Elric: The Stealer of Souls (Chronicles of the Last Emperor of Melnibone #1)

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Overview

“The stories here are the raw heart of Michael Moorcock. They are the spells that first drew me and all the numerous admirers of his work with whom I am acquainted into Moorcock’s luminous and captivating web.”
–from the Foreword by Alan Moore, creator of V for Vendetta

When Michael Moorcock began chronicling the adventures of the albino sorcerer Elric, last king of decadent Melniboné, and his sentient vampiric sword, Stormbringer, he set out to create a new kind of fantasy adventure, one that broke with ...

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Elric: The Stealer of Souls (Chronicles of the Last Emperor of Melnibone #1)

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Overview

“The stories here are the raw heart of Michael Moorcock. They are the spells that first drew me and all the numerous admirers of his work with whom I am acquainted into Moorcock’s luminous and captivating web.”
–from the Foreword by Alan Moore, creator of V for Vendetta

When Michael Moorcock began chronicling the adventures of the albino sorcerer Elric, last king of decadent Melniboné, and his sentient vampiric sword, Stormbringer, he set out to create a new kind of fantasy adventure, one that broke with tradition and reflected a more up-to-date sophistication of theme and style. The result was a bold and unique hero–weak in body, subtle in mind, dependent on drugs for the vitality to sustain himself–with great crimes behind him and a greater destiny ahead: a rock-and-roll antihero who would channel all the violent excesses of the sixties into one enduring archetype.

Now, with a major film in development, here is the first volume of a dazzling collection of stories containing the seminal appearances of Elric and lavishly illustrated by award-winning artist John Picacio–plus essays, letters, maps, and other material. Adventures include “The Dreaming City,” “While the Gods Laugh,” “Kings in Darkness,” “Dead God’s Homecoming,” “Black Sword’s Brothers,” and “Sad Giant’s Shield.”

An indispensable addition to any fantasy collection, Elric: The Stealer of Souls is an unmatched introduction to a brilliant writer and his most famous–or infamous–creation.

“The most significant UK author of sword and sorcery, a form he has both borrowed from and transformed.”
–The Encyclopedia of Fantasy

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The release of this omnibus, illustrated 480-page volume is a major fantasy publishing event. British author Michael Moorcock is best known, especially in the United States, for his tales of Elric, but these classic stories have been held out of print for years by his agent. Now this influential antihero reemerges with his comprehensive collector's edition. Elric: The Sealer of Souls contains the stories that made its title character and Moorcock famous: "The Dreaming City, "While the Gods Laugh," "The Stealer of Souls, "Kings in Darkness," "The Flamebringers," "Dead God's Homecoming," "Black Sword's Brothers," "Sad Giant's Shield," and "Doomed Lord's Passing." In addition to these fantasy standards, this paperback original contains an introduction by Alan Moore, a foreword by Moorcock, and several background essays and other additional material.
Library Journal

In the 1960s, Moorcock developed his Elric character, who may have been the last ruler of the mythic empire of Melnibone but nonetheless reflected the times: he was decadent, conflicted, and a drug user. The character caught on, appearing in several Moorcock tales as well as in short stories and novels written by others and in comics and role-playing games. Now a film based on Elric is in discussion. Featuring an intro by Alan Moore, this is the first of six illustrated volumes reproducing Elric's adventures.


—Michael Rogers
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Product Details

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Chapter One

“What’s the hour?” The black-bearded man wrenched off his gilded helmet and flung it from him, careless of where it fell. He drew off his leathern gauntlets and moved closer to the roaring fire, letting the heat soak into his frozen bones.

“Midnight is long past,” growled one of the other armoured men who gathered around the blaze. “Are you still sure he’ll come?” “It’s said that he’s a man of his word, if that comforts you.”

It was a tall, pale-faced youth who spoke. His thin lips formed the words and spat them out maliciously. He grinned a wolf-grin and stared the new arrival in the eyes, mocking him.

The newcomer turned away with a shrug. “That’s so—for all your irony, Yaris. He’ll come.” He spoke as a man does when he wishes to reassure himself.

There were six men, now, around the fire. The sixth was Smiorgan—Count Smiorgan Baldhead of the Purple Towns. He was a short, stocky man of fifty years with a scarred face partially covered with a thick, black growth of hair. His morose eyes smouldered and his lumpy fingers plucked nervously at his rich-hilted longsword. His pate was hairless, giving him his name, and over his ornate, gilded armour hung a loose woolen cloak, dyed purple.

Smiorgan said thickly, “He has no love for his cousin. He has become bitter. Yyrkoon sits on the Ruby Throne in his place and has proclaimed him an outlaw and a traitor. Elric needs us if he would take his throne and his bride back. We can trust him.”

“You’re full of trust tonight, count,” Yaris smiled thinly, “a rare thing to find in these troubled times. I say this—” He paused and took a long breath, staring at his comrades, summing them up. His gaze flicked from lean-faced Dharmit of Jharkor to Fadan of Lormyr who pursed his podgy lips and looked into the fire.

“Speak up, Yaris,” petulantly urged the patrician-featured Vilmirian, Naclon. “Let’s hear what you have to say, lad, if it’s worth hearing.”

Yaris looked towards Jiku the dandy, who yawned impolitely and scratched his long nose.

“Well!” Smiorgan was impatient. “What d’you say, Yaris?”

“I say that we should start now and waste no more time waiting on Elric’s pleasure! He’s laughing at us in some tavern a hundred miles from here—or else plotting with the Dragon Princes to trap us. For years we have planned this raid. We have little time in which to strike—our fleet is too big, too noticeable. Even if Elric has not betrayed us, then spies will soon be running eastwards to warn the Dragons that there is a fleet massed against them. We stand to win a fantastic fortune—to vanquish the greatest merchant city in the world—to reap immeasurable riches—or horrible death at the hands of the Dragon Princes, if we wait overlong. Let’s bide our time no more and set sail before our prize hears of our plan and brings up reinforcements!”

“You always were too ready to mistrust a man, Yaris.” King Naclon of Vilmir spoke slowly, carefully—distastefully eyeing the taut-featured youth. “We could not reach Imrryr without Elric’s knowledge of the maze-channels which lead to its secret ports. If Elric will not join us—then our endeavour will be fruitless—hopeless. We need him. We must wait for him—or else give up our plans and return to our homelands.”

“At least I’m willing to take a risk,” yelled Yaris, anger lancing from his slanting eyes. “You’re getting old—all of you. Treasures are not won by care and forethought but by swift slaying and reckless attack.”

“Fool!” Dharmit’s voice rumbled around the fire-flooded hall. He laughed wearily. “I spoke thus in my youth—and lost a fine fleet soon after. Cunning and Elric’s knowledge will win us Imrryr—that and the mightiest fleet to sail the Dragon Sea since Melniboné’s banners fluttered over all the nations of the Earth. Here we are—the most powerful sea-lords in the world, masters, every one of us, of more than a hundred swift vessels. Our names are feared and famous—our fleets ravage the coasts of a score of lesser nations. We hold power!” He clenched his great fist and shook it in Yaris’s face. His tone became more level and he smiled viciously, glaring at the youth and choosing his words with precision.

“But all this is worthless—meaningless—without the power which Elric has. That is the power of knowledge—of dream-learned sorcery, if I must use the cursed word. His fathers knew of the maze which guards Imrryr from sea-attack. And his fathers passed that secret on to him. Imrryr, the Dreaming City, dreams in peace—and will continue to do so unless we have a guide to help us steer a course through the treacherous waterways which lead to her harbours. We need Elric—we know it, and he knows it. That’s the truth!”

“Such confidence, gentlemen, is warming to the heart.” There was irony in the heavy voice which came from the entrance to the hall. The heads of the six sea-lords jerked towards the doorway.

Yaris’s confidence fled from him as he met the eyes of Elric of Melniboné. They were old eyes in a fine featured, youthful face. Yaris shuddered, turned his back on Elric, preferring to look into the bright glare of the fire.

Elric smiled warmly as Count Smiorgan gripped his shoulder. There was a certain friendship between the two. He nodded condescendingly to the other four and walked with lithe grace towards the fire. Yaris stood aside and let him pass. Elric was tall, broad-shouldered and slim-hipped. He wore his long hair bunched and pinned at the nape of his neck and, for an obscure reason, affected the dress of a southern barbarian. He had long, knee-length boots of soft doe-leather, a breastplate of strangely wrought silver, a jerkin of chequered blue and white linen, britches of scarlet wool and a cloak of rustling green velvet. At his hip rested his runesword of black iron—the feared Stormbringer, forged by ancient and alien sorcery.

