engelbert has a knack for causing a commotion wherever he goes, and his visit to the circus is no exception: This time, he stumbles into the spotlight and thrills the audience with a spectacular juggling extravaganza that will leave readers cheering! From flamboyant animals and acrobats to clowns and cotton candy,

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Overview

Engelbert the Elephant's encore performance!

Engelbert has a knack for causing a commotion wherever he goes, and his visit to the circus is no exception: This time, he stumbles into the spotlight and thrills the audience with a spectacular juggling extravaganza that will leave readers cheering! From flamboyant animals and acrobats to clowns and cotton candy, Engelbert's latest adventure delivers everything children love about the world under the big top. Written in high-spirited verse, here is the perfect read-aloud for the circus season.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Cahners\\Publishers_Weekly
This lackluster sequel to Engelbert the Elephant is just not up to Paxton's usual jaunty standards. The plot, about how Engelbert steals the show while visiting his cousin Edgar, a circus performer, is relayed through verse that's often strained and sometimes downright awkward ("So Engelbert set sail-/ The vessel rocked from side to side./ Poor Engelbert! The ocean seemed/ A million miles wide!"). Comparisons will inevitably be drawn between Wilson's (Brer Tiger and the Big Wind) egg-tempera paintings and Steven Kellogg's more successful artwork for the original book. While skillfully executed, Wilson's illustrations, with their soft palette and subdued style, tone down the action; they don't deliver the jolt of energy that might have helped jump-start this bland book.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This lackluster sequel to Engelbert the Elephant is just not up to Paxton's usual jaunty standards. The plot, about how Engelbert steals the show while visiting his cousin Edgar, a circus performer, is relayed through verse that's often strained and sometimes downright awkward ("So Engelbert set sail-/ The vessel rocked from side to side./ Poor Engelbert! The ocean seemed/ A million miles wide!"). Comparisons will inevitably be drawn between Wilson's (Brer Tiger and the Big Wind) egg-tempera paintings and Steven Kellogg's more successful artwork for the original book. While skillfully executed, Wilson's illustrations, with their soft palette and subdued style, tone down the action; they don't deliver the jolt of energy that might have helped jump-start this bland book. Ages 5-up. (Mar.)
Children's Literature - Carolyn Mott Ford
Children love stories about the circus and here is one with a happy twist. Engelbert the elephant travels from the jungle to America to visit Cousin Edgar. While searching for his cousin, Engelbert gets caught in the center ring and manages an impromptu juggling act. He unexpectedly becomes a star performer in the circus and enjoys his week in the spotlight. Cousin Edgar begs him to stay. Engelbert must leave because he had promised his old friends he would return to the jungle, but as he leaves he promises his new friends that he will come back to the circus to perform his fabulous juggling act once again.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1Engelbert the elephant is back for a big-top adventure. Upon receiving an invitation from Cousin Edgar, he leaves the jungle to visit America. Edgar works in a circus that employs music-playing animals, clowns, and a trapeze artist. When Engelbert arrives, he accidentally ends up in the main-event arena. His impromptu dancing and juggling steal the show, and he becomes the darling of the circus. The elephant agrees to stay and perform, for "an extra week or so" but finally must go home, with a promise that he will return. The story is told in rhyme, with meter that is occasionally forced, but reads aloud well. The egg-tempera illustrations are vibrant and fit the circus atmosphere. Children will enjoy looking for Engelbert's companion mice and their antics. Although neither text nor illustrations are as exuberant as in Engelbert the Elephant (Morrow, 1990), fans of the dancing pachyderm will want to read this happy tale.Angela J. Reynolds, West Slope Community Library, Washington Co., OR

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688099886
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
03/28/1997
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.85(w) x 11.40(h) x 0.37(d)
Age Range:
5 - 7 Years

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