EMF: Eclipse Modeling Framework (The Eclipse Series) / Edition 2

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Overview

EMF: Eclipse Modeling Framework

Dave Steinberg

Frank Budinsky

Marcelo Paternostro

Ed Merks

Series Editors: Erich Gamma • Lee Nackman • John Wiegand

The Authoritative Guide to EMF Modeling and Code Generation

The Eclipse Modeling Framework enables developers to rapidly construct robust applications based on surprisingly simple models. Now, in this thoroughly revised Second Edition, the project’s developers offer expert guidance, insight, and examples for solving real-world problems with EMF, accelerating development processes, and improving software quality.

This edition contains more than 40% new material, plus updates throughout to make it even more useful and practical. The authors illuminate the key concepts and techniques of EMF modeling, analyze EMF’s most important framework classes and generator patterns, guide you through choosing optimal designs, and introduce powerful framework customizations and programming techniques. Coverage includes

• Defining models with Java, UML, XML Schema, and Ecore

• NEW: Using extended Ecore modeling to fully unify XML with UML and Java

• Generating high-quality code to implement models and editors

• Understanding and customizing generated code

• Complete documentation of @model Javadoc tags, generator model properties, and resource save and load options

• NEW: Leveraging the latest EMF features, including extended metadata, feature maps, EStore, cross-reference adapters, copiers, and content types

• NEW: Chapters on change recording, validation, and utilizing EMF in stand-alone and Eclipse RCP applications

• NEW: Modeling generics with Ecore and generating Java 5 code

About the Authors

Dave Steinberg is a software developer in IBM Software Group. He has worked with Eclipse and modeling technologies since joining the company, and has been a committer on the EMF project since its debut in 2002.

Frank Budinsky, a senior architect in IBM Software Group, is an original coinventor of EMF and a founding member of the EMF project at Eclipse. He is currently cochair of the Service Data Objects (SDO) specification technical committee at OASIS and lead SDO architect for IBM.

Marcelo Paternostro is a software architect and engineer in IBM Software Group. He is an EMF committer and has been an active contributor to several other Eclipse projects. Before joining IBM, Marcelo managed, designed, and implemented numerous projects using Rational's tools and processes.

Ed Merks is the project lead of EMF and a colead of the top-level Modeling project at Eclipse. He holds a Ph.D. in Computing Science and has many years of in-depth experience in the design and implementation of languages, frameworks, and application development environments. Ed works as a software consultant in partnership with itemis AG.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780321331885
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley
  • Publication date: 2/20/2009
  • Series: Eclipse Series
  • Edition description: Revised and Updated
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 704
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Dave Steinberg is a software developer in IBM Software Group. He has worked with Eclipse and modeling technologies since joining the company, and has been a committer on the EMF project since its debut in 2002.

Frank Budinsky, a senior architect in IBM Software Group, is an original coinventor of EMF and a founding member of the EMF project at Eclipse. He is currently cochair of the Service Data Objects (SDO) specification technical committee at OASIS and lead SDO architect for IBM.

Marcelo Paternostro is a software architect and engineer in IBM Software Group. He is an EMF committer and has been an active contributor to several other Eclipse projects. Before joining IBM, Marcelo managed, designed, and implemented numerous projects using Rational's tools and processes.

Ed Merks is the project lead of EMF and a colead of the top-level Modeling project at Eclipse. He holds a Ph.D. in Computing Science and has many years of in-depth experience in the design and implementation of languages, frameworks, and application development environments. Ed works as a software consultant in partnership with itemis AG.

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Read an Excerpt

Preface

This book is a comprehensive introduction and developer’s guide to the Eclipse Modeling Framework (EMF). EMF is a powerful framework and code generation facility for building Java applications based on simple model definitions. Designed to make modeling practical and useful to the mainstream Java programmer, EMF unifies three important technologies: Java,

By relating modeling concepts to the simple Java representations of those concepts, EMF has successfully bridged the gap between modelers and Java programmers. It serves as a gentle introduction to modeling for Java programmers and at the same time as a reinforcement of the modeler’s theory that a great deal of coding can be automated, given an appropriate tool. This book shows how EMF is such a tool. It also shows how using EMF lets you do more with your models that you might have thought possible.

