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Emily of New Moon

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Overview

"I love Emily."—Madeleine L'Engle

Finding a Place to Belong

Orphaned after her father's death, thirteen-year-old Emily Starr is sent to live with her snobbish relatives at New Moon Farm. At first, Emily's miserable under all the rules from her stern Aunt Elizabeth. And being the new girl at school is not easy. At least New Moon provides plenty of material for the short stories she loves to write. With her quick wit and lively imagination, it's not long before she finds friends ...

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Overview

"I love Emily."—Madeleine L'Engle

Finding a Place to Belong

Orphaned after her father's death, thirteen-year-old Emily Starr is sent to live with her snobbish relatives at New Moon Farm. At first, Emily's miserable under all the rules from her stern Aunt Elizabeth. And being the new girl at school is not easy. At least New Moon provides plenty of material for the short stories she loves to write. With her quick wit and lively imagination, it's not long before she finds friends in tomboy Ilse and artist Teddy. And even though Emily can't seem to stay out of trouble for long, New Moon may just start to feel like home after all...

This new edition of a classic favorite restores the original, unabridged text and includes an all-new, exclusive introduction with special memories from L.M. Montgomery's granddaughter.

What Readers are Saying:

"For the millions of girls who love Anne of Green Gables, this series provides a glimpse at another girl who is just a little different."

"Although I love Anne of Green Gables, Emily of New Moon is my favorite creation of Lucy Maud Montgomery."

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780771093555
  • Publisher: McClelland & Stewart Ltd.
  • Publication date: 12/4/2007
  • Series: Emily Series , #1
  • Pages: 408
  • Product dimensions: 5.20 (w) x 7.68 (h) x 1.05 (d)

Meet the Author

L.M. Montgomery achieved international fame in her lifetime that endures well over a century later. A prolific writer, she published some 500 short stories and poems and twenty novels. Most recognized for Anne of Green Gables, her work has been hailed by Mark Twain, Margaret Atwood, Madeleine L'Engle and Princess Kate, to name a few. Today, Montgomery's novels, journals, letters, short stories, and poems are read and studied by general readers and scholars from around the world. Her writing appeals to people who love beauty and to those who struggle against oppression.

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Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1

The House in the Hollow

The house in the hollow was "a mile from anywhere"-so Maywood people said. It was situated in a grassy little dale, looking as if it had never been built like other houses but had grown up there like a big, brown mushroom. It was reached by a long, green lane and almost hidden from view by an encircling growth of young birches. No other house could be seen from it although the village was just over the hill. Ellen Greene said it was the lonesomest place in the world and vowed that she wouldn't stay there a day if it wasn't that she pitied the child.

Emily didn't know she was being pitied and didn't know what lonesomeness meant. She had plenty of company. There was Father-and Mike-and Saucy Sal. The Wind Woman was always around; and there were the trees-Adam-and-Eve, and the Rooster Pine, and all the friendly lady-birches.

And there was "the flash," too. She never knew when it might come, and the possibility of it kept her a-thrill and expectant.

Emily had slipped away in the chilly twilight for a walk. She remembered that walk very vividly all her life-perhaps because of a certain eerie beauty that was in it-perhaps because "the flash" came for the first time in weeks-more likely because of what happened after she came back from it.

It had been a dull, cold day in early May, threatening to rain but never raining. Father had lain on the sitting room lounge all day. He had coughed a good deal and he had not talked much to Emily, which was a very unusual thing for him. Most of the time he lay with his hands clasped under his head and his large, sunken, dark-blue eyes fixed dreamily and unseeingly on the cloudy sky that was visible between the boughs of the two big spruces in the front yard-Adam-and-Eve, they always called those spruces, because of a whimsical resemblance Emily had traced between their position, with reference to a small apple tree between them, and that of Adam and Eve and the Tree of Knowledge in an old-fashioned picture in one of Ellen Greene's books. The Tree of Knowledge looked exactly like the squat little apple tree, and Adam and Eve stood up on either side as stiffly and rigidly as did the spruces.

Emily wondered what Father was thinking of, but she never bothered him with questions when his cough was bad. She only wished she had somebody to talk to. Ellen Greene wouldn't talk that day either. She did nothing but grunt, and grunts meant that Ellen was disturbed about something. She had grunted last night after the doctor had whispered to her in the kitchen, and she had grunted when she gave Emily a bedtime snack of bread and molasses. Emily did not like bread and molasses, but she ate it because she did not want to hurt Ellen's feelings. It was not often that Ellen allowed her anything to eat before going to bed, and when she did it meant that for some reason or other she wanted to confer a special favor.

