Emily Dickinson: Selected Letters

Emily Dickinson: Selected Letters

by Emily Dickinson
     
 

When the complete Letters of Emily Dickinson appeared in three volumes in 1958, Robert Kirsch welcomed them in the Los Angeles Times, saying "The missives offer access to the mind and heart of one of America's most intriguing literary personalities." This one-volume selection is at last available in paper-back. It provides crucial texts for theSee more details below

Overview

When the complete Letters of Emily Dickinson appeared in three volumes in 1958, Robert Kirsch welcomed them in the Los Angeles Times, saying "The missives offer access to the mind and heart of one of America's most intriguing literary personalities." This one-volume selection is at last available in paper-back. It provides crucial texts for the appreciation of America literature, women's experience in the ninteenth century, and literature in general.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780674250703
Publisher:
Harvard University Press
Publication date:
03/28/1986
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
384
Sales rank:
662,203
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.14(h) x 1.02(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Table of Contents

  • Publisher’s Note
  • Introduction
  • I. 1842–1846: “…the Hens lay finely…”
  • II. 1847–1848: “I am really at Mt Holyoke…”
  • III. 1849–1850: “Amherst is alive with fun this winter…”
  • IV. 1851–1854: “…we do not have much poetry, father having made up his mind that its pretty much all real life.”
  • V. 1855–1857: “To live, and die, and mount again in triumphant body…
    is no schoolboy’s theme!”
  • VI. 1858–1861: “Much has occurred…so much that I stagger as I write,
    in its sharp remembrance.”
  • VII. 1862–1865: “Perhaps you smile at me. I could not stop for that—
    My Business is Circumference.”
  • VIII. 1866–1869: “A Letter always feels to me like immortality because it is the mind alone without corporeal friend.”
  • IX. 1870–1874: “I find ecstasy in living the mere sense of living is joy enough.”
  • X. 1875–1879: “Nature is a Haunted House but Art—
    a House that tries to be haunted.”
  • XI. 1880–1883: “I hesitate which word to take, as I can take but few and each must be the chiefest…”
  • XII. 1884–1886: “…a Letter is a joy of Earth it is denied the Gods.”
  • Appendix: Biographical Sketches of Recipients of Letters and of Persons Mentioned in Them
  • Index

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