EMF provides a runtime framework that allows any modeled data to be easily validated, persisted, and edited in a UI. Change notification and recording are supported automatically. Metadata is available to enable generic processing of any data using a uniform, reflective API. With all of these features and more, EMF is the foundation for data sharing and fine-grained interoperability among tools and applications in Eclipse, in much the same way that Eclipse is itself a platform for integration at the component and UI level. Numerous organizations are currently using Eclipse, EMF, and the growing number of EMF-based technologies in the Eclipse Modeling Project as the foundation for their own commercial and open source offerings.

This book assumes the reader is familiar with object-oriented programming concepts and specifically with the Java programming language. Previous exposure to modeling technologies such as UML, although helpful, is not required. Part I (Chapters 1 to 4) provides a basic overview of the most important concepts in EMF and modeling. This part teaches someone with basic Java programming skills everything needed to start using EMF to model and build an application. Part II (Chapters 5 to 9) presents a thorough overview of EMF’s metamodel, Ecore, followed by details of the mappings between Ecore and the other supported model-definition forms: UML, annotated Java, and

The bulk of this book is based on EMF 2.2, the last version to support the venerable Java 1.4 language. In version 2.3, EMF adopted key language features of Java 5.0, making it incompatible with previous Java runtimes. EMF 2.2, which was current while much of this book was written, is therefore still popular and an excellent base for learning about the framework. The code in Chapters 1 to 20 is based on that version, but due to EMF’s backward compatibility, all examples run without change on version 2.4, the latest at the time of this book’s release. Chapter 21 focuses specifically on changes in EMF 2.3 and 2.4 and, as such, uses 2.4 as the basis for its examples.

Conventions Used in This Book

The following formatting conventions are used throughout this book:

  • Bold—Used for the names of model elements, such as packages, classes, attributes, and references; and of user-interface elements, including menus, buttons, tabs, and text boxes.
  • Italic—Used for filenames and URIs, as well as for placeholder text that is meant to be replaced by a particular name. New terms are often italicized for emphasis. Also, in Chapter 9’s example mappings, items shown purely to provide context appear in italics.
  • Courier—Used for all code samples and for in-text references to code elements, including the names of Java packages, classes, interfaces, methods, fields, variables, and keywords. Plug-in names, command lines, and elements of non-Java files, including
  • Courier Bold—Used to emphasize portions of code samples, usually new insertions or changes.
  • Courier Strikethrough—Used in code samples to indicate that text should be deleted.
Online Examples

The Web site for this book is located at http://www.informit.com/title/9780321331885. All of the example models and code used throughout this book can be downloaded from there. The site will also provide an errata list, and other news related to the book.

Eclipse and EMF are required to use the examples. You can download one of several Eclipse packages (we recommend Eclipse Classic) at http://www.eclipse.org/downloads/ and the all-in-one EMF SDK at http://www.eclipse.org/modeling/emf/downloads/.

© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

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Table of Contents

Foreword by Richard C. Gronback xix

Foreword by Mike Milinkovich xxi

Preface xxiii

Acknowledgments xxvii

References xxix

Part I EMF Overview 1

Chapter 1 Eclipse 3

1.1 The Projects 4

1.1.1 The Eclipse Project 4

1.1.2 The Modeling Project 5

1.1.3 The Tools Project 5

1.1.4 The Technology Project 5

1.1.5 Other Projects 5

1.2 The Eclipse Platform 6

1.2.1 Plug-In Architecture 6

1.2.2 Workspace Resources 7

1.2.3 Platform UI 7

1.2.4 Rich Client Platform 9

1.3 More Information 9

Chapter 2 Introducing EMF 11

2.1 Unifying Java, XML, and UML 12

2.2 Modeling vs. Programming 15

2.3 Defining the Model 16

2.3.1 The Ecore (Meta) Model 17

2.3.2 Creating and Editing the Model 19

2.3.3 XMI Serialization 20

2.3.4 Java Annotations 21

2.3.5 The Ecore “Big Picture” 23

2.4 Generating Code 23

2.4.1 Generated Model Classes 24

2.4.2 Other Generated “Stuff” 26

2.4.3 Regeneration and Merge 27

2.4.4 The Generator Model 28

2.5 The Runtime Framework 29

2.5.1 Notification and Adapters 29

2.5.2 Object Persistence 31

2.5.3 The Reflective EObject API 35

2.5.4 Dynamic EMF 36

2.5.5 Foundation for Data Integration 38

2.6 EMF and Modeling Standards 39

2.6.1 Unified Modeling Language 39

2.6.2 Meta-Object Facility 39

2.6.3 XML Metadata Interchange 40

2.6.4 Model Driven Architecture 40

Chapter 3 Model Editing with EMF.Edit 41

3.1 Displaying and Editing EMF Models 42

3.1.1 Eclipse UI Basics 43

3.1.2 EMF.Edit Support 45

3.2 Item Providers 46

3.2.1 Content and Label Item Providers 47

3.2.2 Item Property Source 49

3.2.3 Command Factory 50

3.2.4 Change Notification 51

3.2.5 Item Provider Implementation Classes 53

3.3 Command Framework 54

3.3.1 Common Command Framework 55

3.3.2 EMF.Edit Commands 59

3.3.3 EditingDomain 61

3.4 Generating EMF.Edit Code 65

3.4.1 Edit Generation 66

3.4.2 Editor Generation 67

3.4.3 Regenerating EMF.Edit Plug-Ins 68

Chapter 4 Using EMF–A Simple Overview 69

4.1 Example Model: The Primer Purchase Order 70

4.2 Creating EMF Models and Projects 71

4.2.1 Creating an EMF Model from Annotated Java 72

4.2.2 Creating an EMF Project from a Rational Rose Class Model 80

4.2.3 Creating an EMF Project from an XML Schema 86

4.2.4 Creating a Generator Model for an Ecore Model 89

4.2.5 Other Formats 92

4.3 Generating Code 93

4.4 Running the Application 95

4.5 Continuing Development 98

Part II Defining EMF Models 101

Chapter 5 Ecore Modeling Concepts 103

5.1 Ecore Model Uses 104

5.2 The Ecore Kernel 105

5.3 Structural Features 106

5.3.1 Attributes 110

5.3.2 References 111

5.4 Behavioral Features 112

5.5 Classifiers 113

5.5.1 Classes 114

5.5.2 Data Types 116

5.6 Packages and Factories 118

5.7 Annotations 119

5.7.1 Annotations in EMF 121

5.8 Modeled Data Types 123

5.9 Ecore and User Models 125

Chapter 6 UML 127

6.1 UML Packages 128

6.2 UML Specification for Classifiers 128

6.2.1 Classes 129

6.2.2 Enumerated Types 130

6.2.3 Data Types 131

6.3 UML Specification for Attributes 132

6.3.1 Single-Valued Attributes 132

6.3.2 Multi-Valued Attributes 133

6.3.3 Attributes with a Default Value 133

6.4 UML Specification for References 134

6.4.1 Bidirectional, Non-Containment References 135

6.4.2 Containment References 136

6.4.3 Map References 136

6.5 UML Specification for Operations 138

6.6 Documentation 140

6.7 Ecore Properties in Rational Rose 140

6.7.1 Package Properties 141

6.7.2 Classifier Properties 142

6.7.3 Structural Feature Properties 142

6.7.4 Operation Properties 143

6.7.5 Model Element Properties 144

Chapter 7 Java Source Code 145

7.1 Java Specification for Classes 146

7.1.1 Attributes 147

7.1.2 References 150

7.1.3 Compact Notation for Attributes and References 152

7.1.4 Operations 153

7.2 Java Specification for Enumerated Types 158

7.2.1 Enumeration Literals 158

7.3 Java Specification for Packages 159

7.3.1 Data Types 160

7.4 Java Specification for Maps 161

7.4.1 Explicit Definition of Map Entry Classes in a Package 161

7.4.2 Definition of Map-Typed References, Operations, and Parameters 163

7.5 Java Specification for Annotations 164

Chapter 8 Extended Ecore Modeling 167

8.1 Feature Maps 168

8.1.1 Multiple Features and Cross-Feature Order 168

8.1.2 The FeatureMap Interface 171

8.2 Modeling with Feature Maps 173

8.2.1 UML 173

8.2.2 Annotated Java 175

