Emile (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading)

Emile (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading)

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by Jean-Jacques Rousseau
     
 

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Jean-Jacques Rousseau's thesis that children are naturally good at birth violated the traditional Christian doctrine of origin sin. His argument that education should arise from children's natural instincts and impulses rather than trying to civilize and socialize them challenged traditional schooling. Rousseau's defenders see him as a pioneering thinker whose

Overview


Jean-Jacques Rousseau's thesis that children are naturally good at birth violated the traditional Christian doctrine of origin sin. His argument that education should arise from children's natural instincts and impulses rather than trying to civilize and socialize them challenged traditional schooling. Rousseau's defenders see him as a pioneering thinker whose revolutionary ideas about permissive child rearing generated the movement for child-centered progressive education. His detractors, then as now, dismiss him as an inconsistent, wildly utopian, romantic who introduced anti-intellectualism into modern education. These wildly different interpretations of Rousseau's Emile provoked controversy when it was published in 1762 and give the book a continuing relevance today.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781411430532
Publisher:
Barnes & Noble
Publication date:
09/01/2009
Series:
Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
640
File size:
885 KB

Meet the Author


The son of Suzanne Bernard and Isaac Rousseau, a watchmaker, Jean-Jacques was born in Geneva, Switzerland, in 1712. His mother's death when he was less than a month old contributed to his portrayal of Emile as an orphan. Rousseau's Confessions reveal how his childhood experiences shaped his educational ideas in Emile. His essays on economics, politics, religion, and education sparked intense controversy in the eighteenth century and still cause lively discussion today.

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Emile (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you are considering reading Rousseau's EMILE, do. It is an integral work that is worthy of your critical and careful reflection and study. This ubiquitous translation is, nonetheless, incredibly misleading. It reads into the text what is not in the French. Take, for instance, the famous, and indubitoubly important first sentence. 'Tout est bien'--All is well/everything is good as it leaves the hands of the author of things. This is NOT 'God makes everything good'. Read Allan Bloom's translation, instead. Which is the indisputibly eminent English edition.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Classical, missed it in college
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One of my favorite books, I return to it again and again. This is a very nice version too.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A fantastic version of this classic work. Very well done translation. Whoever gave it one star must have a different version, not this version.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago