Emily's Quest (Emily Series #3)

( 24 )

Overview

The third and final volume of Lucy Maud Montgomery?s celebrated Emily trilogy, Emily?s Quest is a vigorously drawn study of a woman coming to terms with love and her own ambition. In no other novel did Montgomery explore more fully the beauty, complexity, and wonder of love. In every detail, this mature novel, by one of the world?s best-loved authors, captures the drama and confusion of a young life on the brink.

Along with Emily of New Moon ...
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Emily's Quest

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Overview

The third and final volume of Lucy Maud Montgomery’s celebrated Emily trilogy, Emily’s Quest is a vigorously drawn study of a woman coming to terms with love and her own ambition. In no other novel did Montgomery explore more fully the beauty, complexity, and wonder of love. In every detail, this mature novel, by one of the world’s best-loved authors, captures the drama and confusion of a young life on the brink.

Along with Emily of New Moon and Emily Climbs, Emily’s Quest is an honest and poignant portrait of a singular woman.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780553264937
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 7/28/1983
  • Series: Emily Novels Series , #3
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 240
  • Sales rank: 415,759
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Lexile: 950L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 4.87 (w) x 6.87 (h) x 0.69 (d)

Meet the Author

Lucy Maud Montgomery was born in Clifton, Prince Edward Island, in 1874. Educated at Prince Edward College, Charlottetown, and Dalhousie University, she embarked on a career in teaching. From 1898 until 1911 she took care of her maternal grandmother in Cavendish, Prince Edward Island, and during this time wrote many poems and stories for Canadian and American magazines.

Montgomery’s first novel, Anne of Green Gables, met with immediate critical and popular acclaim, and its success, both national and international, led to seven sequels. More autobiographical than the books about Anne is the trilogy of novels about another Island orphan, Emily Starr.

In 1911 Montgomery married the Rev. Ewan Macdonald, a Presbyterian clergyman, and they lived in Ontario, where he was the pastor of parishes in Leaskdale and, later, in Norval. They retired to Toronto in 1936.

Lucy Maud Montgomery died in Toronto in 1942.