His bizarre dress was tasteless and gaudy, and did not match his sensitive face and long-fingered, almost delicate hands, yet he flaunted it since it emphasized the fact that he did not belong in any company—that he was an outsider and an outcast. But, in reality, he had little need to wear such outlandish gear—for his eyes and skin were enough to mark him.

Elric, Last Lord of Melniboné, was a pure albino who drew his power from a secret and terrible source.

Smiorgan sighed. “Well, Elric, when do we raid Imrryr?”

Elric shrugged. “As soon as you like; I care not. Give me a little time in which to do certain things.”

“Tomorrow? Shall we sail tomorrow?” Yaris said hesitantly, conscious of the strange power dormant in the man he had earlier accused of treachery.

Elric smiled, dismissing the youth’s statement. “Three days’ time,” he said, “Three—or more.”

“Three days! But Imrryr will be warned of our presence by then!” Fat, cautious Fadan spoke.

“I’ll see that your fleet’s not found,” Elric promised. “I have to go to Imrryr first—and return.”

“You won’t do the journey in three days—the fastest ship could not make it.” Smiorgan gaped.

“I’ll be in the Dreaming City in less than a day,” Elric said softly, with finality.

Smiorgan shrugged. “If you say so, I’ll believe it—but why this necessity to visit the city ahead of the raid?”

“I have my own compunctions, Count Smiorgan. But worry not—I shan’t betray you. I’ll lead the raid myself, be sure of that.” His dead-white face was lighted eerily by the fire and his red eyes smouldered. One lean hand firmly gripped the hilt of his runesword and he appeared to breathe more heavily. “Imrryr fell, in spirit, five hundred years ago—she will fall completely soon—for ever! I have a little debt to settle. This is my sole reason for aiding you. As you know I have made only a few conditions—that you raze the city to the ground and a certain man and woman are not harmed. I refer to my cousin Yyrkoon and his sister Cymoril . . .”

Yaris’s thin lips felt uncomfortably dry. Much of his blustering manner resulted from the early death of his father. The old sea-king had died—leaving the youthful Yaris as the new ruler of his lands and his fleets. Yaris was not at all certain that he was capable of commanding such a vast kingdom—and tried to appear more confident than he actually felt. Now he said: “How shall we hide the fleet, Lord Elric?”

The Melnibonéan acknowledged the question. “I’ll hide it for you,” he promised. “I go now to do this—but make sure all your men are off the ships first—will you see to it, Smiorgan?”

“Aye,” rumbled the stocky count.

He and Elric departed from the hall together, leaving five men behind; five men who sensed an air of icy doom hanging about the overheated hall.

“How could he hide such a mighty fleet when we, who know this fjord better than any, found nowhere?” Dharmit of Jharkor said bewilderedly.

None answered him.

They waited, tensed and nervous, while the fire flickered and died untended. Eventually Smiorgan returned, stamping noisily on the boarded floor. There was a haunted haze of fear surrounding him; an almost tangible aura, and he was shivering, terribly. Tremendous, racking undulations swept up his body and his breath came short.

“Well? Did Elric hide the fleet—all at once? What did he do?” Dharmit spoke impatiently, choosing not to heed Smiorgan’s ominous condition.

“He has hidden it.” That was all Smiorgan said, and his voice was thin, like that of a sick man, weak from fever.

Yaris went to the entrance and tried to stare beyond the fjord slopes where many campfires burned, tried to make out the outlines of ships’ masts and rigging, but he could see nothing.

“The night mist’s too thick,” he murmured, “I can’t tell whether our ships are anchored in the fjord or not.” Then he gasped involuntarily as a white face loomed out of the clinging fog. “Greetings, Lord Elric,” he stuttered, noting the sweat on the Melnibonéan’s strained features.

Elric staggered past him, into the hall. “Wine,” he mumbled, “I’ve done what’s needed and it’s cost me hard.”

Dharmit fetched a jug of strong Cadsandrian wine and with a shaking hand poured some into a carved wooden goblet. Wordlessly he passed the cup to Elric who quickly drained it. “Now I will sleep,” he said, stretching himself into a chair and wrapping his green cloak around him. He closed his disconcerting crimson eyes and fell into a slumber born of utter weariness.

Fadan scurried to the door, closed it and pulled the heavy iron bar down.

None of the six slept much that night and, in the morning, the door was unbarred and Elric was missing from the chair. When they went outside, the mist was so heavy that they soon lost sight of one another, though scarcely two feet separated any of them.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 46 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 46 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2013

    Terrible Rendition of the Elric Series

    If you are unfamiliar with the Elric novels, do not buy! Wait for SFGateway to re-release the original novels.

    This version of the series is terribly disjointed with the first book in this series containing parts of the 3rd, 5th and all of the 6th original novels. The third book in this series matches up with the 4th original novel. And the fourth book in this series matches up with the 2nd original novel. If you are not already familiar with the novels, good luck putting it all together or understanding the motivations of the characters.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 17, 2012

    A highly-recommended classic!

    I first discovered Moorcock's Elric and The Eternal Champion saga in 7th grade. I have read every English edition and I recommend them all to the neophyte and to the subject matter expert if one has never had the pleasure. Makes me want to break out my AD&D gear and my vorpal sword! :)

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 31, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    The novel above is half of Elric In the Dream Realms and it is one of his greatest early tales

    "Fortress Of The Pearl". Lord Gho Fhaazi wants a position on the Council of Seven that rules over the city of Quarzhasaat, but he knows he needs help to overcome his rivals. He chooses Prince Elric of Melnibone as his tool to obtain the Pearl at the Heart of the World that will insure his spot on the council. To insure Elric cooperates, he poisons him using a slow acting agent in which he has the serum. Elric begins his escapades as the affluent class' minion the Sorcerer Adventurers try to prevent his success and eventually trap his mind inside that of a comatose teenage female, but with the Dreamthief to guide him through the Dream Realm, Elric continues his quest.

    The novel above is half of Elric In the Dream Realms and it is one of his greatest early tales and makes the book worth reading. The short story "A Portrait in Ivory" is terrific also as the albino hero is confronted by his worst enemy, the mirror reminding him he should be known as Elric Kinslayer filled with remorse for Cymoril more so than Imrryr. The other entries like "Elric: The Making of a Graphic Novel", the essay "Aspects of Fantasy", and the background material of "Earl Aubec of Malodor", etc. target die hard fans of Michael Moorcock only. Overall the fifth Chronicles of the last Emperor of Melnibone is an engaging look at Elric In The Dream realms.

    Harriet Klausner

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 30, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Michael Moorcocks's Eternal Champion.

    Elric the Stealer of Souls starts a series of books collecting Moorcock's Eternal Champion cycle. The Eternal Champion is a character that is reincarnated in differant times and places to fight for balance between the forces of extreme Order and Chaos.

    The first few books are about Elric last emperor of Melnibonie who carries the soul stealing blade Stormbringer.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 7, 2011

    Elric

    Elric: The Stealer of Souls is the story of Elric, the last of his noble line, and his travels. Elric has left his kingdom behind and is exploring the outlying lands with Stormbringer, his sentient sword. Being a dark fantasy, Elric's adventures are filled with horrendous creatures, evil beings and violent encounters. Moorcock does a fabulous job developing the characters and setting his scenes. The world he creates is well thought out and planned. There were occasional scenes that didn't quite ring true to me, but not so much that they seemed off. Enjoyable read and recommended to those who enjoy the genre, but those who don't should probably pass.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 19, 2009

    ELRIC: More complete than ever...

    Del Rey's current release of Michael Moorcock's Elric was conceived as an authoritative edition of the Albino king, who is a a central incarnation of Moorcock's Eternal Champion. I've been picking these up as they come out to the tune of what is currently five volumes, of which DUKE ELRIC is volume 4. Leaving my starred-rating breakdown as a commentary on the quality of the work, I'll leave additional explanation here to qualify and elucidate my feeling on DUKE ELRIC, in particular. Some of these comments may be extended in general to my feeling toward the series as a whole, that being favorable. So, DUKE ELRIC. This book contains the text of a segment of ELRIC titled THE SAILOR ON THE SEAS OF FATE, which had appeared in earlier editions as a familiar episode in the ELRIC saga often represented as part 2 of the cycle. That it appears as late in the current edition as volume 4 illustrates a point: Moorcock, like Gaiman and others after him, allows reinterpretation of his ideas with ELRIC being a prime example. I've compared this text of SAILOR with that in the Science Fiction Book Club edition and found differences as significant as the addition and deletion of full paragraphs in the early pages, and British versus American usage differences in some word choices. That the current edition is to be considered authoritative may, I suppose, be accepted given the author is alive, has allowed this, and has provided essays and other material, some new. Further comparison of early pages shows this edition to match more closely the text included in the White Wolf collectible hardcover ELRIC: SONG OF THE BLACK SWORD for those who desire to know, although neither comparison is comprehensive. Further inclusions in this volume are text of an ELRIC graphic novel titled DUKE ELRIC, and part 2 of Moorcock's essay ASPECTS OF FANTASY, as well as other related material. I very much like this series as it contains a longer view of the ELRIC cycle than we've had in a uniform edition, with material as diverse as essays, graphic novels, early, rare art, and good, authoritative editions of the familiar text.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 14, 2009

    Horrible waste of an evening.

    Horrible waste of an evening, in retrospect I should have taken my wife out to dinner, vacuumed the carpets, went to sleep a couple hours earlier, anything else.

    It should have been mandatory that they put in big letters on the back that none of the stories are remotely related except for the characters.
    A thing I found truly irritating was that most of the stories are inconsistent about Elric and feel like there was two or three ghost writers filling in for the author.

    Every time one of the stories started getting interesting, it either ended abruptly with little closure or ending, and then jumped to a different story, or went on a completely different path unrelated. There were a couple times I was flipping back and forth, trying to figure out what happened, only to then realize that the last chapter was the end of the story, that the author abandoned the story again and went on to something else without finishing anything.

    Instead of being an epic tale or series of tales, it reminds me more of my grandfather's old rambling stories that have no point, reason, or entertaining value.

    This is NOT an epic tale, and if this is the greatest writer of British fantasy after Tolkien the book reviewers need to at least put an ad up at a high school, I've seen better writing come out of an Architecture class.

    1 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 25, 2009

    Sailor on the Seas of Fate

    This particular volume contains "The Sailor on the Seas of Fate" novel in Michael Moorcock's Elric cycle. When I first read this novel as a kid I never really rated it (I wasn't keen on the Eternal Champion team-up stories) but reading it again recently it really impressed me. The story begins with our anti-hero on a stony shore, alone and on the run. Here's a slightly edited sample of the first chapter right from the top:

    "It was as if the man stood in a vast cavern whose walls and roof were comprised of gloomy, unstable colours which would occasionally break and admit rays of light from the moon. That these walls were mere clouds massed above mountains and ocean was hard to believe, for all that the moonlight pierced them, stained them and revealed the black and turbulent sea washing the shore on which the man now stood.

    "Distant thunder rolled; distant lightning flickered. A thin rain fell. And the clouds were never still. From dusky jet to deadly white they swirled slowly...

    "The sea seemed weary. Great waves heaved themselves together with difficulty and collapsed as in relief, gasping as they struck sharp rocks."

    Those last two sentences are quite possibly the best I've read all year.

    The writing is crisp and assured and the pacing and structure are tight. Like many of his fantasy novels, however, it's perhaps a little too brisk at times for my tastes when the action and plot overtake atmosphere and texture. But when it is atmospheric, as per the quote above, it is suitably fantastic - in some places even disorienting, such as the distant far future in the first part of the novel which was reminiscent of those of Jack Vance and William Hope Hodgson.

    If you like fantasy with a lot of flavour and have never read any Elric before then I highly suggest you push this series to the top of your list. It's a surprisingly light read too for all the detail and action. Although it's often violent and sometimes gruesome, the series is never as gothic as some of its fans make it out to be - and if that's what you're after you're probably better off checking out Mervyn Peake's "Gormenghast" series. This is more along the lines of swash-buckling dark fantasy with a modern sensibility.

    It's worth noting that it doesn't really matter what order you read the books because Moorcock wrote the end of Elric's saga about a decade before he published its beginning. Which brings me to another small criticism I have with this novel, and perhaps my only real one: while the beginning of Sailors blew me away, the foreshadowing at the very end of the novel (the last sentence or two) felt a little heavy-handed and slightly bathetic, especially as we all know how the saga ends. But this is a small quibble in a novel and and writer well worth your time.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2009

    Kinda boring.

    Kinda boring.

    0 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted October 19, 2010

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    Posted December 7, 2009

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    Posted January 28, 2010

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    Posted December 22, 2009

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    Posted March 21, 2012

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    Posted April 3, 2011

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    Posted December 7, 2009

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    Posted September 2, 2011

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    Posted February 14, 2010

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    Posted November 16, 2010

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    Posted June 19, 2011

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