Elsie Times Eight

Elsie Times Eight

by Natalie Babbitt
     
 

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Fairy godmothers are supposed to set things straight, but Elsie's fairy godmother sometimes sets things wrong. When she changes one Elsie into eight, the results make a mess for everyone, from Elsie's cat right on up to the Mayor. And the noise! Well, it's so bad that Elsie and her family, including cat and goats, have to look for somewhere else to live. But al comes

Overview

Fairy godmothers are supposed to set things straight, but Elsie's fairy godmother sometimes sets things wrong. When she changes one Elsie into eight, the results make a mess for everyone, from Elsie's cat right on up to the Mayor. And the noise! Well, it's so bad that Elsie and her family, including cat and goats, have to look for somewhere else to live. But al comes out right in the end--unless you are a mouse.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Elsie's well-meaning fairy godmother is a little hard of hearing. When her mama reports that Elsie has been a much better girl than "before," her fairy godmother hears it as a request that Elsie "be four," and with a wave of her magic wand, multiplies the girl. "No! WAIT!" cries Elsie's papa only making things worse, as Elsie's fairy godmother hears "eight" and promptly complies. Soon even the mayor complains about the "rowdydow and racket" from the octet of Elsies and, when all else fails, banishes the family. All is set to rights in the end, of course (Elsie's cat pinpoints the original heroine; but then the fairy godmother makes the feline "twenty" when Papa says "plenty"). Babbitt's (Bub) merry tale of magical mix-up and mayhem unfolds without a hitch; however, the illustrations fare somewhat less favorably. With characters dressed in vaguely medieval garb, the watercolor and pencil artwork takes on a deliberateness that borders on the pedestrian. While some of the characters are expressive (including a hilarious baby, goggle-eyed in surprise at the sudden bounty of Elsies), others appear oddly flat, creating an overall visual effect that detracts from the narrative's strengths. All ages. (Sept.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
What do you do with a fairy godmother who makes things all wrong instead of all right? Elsie's godmother means well, but sometimes she doesn't hear things very well. And well, that's when things might go wrong. In this delightful picture book, Elsie's godmother changes one Elsie into eight with a few waves of her wand. That's when the trouble, confusion, noise—and the fun—begins. Eight Elsies add up to a mess for everyone from the family cat to the mayor, who eventually asks them to find somewhere else to live. On their way to a new town, the family and all eight Elsies run into the fairy godmother. She is glad to help turn the eight back into one, but how will she know which one is the first Elsie? That's when Elsie's cat lends a hand. All comes out right in the end—unless you are a mouse. Kids will enjoy the fairy tale feel of this charming story, as well as the delicate watercolor illustrations. The full cast of characters include goats, dogs, townspeople and family members, each rendered in portrait-like detail. Most delightful is Elsie's fairy godmother herself, who has the look of a modern grandmother, despite the wings and white gown. Kids will enjoy counting the various Elsies on each page and will love the surprise mathematical ending. 2001, Michael di Capua Books/Hyperion Books for Children, $15.95. Ages 4 to 9. Reviewer:Dianne Ochiltree

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786809011
Publisher:
Disney-Hyperion
Publication date:
09/28/2001
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 10.75(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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