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Read an Excerpt

One  I "No more cambric tea" had Emily Byrd Starr written in her diary when she came home to New Moon from Shrewsbury, with high school days behind her and immortality before her. Which was a symbol. When Aunt Elizabeth Murray permitted Emily to drink real tea – as a matter of course and not as an occasional concession – she thereby tacitly consented to let Emily grow up. Emily had been considered grown-up by other people for sometime, especially by Cousin Andrew Murray and Friend Perry Miller, each of whom had asked her to marry him and been disdainfully refused for his pains. When Aunt Elizabeth found this out she knew it was no use to go on making Emily drink cambric tea. Though, even then, Emily had no real hope that she would ever be permitted to wear silk stockings. A silk petticoat might be tolerated, being a hidden thing, in spite of its seductive rustle, but silk stockings were immoral. So Emily, of whom it was whispered somewhat mysteriously by people who knew her to people who didn't know her,  "she writes," was accepted as one of the ladies of New Moon, where nothing had ever changed since her coming there seven years before and where the carved ornament on the sideboard still cast the same queer shadow of an Ethiopian silhouette on exactly the same place on the wall where she had noticed it delightedly on her first evening there. An old house that had lived its life long ago and so was very quiet and wise and a little mysterious. Also a little austere, but very kind. Some of the Blair Water and Shrewsbury people thought it was a dull place and outlook for a young girl and said she had been very foolish to refuse Miss Royal's offer of a "position on a magazine" in New York. Throwing away such a good chance to make something of herself! But Emily, who had very clear-cut ideas of what she was going to make of herself, did not think life would be dull at New Moon or that she had lost her chance of Alpine climbing because she had elected to stay there. She belonged by right divine to the Ancient and Noble Order of Story-tellers. Born thousands of years earlier she would have sat in the circle around the fires of the tribe and enchanted her listeners. Born in the foremost files of time she must reach her audience through many artificial mediums. But the materials of story weaving are the same in all ages and all places. Births, deaths, marriages, scandals – these are the only really interesting things in the world. So she settled down very determinedly and happily to her pursuit of fame and fortune – and of something that was neither. For writing, to Emily Byrd Starr, was not primarily a matter of worldly lucre or laurel crown. It was something she had to do. A thing – an idea – whether of beauty or ugliness, tortured her until it was "written out." Humorous and dramatic by instinct, the comedy and tragedy of life enthralled her and demanded expression through her pen. A world of lost but immortal dreams, lying just beyond the drop-curtain of the real, called to her for embodiment and interpretation – called with a voice she could not – dared not – disobey. She was filled with youth's joy in mere existence. Life was forever luring and beckoning her onward. She knew that a hard struggle was before her; she knew that she must constantly offend Blair Water neighbours who would want her to write obituaries for them and who, if she used an unfamiliar word, would say contemptuously that she was "talking big"; she knew there would be rejection slips galore; she knew there would be days when she would feel despairingly that she could not write and that it was of no use to try; days when the editorial phrase, "not necessarily a reflection on its merits," would get on her nerves to such an extent that she would feel like imitating Marie Bashkirtseff and hurling the taunting, ticking, remorseless sitting-room clock out of the window; days when everything she had done or tried to do would slump – become mediocre and despicable; days when she would be tempted to bitter disbelief in her fundamental conviction that there was as much truth in the poetry of life as in the prose; days when the echo of that "random word" of the gods, for which she so avidly listened, would only seem to taunt her with its suggestions of unattainable perfection and loveliness beyond the reach of mortal ear or pen. She knew that Aunt Elizabeth tolerated but never approved her mania for scribbling. In her last two years in Shrewsbury High School Emily, to Aunt Elizabeth's almost incredulous amazement, had actually earned some money by her verses and stories. Hence the toleration. But no Murray had ever done such a thing before. And there was always that sense, which Dame Elizabeth Murray did not like, of being shut out of something. Aunt Elizabeth really resented the fact that Emily had another world, apart from the world of New Moon and Blair Water, a kingdom starry and illimitable, into which she could enter at will and into which not even the most determined and suspicious of aunts could follow her. I really think that if Emily's eyes had not so often seemed to be looking at something dreamy and lovely and secretive Aunt Elizabeth might have had more sympathy with her ambitions. None of us, not even self-sufficing Murrays of New Moon, like to be barred out.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 24 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(19)

4 Star

(5)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 24 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 3, 2014

    Runes updated scedule

    1: ATHLETICS
    <br>
    <p>
    2: SURVIVAL
    <br>
    <p>
    3: gold-smithing
    <br>
    <p>
    4: STRATEGIES
    <br>
    <p>
    5: mythincal creature knowlage
    <br>
    <p>
    Rune teaches the dragon class, so yeah. She will go to her classes if she doesn't have one.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2014

    Tear's schedual

    1. COMBAT MAGIC / 2. Combat / 3. Hunting / 4. Athletics / 5. Strategy / 6. Survival / 7. Monster fighting / 8. Healing / 9. Gladiating / 10. War combat./

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2014

    Nick's Schedule

    1. Combat <p> 2. Alchemy <p> 3. Strategy <p> 4. Animal Charming. <p> 5. Crafting <p> 6. Survival <p> 7. Monster Fighting <p> 8. Healing <p> 9. War Combat. <p> 10. Elementals

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 3, 2014

    Dukes Schuedule (updated 1.7.1)

    1;ATHLETICS 2;Crafting 3Monster Training 4:COMBAT 5;Monster Combat 6;War Combat 7;SURVIVAL 8;STRATEGY 9;HUNTING 10;Art of Outlawing.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2014

