×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Emily Post's Table Manners for Kids
     

Emily Post's Table Manners for Kids

3.6 3
by Cindy Post Senning, Steve Bjorkman (Illustrator), Peggy Post
 

See All Formats & Editions

  • Which fork do I use?
  • How do you use chopsticks?
  • Is it okay to answer my cell phone during dinner?
  • What is the polite way to eat spaghetti?

These and other important questions are answered in this handy guide to eating without grossing people out. Pretty much everything you need to know to get you through any meal is here—from

Overview

  • Which fork do I use?
  • How do you use chopsticks?
  • Is it okay to answer my cell phone during dinner?
  • What is the polite way to eat spaghetti?

These and other important questions are answered in this handy guide to eating without grossing people out. Pretty much everything you need to know to get you through any meal is here—from table settings, to eating tricky foods, to holding up your end of a dinner conversation.

Written by two codirectors of The Emily Post Institute, the most trusted name in etiquette, Emily Post's Table Manners for Kids isn't just for fancy parties and dinner at your grandmother's house. It's got basic information you can use every day to improve your social life.

Editorial Reviews

ALA Booklist
“Adding touches of wit, Björkman’s deft line drawings will appeal to middle-school students as well as younger children...This clearly written book offers practical advice that will help young people to feel more comfortable when dining with others and, of course, to avoid disgusting their companions.”
Children's Literature - Carlee Hallman
This practical guide to eating together without "grossing each other out" will be appreciated by parents and kids alike. Humorous cartoons throughout the text keep the mood light. Sidebars fill in special information such as a list of foods sometimes eaten with a fork or fingers and how to use chopsticks. It is recommended that kids come to the table with shirt, shoes, and no cap. When visiting a friend, check to see if the family says grace. At a formal dinner the utensils are used starting on the outer edges. Specific directions are given for eating corn on the cob, French onion soup, shish kebob, and other special foods. Eating together is also a social occasion. Twelve tips for table talk are listed and what topics to avoid. Manners are adjusted to fit various situations such as eating in the school cafeteria, at a potluck, at a picnic, or at a holiday meal. Suggestions from planning to cleanup are given for times you want to be the host. Kids and their parents will find support for pleasant mealtime manners from the daughter and granddaughter of Emily Post, the doyen of manners of the previous generation. Reviewer: Carlee Hallman
School Library Journal
Gr 4–8—This guide is a helpful tool to introduce children to the basics of dining do's and don'ts. Divided into six chapters that cover a wide range of table-related topics, as well as picnicking in the park and on the beach, the book includes tips on how to use chopsticks, what to do if there's a fly in your soup, and how to eat corn on the cob. Each chapter includes quizzes, humorous black-and-white cartoons and diagrams as well as questions and answers in child-friendly language. Readers will find the index a handy way to look up a specific topic and appreciate the bulleted lists and numbered steps. Written for today's audience, the text offers advice on dining at a food court and how to eat fast food in the car. While intended for a juvenile audience, adults are sure to learn a new custom or two and may find their manners improving as well.—Maura Bresnahan, High Plain Elementary School, Andover, MA
Kirkus Reviews
This deceptively slim guide teems with advice about everything from meal courses to table settings, from the art of conversation to dining out. The tone is measured and mildly proscriptive, offset by Bjorkman's amusing cartoons. While the writing is smoothly expository, there's an occasional, awkward attempt to court the modern child's sensibility, as in intermittent "Picture This" scenarios. ("Picture this. You have planned an awesome party. Your parents are going to help you with preparing a special meal. You have a DVD of the best concert given by your favorite group.") The organization somewhat randomly mixes paragraphs, bulleted lists, Q-and-A sections and text boxes, yet it seems curiously, and perhaps intentionally, old-fashioned. A strength: the excellent troubleshooting for specific concerns, such as eating fondue and using chopsticks. While geared to those already possessing a few manners-what with concerns for lemon wedges and dessert forks-there's plenty to chew on here. (Nonfiction. 8-12)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061117091
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
05/12/2009
Pages:
96
Sales rank:
237,511
Product dimensions:
7.78(w) x 9.56(h) x 0.47(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Cindy Post Senning, Ed.D., codirector of The Emily Post Institute, Inc., developed a training program for etiquette educators and conducts children's etiquette workshops across the U.S. and overseas. Cindy is the coauthor of all the Emily Post children's books, with her sister-in-law, Peggy Post.

Steve Bjorkman has illustrated nearly one hundred picture books, including the New York Times bestseller Dirt on My Shirt by Jeff Foxworthy. He has also sold millions of greeting cards through Recycled Paper Greetings with his brother, Carl. Steve lives with his wife in Irvine, California.

Peggy Post, Emily Post’s great-granddaughter-in-law, is a director of The Emily Post Institute and the author of more than a dozen books. Peggy writes a monthly column in Good Housekeeping and an online wedding etiquette column for the New York Times.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Emily Post's Table Manners for Kids 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago