Elizabethan Fictions (Oxford English Monographs Series): Espionage, Counter-Espionage and the Duplicity of Fiction in Early Elizabethan Prose Narratives

Elizabethan Fictions (Oxford English Monographs Series): Espionage, Counter-Espionage and the Duplicity of Fiction in Early Elizabethan Prose Narratives

by R. W. Maslen
     
 


Elizabethan Fictions is a study of the works of John Lyly, George Gascoigne, Geoffrey Fenton, William Baldwin, and a number of other English writers in the context of changing attitudes to fiction in Elizabethan England. Both the censors and the writers of the time were aware that the developments in Elizabethan prose threatened to transform the nature ofSee more details below

Overview


Elizabethan Fictions is a study of the works of John Lyly, George Gascoigne, Geoffrey Fenton, William Baldwin, and a number of other English writers in the context of changing attitudes to fiction in Elizabethan England. Both the censors and the writers of the time were aware that the developments in Elizabethan prose threatened to transform the nature of fiction itself, and it was felt that these destructive capabilities might constitute a material threat to the security of the Elizabethan state. Maslen explores their violations of current conventions, their mockery of contemporary platitudes, their self-conscious stylishness, and their subtlety, and makes the case for these fictions to be seen as the precursors of Shakespeare's comedies, Sidney's prose epics, and the satires of Marlowe and Nashe.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780198119913
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
10/28/1997
Series:
Oxford English Monographs Series
Pages:
328
Product dimensions:
5.70(w) x 8.60(h) x 1.00(d)

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University of Glasgow

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Table of Contents

Introduction: Monstrous Imaginations
1. The Fiction of Simplicity in the Sixteenth-Century Treatise
2. Fictions and their Commentaries before 1570
3. George Gascoigne and the Fiction of Failure
4. George Pettie, Gender, and the Generation Gap
5. The Dissolution of Euphues
6. The Resolution of Euphues
Conclusion: Hideous Progeny
Bibliography

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