    Laurels scedual

    1. COMBAT MAGIC<br>
    2. Animal charming<br>
    3. Survival<br>
    4. Elementals<br>
    5. Enchanting<br>
    6. COMBAT WIZARDRY<br>
    7. Potions mastery<br>
    8. Strategy<br>
    9. Hunting<br>
    10. Crafting <p>
    Th is not in order except the ones in capital letters

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2014

    Alec's Schedule

    1. INSTRUCTING COMBAT
    2. Gladiating
    3. Survival
    4. Divining
    5. Elementals
    6. Alchemy
    7. Potions mastery
    8. Strategy
    9. Athletics
    10. Smithery

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2011

    Emily's Conclusion

    This one takes you on many twists and turns and frustrating journeys. It is all worth it!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 18, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    One of my favorite books!

    This books is so thrillingly romantic. I love Emily's love story. It was so touching, and I actually cried when Teddy's mother told her the truth. This book is worth reading and worth keeping!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 6, 2008

    A reviewer

    I got so drawn into this third Emily book that I completely zoned out! I also found myself saying a quick prayer for characters in the story--then I'd catch myself and realize they weren't real people! That's how true the book became to me as I read it. It took me two days to read it, and it only took that long because I had a big event I was involved in! L.M. Montgomery has written a story that comes very close to my heart and soul. Emily's dreams come true were so inspirational, and in a way, coincide with my own dreams come true!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2006

    WOW! AMAZING!

    This book is outstanding. It is the best out of the entire series, and also is one of L.M. Montgomery's best books. I have read many books, and everytime I pick this one up, I feel like I AM Emily. I understand her perfectly. She feels like the one best friend that understands you and you understand!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 19, 2005

    Absolutely Delicious

    I loved this book. I read it all in one day. It was so good I couldn't put it down. LM is an awesome writer. She always writes something inspirational, and this book is no different. I suffered with Emily and laughed with her. It's a marvelous classic

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 18, 2002

    #1 fan

    an outstanding thrilling book after readng all three emily books im truly a fan.Everyone will love this book no matter what age they are and will fall in love with emily cause she's just a unique person who you'd want to get to know. ~

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2002

    Great Book!

    I thought that the whole Emily series was wonderful. L.M. Montgomery is truly a gifted author. I started out by reading her Anne of Green Gables series and have spread out to all the other books she wrote. In doing so I found another favorite of mine! wow! that is the best word to describe it!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2001

    timeless classic

    I'm 28 years old and just re-read the Emily books for about the 5th time since I got them at age 11. These are the most wonderful books! They are the kind of books that really stick with you and haunt you for days after finishing them.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2001

    Wonderful book

    This is a great book but I did find it a little depressing. The character (Emily)'s feelings were described so well that I couldn't help feeling the same way as she did.She did change a lot from that carefree Fourteen year old to an adult facing new challenges. As always L.M. Montgomery used many great descriptions!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2000

    Way Cool

    This is a great book. I think it inspires kids not to give up on what they want. I wish I could have read it sooner.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 24, 2000

    Emily's Quest-- an oustanding book

    Emily's Quest was one of the most amazing books I have ever read. When one reads it, they really get caught up in it. I found myself crying at many parts, and smiling joyously at others. When something bad happened, it even put me in a bad mood. The writer was an extraordinary writer, and I intend on reading many more of her books. This one took many unexpected turns, and was so suspenceful, I found myself peeking at the back of the book to find out what happened. The night I finished it, I even drempt about it. This book really touched me, and I think every person out there should read it. I'm sure almost everyone would be able to understand Emily, and fell her pain and sorrow. I give it five stars, and two thumbs up.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2000

    Emily's climb on the alpinepath

    Emily Byrd Starr was born with a taste for writing. She made a vow that she would one day climb the alpinepath. Emily went to live wih her aunt Ruth in Shrewshberry after begging aunt Elizabeth for it. When one day a lady named Janet Royal gives her a rope to climb the alpinepath in this book she climbs it she is famous!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 24 Customer Reviews

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