Elizabeth I, CEO: Strategic Lessons from the Leader Who Built an Empire

Elizabeth I, CEO: Strategic Lessons from the Leader Who Built an Empire

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by Alan Axelrod
     
 

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Few leadership titles have been written on the lives of women. Alan Axelrod, noted historian and business management expert, reveals how Elizabeth I overcame daunting obstacles to win intense loyalty and lead England to greatness.

The queen's long reign offers lessons on: developing a leadership attitude and image enhanced by personal dynamism; becoming an… See more details below

Overview

Few leadership titles have been written on the lives of women. Alan Axelrod, noted historian and business management expert, reveals how Elizabeth I overcame daunting obstacles to win intense loyalty and lead England to greatness.

The queen's long reign offers lessons on: developing a leadership attitude and image enhanced by personal dynamism; becoming an effective coach and mentor skilled at nurturing creativity; manipulating others--subtly and ethically--and knowing and anticipating the "enemy."

How did Elizabeth meet the challenges that faced her, managing not only to stay alive and keep her imperiled nation afloat, but also to win the intense loyalty of her people and lead England to greatness? Historians and biographers have offered many explanations. Elizabeth I, CEO takes a fresh view, exploring issues that are relevant to leaders--especially business leaders--of today.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Editorial Reviews

CNNfn.com
...worth reading and provides some real insights.
Alan Caruba
You will find this a fascinating book for the ten leadership lessons the author conveys, based on her {Elizabeth's} life. —Bookviews
BookPage
Elizabeth I was a most remarkable woman and a fitting leadership model even today, as Axelrod makes abundantly clear in this fresh and readable new appraisal of her life.
Hardware Merchandiser
If you are a history buff, you will be a little disappointed by this book's simplicity, but curiously satisfied by the unique way Axelrod offers up the character of arguably the most influential woman in the Western world.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Who could possibly offer better leadership lessons than one of the most powerful women in history? Axelrod (Patton on Leadership, etc.) details more than 100 leadership principles based on Queen Elizabeth's style of statesmanship. Having assumed the throne during a time of economic and religious turmoil, she helped rebuild England and strengthen its position in the world during her four decades as queen. Some of the lessons drawn from her reign are simplistic and obvious, such as "Knowledge Really Is Power," based on the queen's voracious appetite for reading and her study of Greek and Latin. "Keep a Clear Head and an Even Keel" derives from the monarch's ability to hold her temper; during difficult negotiations, she would occasionally leave the room to walk outside. Other lessons deserve more attention from today's executives, such as "Make a Spectacle of Yourself": Axelrod avers that a leader must motivate employees with more than the bottom line, and that theatrical gestures can be an effective source of inspiration. In a similar vein, Axelrod exhorts, "Be a Great Communicator": "An effective leader thinks about what he says, carefully crafting each utterance of any significance." While history fans will enjoy the brief portraits of Queen Elizabeth's governing style in various circumstances, those seeking penetrating management insights may be disappointed that not every lesson applies equally to today's corporate leaders. $200,000 ad/promo; 3-city tour; 20-city radio satellite tour. (Sept.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Children's Literature
When Elizabeth became Queen in 1558, England was an impoverished nation, plagued with political strife. By the time her reign ended in 1603, England had become the richest and most powerful nation in Europe. This book details the remarkable leadership skills which made that transition possible. While receiving a clear and concise refresher course about Elizabethan England, readers examine Elizabeth as supervisor, imagemaker, communicator, and woman of principle. Quoting Elizabeth's actual words in letters and speeches, Axelrod illustrates her genius and translates it into useful strategies for modern success. "Kill rumors, not people," "earn the trust of those you lead," and "avoid impulse" are only three of more than one hundred lessons drawn from Elizabeth's example. Although the target audience for this book is career executives, managers, and supervisors, high school students might also find considerable relevance. This book would be an outstanding vehicle for history teachers to illustrate useful ways in which historical applications are pertinent to present day success, while also introducing students to valuable lessons in leadership and life. Though beneficial to both genders, it should be especially inspirational to young women. 2000, Prentice Hall, Ages 14 up, $23.00. Reviewer: Betty Hicks

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781101659496
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
05/01/2002
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
635,320
File size:
0 MB
Age Range:
18 Years

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