8.2.3 XML Schema 176

Chapter 9 XML Schema 179

9.1 Schema 180

9.1.1 Schema without Target Namespace 180

9.1.2 Schema with Target Namespace 181

9.1.3 Global Element or Attribute Declaration 182

9.1.4 Element or Attribute Form Default 183

9.1.5 EMF Extensions 183

9.2 Simple Type Definitions 184

9.2.1 Restriction 184

9.2.2 Restriction with Enumeration Facets 186

9.2.3 List Type 188

9.2.4 Union Type 188

9.2.5 Anonymous Type 189

9.2.6 EMF Extensions 190

9.3 Complex Type Definitions 191

9.3.1 Extension and Restriction 192

9.3.2 Simple Content 193

9.3.3 Anonymous Type 194

9.3.4 Abstract Type 194

9.3.5 Mixed Type 195

9.3.6 EMF Extensions 197

9.3.7 Operations 198

9.4 Attribute Declarations 201

9.4.1 ID Attribute 202

9.4.2 ID Reference or URI Attribute 202

9.4.3 Required Attribute 203

9.4.4 Default Value 204

9.4.5 Qualified Attribute 205

9.4.6 Global Attribute 205

9.4.7 Attribute Reference 205

9.4.8 EMF Extensions 206

9.5 Element Declarations 209

9.5.1 AnyType Element 210

9.5.2 ID Element 211

9.5.3 ID Reference or URI Element 211

9.5.4 Nillable Element 213

9.5.5 Default Value 214

9.5.6 Qualified Element 215

9.5.7 Global Element 215

9.5.8 Element Reference 216

9.5.9 Substitution Group 216

9.5.10 EMF Extensions 219

9.6 Model Groups 222

9.6.1 Repeating Model Group 222

9.6.2 Repeating Model Group Reference 224

9.7 Wildcards 225

9.7.1 Element Wildcard 225

9.7.2 Attribute Wildcard 226

9.7.3 EMF Extensions 227

9.8 Annotations 228

9.8.1 Documentation 228

9.8.2 Appinfo 229

9.8.3 Ignored Annotation 229

9.8.4 Non-schema Attribute 230

9.9 Predefined Schema Simple Types 230

9.10 EMF Extensions 232

Part III Using the EMF Generator 237

Chapter 10 EMF Generator Patterns 239

10.1 Modeled Classes 240

10.1.1 Interfaces and Implementation Classes 240

10.1.2 Accessor Methods 241

10.1.3 Abstract Classes 243

10.1.4 Interfaces 243

10.2 Attributes 243

10.2.1 Simple Attributes 244

10.2.2 Data Type Attributes 245

10.2.3 Enumerated Type Attributes 248

10.2.4 Multi-Valued Attributes 250

10.2.5 Default Values 252

10.2.6 Volatile Attributes 253

10.2.7 Non-Changeable Attributes 254

10.2.8 Unsettable Attributes 255

10.3 References 257

10.3.1 One-Way References 257

10.3.2 Bidirectional References 259

10.3.3 Multiplicity-Many References 261

10.3.4 Non—Proxy-Resolving References 263

10.3.5 Containment References 264

10.3.6 Volatile References 266

10.3.7 Non-Changeable References 267

10.3.8 Unsettable References 268

10.3.9 Map References 269

10.4 Feature Maps 272

10.5 Operations 273

10.6 Class Inheritance 275

10.6.1 Single Inheritance 275

10.6.2 Multiple Inheritance 276

10.6.3 Interface Inheritance and Implementation 277

10.7 Reflective Methods 278

10.7.1 Feature IDs 278

10.7.2 Reflective Accessors 279

10.7.3 Inverse Handshaking Methods 283

10.7.4 Feature ID Conversion Methods 285

10.8 Factories and Packages 287

10.9 Switch Classes and Adapter Factories 291

10.10 Alternative Generator Patterns 295

10.10.1 Performance Optimization 295

10.10.2 Suppression of EMFisms 302

10.11 Customizing Generated Code 305

Chapter 11 EMF.Edit Generator Patterns 309

11.1 Item Providers 310

11.1.1 Content and Label Provider 311

11.1.2 Item Property Source 315

11.1.3 Command Factory 318

11.1.4 Change Notification 319

11.1.5 Object Creation 321

11.2 Item Provider Adapter Factories 327

11.3 Editor 331

11.4 Action Bar Contributor 334

11.5 Wizard 336

11.6 Plug-Ins 337

Chapter 12 Running the Generators 341

12.1 EMF Code Generation 341

12.2 The Generator UI 346

12.3 Generator Model Properties 350

12.3.1 Model Object Properties 350

12.3.2 Package Properties 359

12.3.3 Class Properties 362

12.3.4 Feature Properties 363

12.4 The Command-Line Generator Tools 364

12.4.1 Headless Invocation 365

12.4.2 Rose2GenModel 366

12.4.3 XSD2GenModel 369

12.4.4 Ecore2GenModel 369

12.4.5 Generator 370

12.5 The Generator Ant Tasks 371

12.5.1 emf.Rose2Java 373

12.5.2 emf.XSD2Java 374

12.5.3 emf.Ecore2Java 375

12.6 The Template Format 375

12.6.1 An Example Template 376

12.6.2 Template Extensibility 379

Chapter 13 Example–Implementing a Model and Editor 381

13.1 Getting Started 381

13.2 Generating the Model 384

13.3 Implementing Volatile Features 384

13.4 Implementing Data Types 387

13.5 Running the ExtendedPO2 Editor 392

13.6 Restricting Reference Targets 393

13.7 Splitting the Model into Multiple Packages 396