Emily expected the grunting attack would wear off overnight, as it generally did; but it had not, so no company was to be found in Ellen. Not that there was a great deal to be found at any time. Douglas Starr had once, in a fit of exasperation, told Emily that "Ellen Greene was a fat, lazy old thing of no importance," and Emily, whenever she looked at Ellen after that, thought the description fitted her to a hair.

So Emily had curled herself up in the ragged, comfortable old wing-chair and read The Pilgrim's Progress all the afternoon. Emily loved The Pilgrim's Progress. Many a time had she walked the straight and narrow path with Christian and Christiana-although she never liked Christiana's adventures half as well as Christian's. For one thing, there was always such a crowd with Christiana. She had not half the fascination of that solitary, intrepid figure who faced all alone the shadows of the Dark Valley and the encounter with Apollyon. Darkness and hobgoblins were nothing when you had plenty of company. But to be alone-ah, Emily shivered with the delicious horror if it!

When Ellen announced that supper was ready Douglas Starr told Emily to go out to it.

"I don't want anything tonight. I'll just lie here and rest. And when you come in again we'll have a real talk, Elfkin."

He smiled up at her his old, beautiful smile, with the love behind it, that Emily always found so sweet. She ate her supper quite happily-though it wasn't a good supper. The bread was soggy and her egg was underdone, but for a wonder she was allowed to have both Saucy Sal and Mike sitting, one on each side of her, and Ellen only grunted when Emily fed them wee bits of bread and butter.

Mike had such a cute way of sitting up on his haunches and catching the bits in his paws, and Saucy Sal had her trick of touching Emily's ankle with an almost human touch when her turn was too long in coming. Emily loved them both, but Mike was her favorite. He was a handsome, dark-gray cat with huge owl-like eyes, and he was so soft and fat and fluffy. Sal was always thin; no amount of feeding put any flesh on her bones. Emily liked her, but never cared to cuddle or stroke her because of her thinness. Yet there was a sort of weird beauty about her that appealed to Emily. She was gray-and-white-very white and very sleek, with a long, pointed face, very long ears and very green eyes. She was a redoubtable fighter, and strange cats were vanquished in one round. The fearless little spitfire would even attack dogs and rout them utterly.

Emily loved her pussies. She had brought them up herself, as she proudly said. They had been given to her when they were kittens by her Sunday School teacher.

"A living present is so nice," she told Ellen, "because it keeps on getting nicer all the time."

But she worried considerably because Saucy Sal didn't have kittens.

"I don't know why she doesn't," she complained to Ellen Greene. "Most cats seem to have more kittens than they know what to do with."

After supper Emily went in and found that her father had fallen asleep. She was very glad of this; she knew he had not slept much for two nights; but she was a little disappointed that they were not going to have that "real talk." "Real" talks with Father were always such delightful things. But next best would be a walk-a lovely all-by-your-lonesome walk through the gray evening of the young spring. It was so long since she had had a walk.

"You put on your hood and mind you scoot back if it starts to rain," warned Ellen. "You can't monkey with colds the way some kids can."

"Why can't I?" Emily asked rather indignantly. Why must she be debarred from "monkeying with colds" if other children could? It wasn't fair.

But Ellen only grunted. Emily muttered under her breath for her own satisfaction, "You are a fat old thing of no importance!" and slipped upstairs to get her hood-rather reluctantly, for she loved to run bareheaded. She put the faded blue hood on over her long, heavy braid of glossy, jet-black hair, and smiled chummily at her reflection in the little greenish glass. The smile began at the corners of her lips and spread over her face in a slow, subtle, very wonderful way, as Douglas Starr often thought. It was her dead mother's smile-the thing that had caught and held him long ago when he had first seen Juliet Murray. It seemed to be Emily's only physical inheritance from her mother. In all else, he thought, she was like the Starrs-in her large, purplish-gray eyes with their very long lashes and black brows, in her high, white forehead-too high for beauty-in the delicate modeling of her pale oval face and sensitive mouth, in the little ears that were pointed just a wee bit to show that she was kin to tribes of elfland.

"I'm going for a walk with the Wind Woman, dear," said Emily. "I wish I could take you too. Do you ever get out of that room, I wonder. The Wind Woman is going to be out in the fields tonight. She is tall and misty, with thin, gray, silky clothes blowing all about her-and wings like a bat's-only you can see through them-and shining eyes like stars looking through her long, loose hair. She can fly-but tonight she will walk with me all over the fields. She's a great friend of mine-the Wind Woman is. I've known her ever since I was six. We're old, old friends-but not quite so old as you and I, little Emily-in-the-glass. We've been friends always, haven't we?"

