Emerging Patterns of Innovation: Sources of Japan's Technological Edge

Overview

Kodama uses the concept of a techno-paradigm shift to express the radical changes in the way technology has been and continues to be developed, applied, and commercialized over time. In analyzing data gathered over ten years of intensive research and study of Japanese firms, he distinguishes six dimensions along which the shift is occurring: manufacturing, business diversification, R&D competition, product development, innovation pattern, and societal diffusion of technology. He illuminates his discussion of ...
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0875844375 Harvard Business School hardcover with great dustjacket

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Overview

Kodama uses the concept of a techno-paradigm shift to express the radical changes in the way technology has been and continues to be developed, applied, and commercialized over time. In analyzing data gathered over ten years of intensive research and study of Japanese firms, he distinguishes six dimensions along which the shift is occurring: manufacturing, business diversification, R&D competition, product development, innovation pattern, and societal diffusion of technology. He illuminates his discussion of each dimension with a profile of specific technologies and the companies that have advanced them, including consumer electronics (Sony and Toshiba), fiber optic cables (Sumitomo Electric), computers and communications equipment (NEC), machine tools (Fanuc), and automobile parts (Honda, Toyota, and Nissan). The concepts presented in Emerging Patterns of Innovation not only have implications for the competitive strategies of non-Japanese firms and the economic policies of their corresponding nations, but could also help promote important international alliances in technological development at both the business and the national levels. In particular, Kodama describes his vision of option sharing, through which it is possible to resolve the tensions between international cooperation and national autonomy as well as to promote a nonprotectionist, "plus-sum game" in technological innovation that would benefit the world as a whole.

For managers seeking to understand how Japan has sustained a premiere position in high-technology industries, Kodama provides a well-substantiated model that sheds light on competition in technology across the globe. Features a Foreword by Lewis M. Branscomb.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Combining scientific measurement, case studies, and historical perspective, Kodama illustrates the ways in which development, application, and commercialization of technology is changing manufacturing, business diversification, R&D competition, product development, innovation pattern, and societal diffusion of technology. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
David Rouse
Kodama's analysis shows that the Japanese have not, as some suggest, adapted their business, economic, and social systems to take maximum advantage of leading and changing technologies. Instead, he argues, these technologies intrinsically suit the Japanese. Kodama builds a model of how Japanese companies manage innovation and technological change; he identifies six areas where most change is occurring: manufacturing, diversification, research and development competition, product development, innovation pattern, and societal diffusion of technology. Kodama is a professor of science, technology, and industry at the University of Tokyo, and he has been a visiting professor at Stanford and at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government. Although the author is Japanese, his language is pure "bizschoolspeak" ; he writes of techno-paradigm shifts, demand articulation, knowledge creation, and upstream linkages. Kodama also includes rigorous mathematical analysis of data he has compiled for 10 years. Recommended for academic or major business collections.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780875844374
  • Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press
  • Publication date: 4/1/1995
  • Series: Management of Innovation and Change
  • Pages: 336
  • Product dimensions: 6.45 (w) x 9.52 (h) x 1.40 (d)

Table of Contents

List of Figures
List of Tables
Foreword
Preface
Introduction 1
Ch. 1 Manufacturing: From Producing to Knowledge Creation 18
Ch. 2 Business Diversification: From Spin-Off to Trickle-Up Process 54
Ch. 3 R&D Competition: From Dominant-Design to Interindustry Competition 99
Ch. 4 Product Development: From Pipeline to Demand Articulation 142
Ch. 5 Innovation Pattern: From Breakthrough to Technology Fusion 189
Ch. 6 Societal Diffusion: From Technical Evolution to Institutional Coevolution 237
Epilogue Techno-Globalism by Option Sharing 278
Index 287
About the Author 299
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