13.7.1 Resolving Package Dependencies 398

13.7.2 Restricting Reference Targets Revisited 401

13.8 Editing Multiple Resources Concurrently 404

13.8.1 Cross-Document Non-Containment References 404

13.8.2 Cross-Document Containment References 411

Part IV Programming with EMF 417

Chapter 14 Exploiting Metadata 419

14.1 Packages 419

14.1.1 Accessing Package Metadata Generically 420

14.1.2 Locating Packages 422

14.2 Reflection 426

14.2.1 Creating Objects 426

14.2.2 Interrogating and Modifying Objects 427

14.3 Dynamic EMF 432

14.4 Extended Metadata 437

Chapter 15 Persistence 443

15.1 Overview of the Persistence Framework 443

15.2 The EMF Persistence API 447

15.2.1 URI 447

15.2.2 URIConverter 449

15.2.3 Resource 450

15.2.4 Resource.Factory and Resource.Factory.Registry 456

15.2.5 ResourceSet 459

15.3 XML Resources 462

15.3.1 Default Serialization Format 462

15.3.2 Deserialization 468

15.3.3 Options 470

15.3.4 Dynamic EMF 479

15.3.5 Extended Metadata 482

15.3.6 Other Features 485

15.4 EMF Resource and Resource Factory Implementations 489

15.4.1 Base XML 489

15.4.2 Generic XML 490

15.4.3 XMI 490

15.4.4 Ecore 492

15.4.5 EMOF 492

15.4.6 Generated 493

15.5 Performance Considerations 494

15.5.1 Recommended XML Resource Options 494

15.5.2 Caching Intrinsic IDs 495

15.5.3 Caching Resource URIs 496

15.6 Custom Storage for Active Objects 497

15.6.1 Using an EStore 499

15.6.2 EStore and Generated Classes 500

Chapter 16 Client Programming Toolbox 503

16.1 Tree Iterators and Switches 503

16.2 Adapters 508

16.2.1 Object Adapting 508

16.2.2 Behavioral Extensions 515

16.2.3 Content Adapters 519

16.2.4 Observing Generated Classes 521

16.3 Cross-Referencers 523

16.3.1 Basic Cross-Referencers 523

16.3.2 Cross-Reference Adapters 526

16.4 Copying Objects 529

16.5 Comparing Objects 533

Chapter 17 The Change Model 537

17.1 Describing a Change 537

17.1.1 Applying a Change Description 539

17.1.2 Changing Multi-Valued Features 541

17.1.3 Changing Resources 544

17.2 Change Recording 545

17.2.1 Transaction Atomicity and Rollback 547

Chapter 18 The Validation Framework 549

18.1 Constraints and Invariants 549

18.2 Effects on Generated Code 553

18.3 Invoking Validation 557

18.4 Basic EObject Constraints 563

18.5 XML Schema Constraints 564

Chapter 19 EMF.Edit Programming 567

19.1 Overriding Commands 567

19.2 Customizing Views 573

19.2.1 Suppressing Model Objects 573

19.2.2 Using List and Table Viewers 580

19.2.3 Adding Non-Model Intermediary View Objects 587

Chapter 20 Outside of the Eclipse IDE 599

20.1 Rich Client Platform 599

20.1.1 RCP and EMF 600

20.1.2 Launching an RCP Application 601

20.1.3 Generated Code in an RCP Application 606

20.1.4 Deploying an RCP Application 608

20.2 Stand-Alone Applications 608

20.2.1 Adding EMF to the Class Path 609

20.2.2 Registering the Resource Factory 612

20.2.4 Registering the Package 614

Chapter 21 EMF 2.3 and 2.4 617

21.1 Java 5.0 Support 617

21.1.1 Enumerations 618

21.1.2 Generics 622

21.2 EMF Persistence Enhancements 632

21.2.1 Resource Deletion 633

21.2.2 Content Types 634

21.2.3 Other Enhancements 637

21.3 Other New Features 641

21.3.1 Ecore Validation 642

21.3.2 Reference Keys 643

21.3.3 Annotated Java Model Importer 645

21.4 Resource Options 646

21.4.1 XMLResource Options 647

21.5 Generator Model Properties 648

21.5.1 Model Object Properties 648

21.5.2 Package Properties 651

21.5.3 Enum Properties 652

Appendix A UML Notation 653

Appendix B Summary of Example Models 659

Index 675

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Preface

Preface

This book is a comprehensive introduction and developer’s guide to the Eclipse Modeling Framework (EMF). EMF is a powerful framework and code generation facility for building Java applications based on simple model definitions. Designed to make modeling practical and useful to the mainstream Java programmer, EMF unifies three important technologies: Java, XML, and UML. Models can be defined using a UML modeling tool or an XML Schema, or even by specifying simple annotations on Java interfaces. In this last case, the developer writes just a subset of abstract interfaces that describe the model, and the rest of the code is generated automatically and merged back in.