With a blown kiss to little Emily-in-the-glass, Emily-out-of-the-glass was off.

The Wind Woman was waiting for her outside-ruffling the little spears of striped grass that were sticking up stiffly in the bed under the sitting-room window-tossing the big boughs of Adam-and-Eve-whispering among the misty green branches of the birches-teasing the "Rooster Pine" behind the house-it really did look like an enormous, ridiculous rooster, with a huge, bunchy tail and a head thrown back to crow.

It was so long since Emily had been out for a walk that she was half crazy with the joy of it. The winter had been so stormy and the snow so deep that she was never allowed out; April had been a month of rain and wind; so on this May evening she felt like a released prisoner. Where should she go? Down the brook-or over the fields to the spruce barrens? Emily chose the latter.

She loved the spruce barrens, away at the further end of the long, sloping pasture. That was a place where magic was made. She came more fully into her fairy birthright there than in any other place. Nobody who saw Emily skimming over the bare field would have envied her. She was little and pale and poorly clad; sometimes she shivered in her thin jacket; yet a queen might have gladly given a crown for her visions-her dreams of wonder. The brown, frosted grasses under her feet were velvet piles. The old, mossy, gnarled half-dead spruce tree, under which she paused for a moment to look up into the sky, was a marble column in a palace of the gods; the far dusky hills were the ramparts of a city of wonder. And for companions she had all the fairies of the countryside-for she could believe in them here-the fairies of the white clover and satin catkins, the little green folk of the grass, the elves of the young fir trees, sprites of wind and wild fern and thistledown. Anything might happen there-everything might come true.

And the barrens were such a splendid place in which to play hide and seek with the Wind Woman. She was so very real there; if you could just spring quickly enough around a little cluster of spruces-only you never could-you would see her as well as feel her and hear her. There she was-that was the sweep of her gray cloak-no, she was laughing up in the very top of the taller trees-and the chase was on again-till, all at once, it seemed as if the Wind Woman were gone-and the evening was bathed in a wonderful silence-and there was a sudden rift in the curdled clouds westward, and a lovely, pale, pinky-green lake of sky with a new moon in it.

Emily stood and looked at it with clasped hands and her little black head upturned. She must go home and write down a description of it in the yellow account book, where the last thing written had been, "Mike's Biograffy" It would hurt her with its beauty until she wrote it down. Then she would read it to Father. She must not forget how the tips of the trees on the hill came out like fine black lace across the edge of the pinky-green sky.

And then, for one glorious, supreme moment, came "the flash."

Emily called it that, although she felt that the name didn't exactly describe it. It couldn't be described-not even to Father, who always seemed a little puzzled by it. Emily never spoke of it to anyone else.

It had always seemed to Emily, ever since she could remember, that she was very, very near to a world of wonderful beauty. Between it and herself hung only a thin curtain; she could never draw the curtain aside-but sometimes, just for a moment, a wind fluttered it and then it was as if she caught a glimpse of the enchanting realm beyond-only a glimpse-and heard a note of unearthly music.

This moment came rarely-went swiftly, leaving her breathless with the inexpressible delight of it. She could never recall it-never summon it-never pretend it; but the wonder of it stayed with her for days. It never came twice with the same thing. Tonight the dark boughs against that far-off sky had given it. It had come with a high, wild note of wind in the night, with a shadow wave over a ripe field, with a graybird lighting on her window-sill in a storm, with the singing of "Holy, holy, holy" in church, with a glimpse of the kitchen fire when she had come home on a dark autumn night, with the spirit-like blue of ice palms on a twilit pane, with a felicitous new word when she was writing down a "description" of something. And always when the flash came to her Emily felt that life was a wonderful, mysterious thing of persistent beauty.

She scuttled back to the house in the hollow, through the gathering twilight, all agog to get home and write down her "description" before the memory picture of what she had seen grew a little blurred. She knew just how she would begin it-the sentence seemed to shape itself in her mind: "The hill called to me and something in me called back to it."

She found Ellen Greene waiting for her on the sunken front-doorstep. Emily was so full of happiness that she loved everything at that moment, even fat things of no importance. She flung her arms around Ellen's knees and hugged them. Ellen looked down gloomily into the rapt little face, where excitement had kindled a faint wild-rose flush, and said, with a ponderous sigh:

"Do you know that your pa has only a week or two more to live?"

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 30 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 30 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 21, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    ONE OF MY FAVORITE BOOKS!

    When I first started reading it I knew I would love it. I did. Emily is a wonderful girl! It has excitment, romance, and just enough ''Spice!'' L. M. Montgomery has done is again! I also recommend the whole Anne series!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 20, 2009

    Loved this as a little girl

    The Emily of New Moon series were my favorite books as a little girl. I cannot wait until my daughter is old enough to read them herself. Emily is real, she is touching, and she is honest.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 6, 2008

    A reviewer

    I grew up with the Anne of Green Gables books, but had never even considered looking into other works by L.M. Montgomery. I happend upon this book in a bookshop a year ago, and I was captivated! Emily is a very real girl, with real friends. Montgomery was a psychological geneous, as evidenced by her character development in all her books! I was encouraged by this book, because, like Emily, I love to write, and this spurred me on to that end. The four stars (as opposed to five) were because the story did drag a bit in the first couple of chapters.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2013

    Hi kiki

    Hi kiki hope you visit this series alot love you!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2008

    mjc, an avid reader

    i love the whole series. lmm is such a great author. i loved everything about the book. i hated putting it down. it's so real, and so cool how you can see emily grow and stuff. this is definitely the 3rd best book lmm has written rilla of ingleside and anne of green gables are really good too. truly inspirational to an aspiring writer!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2006

    a book worthy of its audience

    even thought i havent read much, i feel this is the best book i ever read. it is very revelant to our everyday lives as the characters are very down to earth. i really enjoyed reading this book and the other two following series. Emily indeed is a very likable character and her ambition to become a writer is ever more laudable.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 1, 2006

    Emily Takes All!

    This is the heart-rending story of a lonely orphan who learns to love, to live, to write. Emily Starr is an inspiring female character...don't miss out on her antics and idiosyncrasies! I would recommend this book to anyone in the world!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2006

    perfect

    i just finished this book less than 10 seconds ago. I watched Emily grow up, i was sad to finish. A really great book, I couldn't put it down!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2005

    A book full of wit and vivid imagery

    Emily of New Moon is an excellent book. I, especially, can relate to Emily because I am an aspiring writer. Many of Emily's feelings and comments throughout the book ring quite true. The only thing I regretted about the novel was the countless number of times that something happened that could be labeled quite truthfully 'unfair.' While this is good in small amounts in any book, you should not put it down feeling as if the character has been beaten around the head a few too many times. All in all, however, I was pleased with Lucy Maude's extrodinary imagery. The descriptions of New Moon were, in my opinion, the high part of it all. While I would not recommend the other two Emily books, I think the first is a must-read for girls 9-14 who like historical fiction and poetry.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2003

    I LOVE IT!!!

    this was a fantasic book i hope every one enjoys it as i have

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2002

    A sweet book, perfict for nights of reading with your cat

    Emily is now an orphane and is forsed to live with her strict aunt. Emilys life changes in many ways an worst of all she is forbidden to write in her presius journal, and she is forced to leave all but one of her sweet cats behind. Emily is strong and doesnt give up hope. Now she can be called Emily of New Moon.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 21, 2002

    Very slow moving plot

    The Emily storys are boring in some parts but they have a good plot and Montgomery uses greta techniques to make this book seem as if it is in its time period. Very historicaly correct, but needs some help. descrptions get very detailed and slows down the plot. This novel is full of unneeded words. If when quicker, i might have been able to get through the book enjoyably in a day but it has taken me 2 weeks to finish it. The book has good potntial and a good plot. I recommend it to read but it definatly isn't the best. i wish i could give it moe stars, but i truely can't.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2001

    A wonderfully written novel

    The Emily series are a particularly good one, in each book, Emily wins your heart with every adventure she begins. This is a wonderful book that children and adults of all ages can relate to!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2001

    For all Ages!

    I liked this book very much. It was very interesting and I think anybody can enjoy it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 1, 2000

    Emily of New Moon Enchanting

    While reading Emily of New Moon, I was 'enchanted', as my title suggests. Within its pages you will find a spirit that is romantic and adventurous, and as you read it, you will see Emily conquer many hurdles in her life at New Moon farm. With the help of her dear friends, her beloved father's memory, and some harsh family members, the story is brought about delightfully. I thoroughly enjoyed this book, and would recommend it to anyone who loves a spirited, romantic book. Once reading this, be prepared to be longing to read the second in the series, Emily Climbs.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 24, 2000

    If you love touching and creative stories, this book is for you!

    In this charming story, Emily, an orphan, goes to live with her Aunt Elizabeth at New Moon. There, she experiences a different sort of life and goes through personality conflicts with her aunt. A young authoress, Emily improves her writing with struggle after struggle and her experience added to her knowledge shapes her character. You will love this splendid tale and you will be encouraged by her decisive yet obedient personality. Afterwards you won't wait to pick up the sequel, Emily Climbs. Enjoy this fun story!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 21, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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