Ellipse [Deluxe Edition]

Ellipse [Deluxe Edition]

4.6 8
by Imogen Heap
     
 

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It took seven years for Imogen Heap to follow her debut album I Megaphone with her breakthrough Speak for Yourself (during which time Heap was in Frou Frou with Guy Sigsworth), so the four-year gap between it and its follow-up, Ellipse, feels relatively short.

Overview

It took seven years for Imogen Heap to follow her debut album I Megaphone with her breakthrough Speak for Yourself (during which time Heap was in Frou Frou with Guy Sigsworth), so the four-year gap between it and its follow-up, Ellipse, feels relatively short. Speak for Yourself's stunning single "Hide and Seek" took on a life of its own, partly thanks to its use in a crucial scene in the teen drama The O.C., but mostly because it was so spare and bittersweet: Heap's heavily processed vocals became more affecting because of those effects. That sound was so distinctive, it would have been easy for Heap to fall into the trap of trying to recapture that magic. Instead, Ellipse is some of her most wide-ranging work, physically and musically speaking. Heap recorded the album in locations ranging from Hawaii, Fiji, and Thailand to her home studio; while only a few songs feel overtly globe-trotting, like "2-1"'s slightly Eastern melody and the eco-conscious "Earth"'s African-tinged arrangement, Ellipse's well-traveled origins are revealed in the immediacy and urgency of its songs. Heap has a gift for crystallizing unique emotions in her music, and that's especially true of "Little Bird," which contrasts slightly dark meditations on everyday life ("Orange juice, concentrate/Crossword puzzles start to grate") with the musical equivalent of sunbeams, and "Between Sheets," which mixes romantic bliss and bubbly electronics so completely, it suggests her bed might be on a spaceship. Heap takes listeners on a tour of characters and attitudes far more eclectic than her previous albums, from "Bad Body Double"'s sassy rant about a copycat to "Wait it Out"'s breakup aftermath. Throughout it all, she never loses the slight oddness that makes her music so distinctive, whether she describes pulling away from a kiss as "mouths are fleshing over" on "First Train Home," scatters electronic blips and flute wisps through "Tidal," or makes "Aha!" witchy and mischievous enough to appear in a Tim Burton film. Soft but far from sedate, Ellipse might not have a single moment as arresting as "Hide and Seek," but it's some of Heap's most engaging work. [The deluxe edition of Ellipse includes a bonus disc of instrumental versions of the album's songs.]

Product Details

Release Date:
08/25/2009
Label:
Rca
UPC:
0886975060627
catalogNumber:
750606

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Imogen Heap   Primary Artist,Vocals,Sounds
Nitin Sawhney   Acoustic Guitar
Ian Burdge   Cello
Leo Abrahams   Electric Guitar
Arve Henriksen   Trumpet
Ashwin Srinivasan   Background Vocals
Ashwin Shrinivasan   Background Vocals
Oliver Langford   Violin

Technical Credits

Mark Wood   Management
Imogen Heap   Composer,Programming,Producer,Engineer
Jessica Butler   Projection
Michelle Thomas   Projection
Adriane Lake   Projection
Ewan Robertson   Producer,Concept
Albert Q Bui   Projection
Annelieke Bosdijk   Projection
Alex Carmichal   Projection
Randall Dameron   Projection
Vladislav Gusarov   Projection
J. Daniel Geddis   Projection
Nick Moulakis   Projection
Nathan Nye   Projection

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Ellipse 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 15 reviews.
melephant More than 1 year ago
I love Immi's new CD! It is so much fun to listen to... I actually went to the NYC signing of her CD, and she is soo very nice in person. She wanted to talk to each and every person that was there, even though there was not enough time scheduled for her to do so...
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lowlypeon More than 1 year ago
While it sure isn't the same as "Speak For Yourself," it is a nice follow up and is pleasing to the ears, especially after a few listens. It flows nicely together from song to song.
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