By relating modeling concepts to the simple Java representations of those concepts, EMF has successfully bridged the gap between modelers and Java programmers. It serves as a gentle introduction to modeling for Java programmers and at the same time as a reinforcement of the modeler’s theory that a great deal of coding can be automated, given an appropriate tool. This book shows how EMF is such a tool. It also shows how using EMF lets you do more with your models that you might have thought possible.

EMF provides a runtime framework that allows any modeled data to be easily validated, persisted, and edited in a UI. Change notification and recording are supported automatically. Metadata is available to enable generic processing of any data using a uniform, reflective API. With all of these features and more, EMF is the foundation for data sharing and fine-grained interoperability among tools and applications in Eclipse, in much the same way that Eclipse is itself a platform for integration at the component and UI level. Numerous organizations are currently using Eclipse, EMF, and the growing number of EMF-based technologies in the Eclipse Modeling Project as the foundation for their own commercial and open source offerings.

This book assumes the reader is familiar with object-oriented programming concepts and specifically with the Java programming language. Previous exposure to modeling technologies such as UML, although helpful, is not required. Part I (Chapters 1 to 4) provides a basic overview of the most important concepts in EMF and modeling. This part teaches someone with basic Java programming skills everything needed to start using EMF to model and build an application. Part II (Chapters 5 to 9) presents a thorough overview of EMF’s metamodel, Ecore, followed by details of the mappings between Ecore and the other supported model-definition forms: UML, annotated Java, and XML Schema. Part III (Chapters 10 to 13) includes detailed analyses of EMF’s code generator patterns and tools, followed by an end-to-end example of a non-trivial EMF application. Finally, Part IV (Chapters 14 to 21) takes a close look at EMF’s runtime framework and discusses important EMF programming techniques.

The bulk of this book is based on EMF 2.2, the last version to support the venerable Java 1.4 language. In version 2.3, EMF adopted key language features of Java 5.0, making it incompatible with previous Java runtimes. EMF 2.2, which was current while much of this book was written, is therefore still popular and an excellent base for learning about the framework. The code in Chapters 1 to 20 is based on that version, but due to EMF’s backward compatibility, all examples run without change on version 2.4, the latest at the time of this book’s release. Chapter 21 focuses specifically on changes in EMF 2.3 and 2.4 and, as such, uses 2.4 as the basis for its examples.

Conventions Used in This Book

The following formatting conventions are used throughout this book:

  • Bold—Used for the names of model elements, such as packages, classes, attributes, and references; and of user-interface elements, including menus, buttons, tabs, and text boxes.
  • Italic—Used for filenames and URIs, as well as for placeholder text that is meant to be replaced by a particular name. New terms are often italicized for emphasis. Also, in Chapter 9’s example mappings, items shown purely to provide context appear in italics.
  • Courier—Used for all code samples and for in-text references to code elements, including the names of Java packages, classes, interfaces, methods, fields, variables, and keywords. Plug-in names, command lines, and elements of non-Java files, including XML, also appear in this font.
  • Courier Bold —Used to emphasize portions of code samples, usually new insertions or changes.
  • Courier Strikethrough —Used in code samples to indicate that text should be deleted.

Online Examples

The Web site for this book is located at http://www.informit.com/title/9780321331885. All of the example models and code used throughout this book can be downloaded from there. The site will also provide an errata list, and other news related to the book.

Eclipse and EMF are required to use the examples. You can download one of several Eclipse packages (we recommend Eclipse Classic) at http://www.eclipse.org/downloads/ and the all-in-one EMF SDK at http://www.eclipse.org/modeling/emf/downloads/.

© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2011

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